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 Posted:   Sep 25, 2014 - 7:58 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

These issues of The Fantastic Four from 1979 made a significant impact on young me and I believe time has been most kind to this largely-forgotten epic. It introduced Terrax the Terrible and featured the greatest knock-down fight between planet-destroying giants ever witnessed on (quickly-yellowing) comic book paper...



...but thankfully it's now on a nice hardcover edition. cool

 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2014 - 5:07 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

From Fantastic Four #213



It's epic! It's big!

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2014 - 1:21 PM   
 By:   Gordon Reeves   (Member)



Our former professional alma mater, The Hollywood Reporter, uh, reported the following today:

[ On Friday, Marvel ended a long and bitter feud with the estate of comic book legend Jack Kirby, announcing a settlement just days before the U.S. Supreme Court had scheduled a conference to discuss whether to take up a case with potentially billions on the line.

“Marvel and the family of Jack Kirby have amicably resolved their legal disputes, and are looking forward to advancing their shared goal of honoring Mr. Kirby’s significant role in Marvel’s history,” read a joint statement from Marvel and the Kirby Family.

... The lawsuit seemed like it was headed towards a historical footnote when all of a sudden, the Kirby estate's attempt to get high court review gathered steam. Most petitions for cert are denied, but after some respected intellectual property veterans weighed in with amicus briefs, the Supreme Court ordered Marvel to respond. The studio eventually did just that, but the hot dispute was also commanding the attention of both Hollywood labor guilds as well as the respected lawyer who founded Scotusblog, who signed on to represent the Kirby side. ]


Read the full (NOT imaginary) tale here:

> http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/thr-esq/marvel-jack-kirby-estate-settlement. >

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2014 - 1:33 PM   
 By:   riotengine   (Member)

As a longtime Kirby fan and a comics professional, I am elated at this news.

Greg Espinoza

 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2014 - 1:42 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

The kids around here always need reminding, so here it is again:

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2014 - 1:45 PM   
 By:   Gordon Reeves   (Member)

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2014 - 1:51 PM   
 By:   Gordon Reeves   (Member)



Ah, Greg-ster, thou art hardly alone. Sometymes, if ya live long enuff, not
only do you out-last the arrogant bastards and their entrenched corporate
mafia,



but the good guys even score a brilliantly-belated touchdown ...

 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2014 - 2:00 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I can see those corporate goons now...

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 26, 2014 - 2:06 PM   
 By:   Gordon Reeves   (Member)

 
 Posted:   Sep 27, 2014 - 3:33 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I never met a Kirby "High Concept" panel I didn't like (even when Vinnie C. got in the way, but you and I have been through that, and this is not our fate. Let us not talk falsely now, the hour is getting late...)



And Galactus has got to be one of the greatest characters...EVER. The look, the origin, the tricky morality and ethics. lol I love it all.

Thumbs way the hell up!

 
 Posted:   Sep 27, 2014 - 7:18 AM   
 By:   Scott M (Oldsmith)   (Member)

These issues of The Fantastic Four from 1979 made a significant impact on young me and I believe time has been most kind to this largely-forgotten epic. It introduced Terrax the Terrible and featured the greatest knock-down fight between planet-destroying giants ever witnessed on (quickly-yellowing) comic book paper...
'>


This is a great arc and one of the first comics I picked up as a kid on a long drive to get my sister to Albany for college. I grabbed two issues off a rest stop spinner rack. It got me into the FF and began a love affair that continues to this day. I still have the issues and the reprint collection. Amazing art in there by Byrne and Sinnott.

 
 Posted:   Sep 27, 2014 - 12:15 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

This is a great arc and one of the first comics I picked up as a kid on a long drive to get my sister to Albany for college. I grabbed two issues off a rest stop spinner rack. It got me into the FF and began a love affair that continues to this day. I still have the issues and the reprint collection. Amazing art in there by Byrne and Sinnott.

I didn't catch onto the story arc until 213 but it is the best issue of the lot. I wouldn't get the rest of the issues until a few years later, with the proliferation of comic book shops. The time issue 213 was published--September 1979-- was huge for me as I began my regular comic reading--outside of Marvel's Star Wars series, of course (after all, I was only eight in 1979).

Recently picked up FF #217--mostly as a joke as I've put it off for years--because it is the sending off of the dreaded "H.E.R.B.I.E." from the comic series, as the FF cartoon had been canceled by early 1980. I remember being supremely annoyed that the Human Torch wasn't on the team.

 
 Posted:   Sep 28, 2014 - 7:59 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

A detailed site that thinks of the Fantastic Four as a "Great American Novel" circa 1961-1988. Lots of interesting thoughts there. Here's the aforementioned 1979:

http://zak-site.com/Great-American-Novel/ff-act4-FF201.html

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 28, 2014 - 3:52 PM   
 By:   riotengine   (Member)

A pretty well-considered article on the settlement.

http://www.geekyuniverse.com/the-kirbymarvel-settlement-what-does-it-mean/

Greg Espinoza

 
 Posted:   Sep 29, 2014 - 2:29 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

A pretty well-considered article on the settlement.

http://www.geekyuniverse.com/the-kirbymarvel-settlement-what-does-it-mean/

Greg Espinoza


My two Centavos, (not that you boys are reading this...)

While the article is entirely speculative (and admits so), it does lay out the whys and whens of the suit.

It's things like the Kirby suit and other painful stories I've read over the years that have shattered my childhood illusions of how "happy" comic book creators are. They largely come across as a deeply unhappy, bitter, and cynical lot. I could list at least a half a dozen legendary comics creators and they would all fit that description. Even the ones who haven't been royally f_cked (legally or otherwise) out of money, credit, or fame by their employers have a hardness about them I can sense in interviews and their public appearances.

Speaking of appearances, George Perez is doing a signing at my LCS this Tuesday. $30.00 to buy his new graphic novel and have three items of one's choice signed. I'd love to go, but I'm working and I've never been much of an autograph hound. I loved GP's work on Teen Titans and especially the JLA and Avengers comics in the late '70-early '80s.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 29, 2014 - 10:18 AM   
 By:   Gordon Reeves   (Member)



As to your understandable lamentation for the inevitable shattering of illusions (or Talent Has
Absolutely NOTHING to Do with Character
Department)



watch < ALAN MOORE - talks about Stan Lee, Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko > on

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1iFV1HdO2pQ'>.



Twill be Moore (not Roger, Mary Tyler or Dudley) than 'Nuff Said ...

 
 Posted:   Sep 30, 2014 - 4:13 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I watched the Moore interview and a few years ago that Jonathan Ross Ditko program where Stan "The Con Man" Lee said the infamous "In my opinion, Steve Ditko created Spider-Man..." line. The fact is, Stan Lee has amazing--no pun intended--business and self-promotional acumen whereas the likes of shy Jack and reclusive Steve absolutely do not. Stan capitalized (understatement) on his own boisterous and admittedly charming and highly-charismatic personality.

These are sad truths in an industry that has brought me much joy during the course of a (misspent) lifetime.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 3, 2014 - 2:55 PM   
 By:   Gordon Reeves   (Member)



In the mid-80s, two deaths (one as inevitable as a Greek tragedy, the other not originally intended but over-ruled and ordered by the-then Editor-in-Tall-Chief) rocked the Marvel Universe as nothing else had before or, arguably, since (even the overwhelming media hoopla re the supposed 'death' of Supes proved nothing more than an extremely premeditated orchestration of audience manipulation - and financial pilfering).

Our question is: which do you believe had the greatest influential impact?



For us, twas unmistakably Frank Miller's brave and bold (wink unflinching adherence to the dramatic arc he intuitively felt and knew had to be - as courageous a creative decision heretofore unknown but which remains an utterly unique legacy all its own ...

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 3, 2014 - 3:19 PM   
 By:   riotengine   (Member)

You guys see this? I can't disagree with a lot of these choices.

Greg Espinoza

http://goodcomics.comicbookresources.com/category/75-most-memorable-moments-in-marvel-comics-history/

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 16, 2014 - 1:22 PM   
 By:   Gordon Reeves   (Member)







 
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