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 Posted:   Apr 7, 2014 - 10:24 AM   
 By:   Storyteller   (Member)

OK, apparently two of my titles are MODs. LOL.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 7, 2014 - 10:37 AM   
 By:   arthur grant   (Member)









I've listed the first. The other 2 look like good transfers on DVD. Thanks for the suggestions.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 7, 2014 - 10:47 AM   
 By:   arthur grant   (Member)

John Frankenheimer's 1982 film The Challenge has never seen a legit release. I'd love to have it.

Me too! Thanks for reminding me. It's posted along with some of my choices which I'll quickly list here soon.


Another vote from me. I really liked that film.

Another I would buy in an instant is the Jimmy Stewart film, Fool's Parade.

Greg Espinoza


You reminded me I saw this film in the theatre. It's the Davis Grubb novel that made it click. I honestly can't remember much about it but hey, Grubb wrote Night of the Hunter and it had that ominous atmosphere. Pretty interesting. Posted!

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 7, 2014 - 10:55 AM   
 By:   arthur grant   (Member)

Pia Zadora is THE LONELY LADY.

So is this something you're dying to see released? Have you actually seen it? Just want to clarify before trying to hunt it down.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 7, 2014 - 11:08 AM   
 By:   arthur grant   (Member)

“W.C. Fields and Me” – Along with “Gable and Lombard,” this was one of two 1976 Universal Studios’ biopics of stars from Hollywood’s golden age. This one cast Rod Steiger as Fields, Jack Cassidy as John Barrymore, and Valerie Perrine as Carlotta Monti, Fields’ live-in secretary, and upon whose book the film is based. The film probably deserves to be seen for no other reason than its Henry Mancini score (the LP of which has yet to surface on CD). The film has never been released on any video format, but is currently available as a download.



Another I saw in the theatre and was impressed with the performances. The thing about "downloads" is that they can come and go, don't always work properly and are a further pain for us who live outside the U.S.. I can do it (from here in Australia) by using a service that will register my computer there but the quality usually sucks big time. Anyway, W.C.+Me is posted. Thanks.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 7, 2014 - 11:12 AM   
 By:   arthur grant   (Member)



So here's what the board looks like so far:

http://www.pinterest.com/arthurgrant9883/most-wanted-on-dvd-or-blu-ray/

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 7, 2014 - 12:06 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

CITIZENS BAND was a critically acclaimed box office dud from 1977. This Jonathan Demme film is about how the citizens band radio craze of the 1970s affected the lives of all of the characters in the film. It was Demme’s first film not connected with Roger Corman. While the film is worthwhile, its early Bill Conti score is less so. It's sparingly used and doesn't seem to have the melodies that I usually associate with Conti.

CITIZENS BAND opened on 18 May 1977 in 200 theaters in thirty cities (not including New York). It was quickly pulled from venues when it failed to draw audiences. Paramount retitled the film “Handle With Care,” and it was selected to screen at the New York Film Festival on 30 September 1977. Paramount planned to then open the film in New York City at the Little Carnegie, a Manhattan art-house theater. But Daily Variety reported that the four-week engagement at the Little Carnegie was “disastrous.” In November 1977, Paramount then took the unusual measure of booking the film into two New York City theaters for five days of free screenings. But nothing could stir interest in the film.

CITIZENS BAND finally got a videotape release in 1998, in the waning days of VHS, and is available as a download, but has never been on DVD. Like Paramount's barely seen WHITE DOG, it might make a good Criterion release.

 
 Posted:   Apr 7, 2014 - 2:35 PM   
 By:   Storyteller   (Member)

How about a couple of unreleased comedies:




 
 
 Posted:   Apr 7, 2014 - 2:52 PM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)

The original One Million BC 1940. I first saw it at Saturday morning pictures (Brits of a certain age will know what I'm talking about), & I thought it was brilliant. And two fifties British b/w POW WW2 films, Albert R.N. '53 & Danger Within '58. Oh, & a fifties Hammer war film, The Steele Bayonet, like Albert R.N. I haven't seen it since the sixties (on the Telly). Danger Within shows up quite often on TV in a battered old print.

And of course, The Honkers 1972 A rodeo film starring the late & oh so great, James Coburn. No excuses for this one not being available.

 
 Posted:   Apr 7, 2014 - 3:31 PM   
 By:   Essankay   (Member)

  • GREED (1924) - von Stroheim
  • THE WEDDING MARCH (1928) - von Stroheim
  • BEGGARS OF LIFE (1928) - Wellman
  • TEMPTATION HARBOR (1947) - Comfort
  • MOONRISE (1948) - Borzage
  • NIGHT HAS A THOUSAND EYES (1948) - Farrow
  • M (1951) - Losey
  • THE LUSTY MEN (1952) - Ray
  • FILMING 'OTHELLO' (1978) - Welles

  •  
     
     Posted:   Apr 7, 2014 - 4:15 PM   
     By:   riotengine   (Member)

    How about a couple of unreleased comedies:



    Good choice, Storyteller. Love this movie.Great cast with Malcolm McDowall, Daniel Stern, Ed Begley Jr as Colin Beverly.

    Here's another one: Nightflyers with Catherine Mary Stewart and Michael Praed.

    Greg Espinoza

     
     Posted:   Apr 7, 2014 - 4:31 PM   
     By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

    FREUD w/Montgomery Clift

     
     Posted:   Apr 7, 2014 - 4:39 PM   
     By:   BornOfAJackal   (Member)

    Pia Zadora is THE LONELY LADY.

    So is this something you're dying to see released? Have you actually seen it? Just want to clarify before trying to hunt it down.


    Would love to see the hilarious "sex under the influence" scene, or the infamous "hallucination" scene in high definition. It's the movie that killed once and for all the hackneyed Jacqueline Susann/Harold Robbins school of trash spectaculars that plagued the cinema in the late '70s/early '80s.

     
     Posted:   Apr 7, 2014 - 4:43 PM   
     By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

    Pia Zadora is THE LONELY LADY.

    .

    ...the movie that killed once and for all the hackneyed Jacqueline Susann/Harold Robbins school of trash spectaculars that plagued the cinema in the late '70s/early '80s.


    god bless Zia Padora!!!!!!!

     
     Posted:   Apr 7, 2014 - 8:07 PM   
     By:   Storyteller   (Member)

    How about a couple of unreleased comedies:



    Good choice, Storyteller. Love this movie.Great cast with Malcolm McDowall, Daniel Stern, Ed Begley Jr as Colin Beverly.

    Here's another one: Nightflyers with Catherine Mary Stewart and Michael Praed.

    Greg Espinoza





    And may I return the compliment... good pick with Nightflyers. I have a VCD of that film, but would love a remastered Blu-Ray or even a DVD of it.


     
     
     Posted:   Apr 7, 2014 - 8:26 PM   
     By:   dan the man   (Member)

    Immoral tales-76-I remember seeing this film in the movies and I remember one scene where there is about a 100 naked girls with great figures. erotic, but done in good taste.A movie called BOARDWALK- 80- Lee Strasberg.Le chat-73=A good drama with a nice phillipe sarde score etc,etc.

     
     
     Posted:   Apr 7, 2014 - 9:15 PM   
     By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

    LET IT BE – The Beatles’ final film opened about a month after Paul McCartney publicly announced that he was leaving the group. It was built around the band’s final live performance, which was filmed on 30 January 1969 on the rooftop of the Apple Corps building in London. The film also incorporates footage of Beatles’ recording sessions that was originally shot for a planned television special. The film hints at the dissension in the group that would lead to their eventual breakup, and much more of such footage was excised from the film before release.

    The Beatles won an Oscar for LET IT BE in the category "Original Song Score", which Quincy Jones accepted on their behalf. The film was released on VHS video, RCA SelectaVision videodisc, and laserdisc in the USA in the early 1980s, but has been unavailable since. Numerous bootlegs of the film can be found, all sourced from those early releases. Reportedly, Paul and Ringo are against any further release of the film, because they believe it would hurt The Beatles’ brand. We’re not likely to see the film during their lifetimes.


     
     
     Posted:   Apr 7, 2014 - 9:18 PM   
     By:   riotengine   (Member)

    [

    Another I would buy in an instant is the Jimmy Stewart film, Fool's Parade.


    You reminded me I saw this film in the theatre. It's the Davis Grubb novel that made it click. I honestly can't remember much about it but hey, Grubb wrote Night of the Hunter and it had that ominous atmosphere. Pretty interesting. Posted!

    I remember the film vividly from watching it at my Grandmother's on NBC's Saturday Night At The Movies. The cast is excellent; Jimmy Stewart, Strother Martin, George Kennedy, Kurt Russell, Anne Baxter, William Windom as dynamite salesman Roy K Sizemore, David Huddlestone as corrupt banker, Homer Grindstaff. What other name could he have, LOL. smile

    I read the Davis Grubb novel a few years back, and it's darker, but aside from a few minor omissions, the movie is pretty faithful to the book.

    Greg Espinoza

     
     
     Posted:   Apr 7, 2014 - 9:44 PM   
     By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

    I read the Davis Grubb novel [Fools' Parade] a few years back, and it's darker, but aside from a few minor omissions, the movie is pretty faithful to the book.


    The film's screenplay was by James Lee Barrett, who also has a small role in the film. Barrett had previously written the Jimmy Stewart films SHENANDOAH and BANDOLERO! (which, like FOOLS' PARADE, were both directed by Andrew V. McLaglen), and co-produced Stewart's THE CHEYENNE SOCIAL CLUB.

     
     
     Posted:   Apr 8, 2014 - 2:21 AM   
     By:   CinemaScope   (Member)

    I read the Davis Grubb novel [Fools' Parade] a few years back, and it's darker, but aside from a few minor omissions, the movie is pretty faithful to the book.


    The film's screenplay was by James Lee Barrett, who also has a small role in the film. Barrett had previously written the Jimmy Stewart films SHENANDOAH and BANDOLERO! (which, like FOOLS' PARADE, were both directed by Andrew V. McLaglen), and co-produced Stewart's THE CHEYENNE SOCIAL CLUB.


    It was released here in the UK as, The Dynamite Man From Glory Jail. Funny how it never even got a DVD release, after all we are talking James Stewart. I last saw it about two years ago on the telly, an old 4x3 transfer.

     
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