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 Posted:   Mar 2, 2006 - 5:10 AM   
 By:   dogplant   (Member)

Where are the new sci-fi writers that movies could be based on?


A few ideas (not all new writers):

I'd love to see someone tackle Lucius Shepard, "Life During Wartime," or his novella "The Jaguar Hunter" -- very passionate and trippy stuff, would be great for Ridley Scott: http://www.lucius-shepard.com/

No one has dared tried to film Iain Banks yet -- maybe Cronenberg? http://www.iainbanks.net/

Not a new writer, he died in 1987, but no one has so far been able to tackle the wacky but brilliant Alfred Bester. I remember Oliver Stone once supposedly adapted "The Demolished Man" as a screenplay, which Brian de Palma was attached to. And I believe John Carpenter was once circling "The Stars My Destination" / "Tiger Tiger" (depending on which side of the Atlantic you reside on). Both would still be fun and very off-the-wall, if done properly.

I also always thought Kurt Vonnegut's "Sirens of Titan" would make a fun movie, made by by someone with a brain and a sense of irony.

How about Harry Harrison's rollicking "The Stainless Steel Rat"? That would be a romp.

And Stanislaw Lem is still an untapped vein, a brilliant mind and very witty, despite what you might have gathered from the films of "Solaris."

I'm quite looking forward to the animated "A Scanner Darkly" and I was hoping David Fincher would follow through his promise of "Rendezvous With Rama," albeit animated again.

Lots of good stuff out there.

 
 Posted:   Mar 2, 2006 - 5:17 AM   
 By:   Jehannum   (Member)



Yikes. Have you read any Philip K. Dick, or J.G. Ballard?



No, but my sister has just finished a PK Dick book and she said it's sexist hogwash!

I've just started reading The Martian Chronicles again (after 20 years) though ... beautifully written indeed.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 2, 2006 - 2:12 PM   
 By:   LRobHubbard   (Member)

A lot of the sillier stuff gets old really quickly, and there's not a lot of patience for it, now at age 40... no matter how fond my memories of LOST IN SPACE, say, I think I'd find watching the second and third seasons really painful. Glen Larson 'sci-fi' was painful when it was first broadcast, and probably would cause a stroke if one sat through a non-stop marathon of GALACTICA/BUCK ROGERS.

That said, there's quite a bit out there that's still engaging.

 
 Posted:   Mar 2, 2006 - 2:38 PM   
 By:   dogplant   (Member)



No, but my sister has just finished a PK Dick book and she said it's sexist hogwash!

I've just started reading The Martian Chronicles again (after 20 years) though ... beautifully written indeed.


Yikes again, re: PKD. He's not everyone's taste, but I keep coming back to him over the years. I guess it's my paranoid predeliction for sexist hogwash.

"The Martian Chronicles" is one of my all-time favorites, and I don't think they came close with the 1980 Rock Hudson TV miniseries. I saw Bradbury speak about this book years ago and he mentioned that after he first saw "Lawrence of Arabia" he mailed a copy of "Chronicles" to David Lean. Lean's reply was, 'Sorry, not my cup of tea.' But the thought of that story told by that filmmaker has always stayed with me.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 2, 2006 - 3:13 PM   
 By:   Oblicno   (Member)

I'm about to start reading Brave New World by Aldous Huxley. I've never read anything by him, and was wondering if anyone had opinions on him.

The sci-fi i have read and enjoyed has mainly been clarke, wells, matheson, bradbury, so far.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 2, 2006 - 7:39 PM   
 By:   Jostein   (Member)



Yes, that was (and is) my implication.


Dude that is just baffling. Sorry but I don't understand that at all.

Sci fi is not only entertaining but it is important to philosophy and politics.

 
 Posted:   Mar 2, 2006 - 7:48 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

There is a diff between pulp/genre and literature.

Bradbury and Matheson (not really sf writers), Dick are great writers. Period.

But like other genres- romance, western, mystery-alot of sci-fi is just product.

Bruce Marshall

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 3, 2006 - 6:05 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

I've found that I still like sci fi very much, and it may still be my favourite film and literature genre. So I've not grown out of it at age 28. However, my taste has expanded and evolved throughout the years, so I can just as well gain satisfaction from seeing/reading a sociorealistic work or an historical epic or whatever.

 
 Posted:   Mar 3, 2006 - 11:11 AM   
 By:   Jehannum   (Member)

Bradbury and Matheson (not really sf writers

You know, I was just thinking the same thing when reading The Martian Chronicles. It isn't sci fi ... more like fantasy; maybe even anti-sci fi!

But the elements that make the genre what it is just don't interest me anymore: 'Space' appears to be a gigantic waste of ... well, space. Interplanetary wars - yawn. Klingon bellicosity and Vulcan lore - boring. Superstrings - messy.

The newest sci fi books that I've really liked are Iain M. Banks' Feersum Endjinn and Look to Windward.

 
 Posted:   Mar 28, 2006 - 1:28 PM   
 By:   dogplant   (Member)

Just wanted to resurrect this thread to add...

The great Stanislaw Lem has passed away:
http://tinyurl.com/kctnw



And per Variety, March 22, Alfred Bester's "The Stars My Destination" is getting a dust off:

Universal Pictures has acquired screen rights to The Stars My Destination, a 1955 Alfred Bester novel that's considered a seminal sci-fi work. Lorenzo di Bonaventura is producing with Raymond Wagner, says Variety. The protagonist is the sole survivor of a wrecked spaceship that drifts through deep space. When a passing vessel ignores his distress signal, he becomes obsessed with revenge and ultimately uncovers a secret destined to change the course of history.



 
 
 Posted:   Apr 3, 2006 - 7:49 PM   
 By:   Oblicno   (Member)



Has anyone read this book? Is it hard to locate? Is it any good?

 
 Posted:   Apr 3, 2006 - 8:02 PM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)




Has anyone read this book? Is it hard to locate? Is it any good?


It's a sci fi classic, I have it in hardcover- as to outgrowing science fiction, nope, I'm just not as ardent about it as I was in my youth- branched into other generes- (love Noir- movie and written).

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 3, 2006 - 8:06 PM   
 By:   Oblicno   (Member)

About 8 years ago i really got into Arthur C. Clarke's stuff, but never really read sci-fi on a regular basis. Recently i read 1984 and Brave New World and have recently become more interested in reading works in this vein, or anything decent i might have missed.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 3, 2006 - 8:50 PM   
 By:   Shatnervana   (Member)

"The Stars My Destination" really is one of the best SF novels you'll ever read.

As to "outgrowing" SF...well, sometimes tastes change. And sometimes, they change back. For years, I'd never even think about watching a cartoon, but "Batman: The Animated Series" and "Justice League" put the kibosh on that.

I've never thought of science fiction as a discrete genre, but as a theme. Think about it for a few minutes. You can have SF love stories, SF espionage, SF westerns, SF detective stories, SF drama, SF comedy, alternate history, space opera...science fiction/fantasy is easily the most flexible form of storytelling I can think of.

 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2006 - 1:58 PM   
 By:   dogplant   (Member)


Has anyone read this book? Is it hard to locate? Is it any good?


It's a fun romp, often been compared to a sci-fi "Count of Monte Cristo." The old paperback I had called it "widescreen Baroque scence fiction," which I thought appropriate. Gully Foyle is a memorable character. I preferred Bester's "The Demolished Man," but you can try it for yourself here:

http://tinyurl.com/l4o2p

Lem might be harder to get hold of. "Solaris" is his most famous novel and is a pretty trippy hard-sf story. If you liked Arthur Clarke, you might enjoy that. "The Cyberiad" and his Ijon Tichy stories are pretty wild, very intelligent and imaginative, published by Harvest Books. He also wrote some noir-ish detective fiction, which I've never read.

NP: Petulia (Barry)

 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2006 - 2:28 PM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)



I've never thought of science fiction as a discrete genre, but as a theme. Think about it for a few minutes. You can have SF love stories, SF espionage, SF westerns, SF detective stories, SF drama, SF comedy, alternate history, space opera...science fiction/fantasy is easily the most flexible form of storytelling I can think of.



That's an interesting perspective- I never thought of it quite that way. You're right, though. Most people hear science fiction and immediately think, "space opera"

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2006 - 8:55 PM   
 By:   Shatnervana   (Member)

FYI, Stanislaw Lem died just a week or so past.

 
 Posted:   Aug 12, 2014 - 8:10 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

It's eight years later...has anyone gone off sci-fi yet?

 
 Posted:   Aug 12, 2014 - 8:15 AM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

I'm not off of it, but I find much less of it to my taste. My interests have broadened beyond the genre and my tastes have been refined or at least defined.

 
 Posted:   Aug 12, 2014 - 8:18 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Always loved Sci Fi and always will. It's not the genre that has left me cold but the way films are made nowadays.

 
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