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 Posted:   May 4, 2010 - 10:45 AM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)



Now if only OKLAHOMA CRUDE, THE LAST RUN and THE SAVAGE IS LOOSE could be rescued from obscurity.

Richard


I managed to see "The Last Run" on TCM and it's a great movie. When "Hardcore" was on the bbc I stayed up for it and it was a good movie (I didn't realise Schrader directed it until later). The only Scott performance I didn't care for was "Firestarter".

 
 
 Posted:   May 4, 2010 - 12:49 PM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)







The ONE Scott Performance We Desperately Wanna See Department:

Aside from his appearance in “The Power and the Glory” with



is his absolutely SHATTERING characterization of the John Proctor



for all times (Daniel-Day Whoooo?) in the 1967 teevee version of “The Crucible”.



We once caught a brief glimpse of the final scene when Proctor refuses to save his life by telling a lie to the witch-hunting (literally) vigilantes of Salem, Massachusetts, and the searing intensity Mr. Scott unleashes with his blistering “Because it is MY NAME!!!!!!” still royally registers with its Promethean glory e’en now.

 
 Posted:   May 4, 2010 - 12:55 PM   
 By:   msmith   (Member)

nice to see this appreciation of George C. Scott, whose work has always meant a lot to me.

Recently i added RAGE (1972) to my collection of Scott DVD's, from the Warner Archives series. I've got everything he's in that's available.

Now if only OKLAHOMA CRUDE, THE LAST RUN and THE SAVAGE IS LOOSE could be rescued from obscurity.

Richard



I'd also like to get BANK SHOT redone in letterboxed 2.35:1 aspect ratio. The DVD has it in the films credits only.

 
 
 Posted:   May 4, 2010 - 1:01 PM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)

Like we said once upon a matrix, when Da Watcher



deigns to enter the conversational fray, ya KNOW somethin’s optimistically up – mucho obliged, Dana-san (not to down-play all the other foundational fans of Mr. Scott paying their titled tribute to the extraordinary essence of his muscular gift).

We share your admiration for “Islands” for, among many things, it contains one of the greatest and most subtly tragic acting scenes ever captured on celluloid … that masterly sequence when estranged wife Claire Bloom



is about to tell him of the death of their son -



and Mr. Scott (seen from behind) slowwwwwly places his hand behind his head as the enormity of the news he’s already intuited settles inside him.

No shouting, no screaming, no over-the-top hay-lookit-me-see-how-intense-I-can-get histrionics: simply the quietly enveloping realization a parent’s worst nightmare has become all too real.

There are few moments of when the craft of acting attains the creative artistry it so rarely achieves it literally takes your breath away,



but, by gar, this was one of ‘em.

 
 Posted:   May 4, 2010 - 8:24 PM   
 By:   Dana Wilcox   (Member)

I've never not believed a Scott performance!

I think you may have outdone yourself with this thread, Neo. Might I add that your return to our virtual environs comes not a moment too soon -- just as the trolls, flamers, grenade throwers and kvetchers threatened to storm the western gates. The stern visage of George C. Scott has sent the scalawags running back to their mothers' skirts!

 
 Posted:   Oct 18, 2010 - 12:32 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Today would have been George C. Scott's 83rd birthday.

 
 Posted:   Oct 18, 2010 - 12:35 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

From the (all-knowing) IMDB:

Scott and Marlon Brando played chess together while shooting The Formula (1980). In his Playboy interview of December 1980 (Vol. 27, Iss. 12, pg. 81- 138), Scott told Lawrence Grobel -- who had conducted the famous interview with Brando for Playboy a year earlier -- that Marlon was not that good a player. Many years later, Christiane Kubrick leveled the same charge against Scott, who was beaten regularly by her late husband Stanley Kubrick on the set of Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) between setups. Kubrick, however, was renowned as a master-level chess player who used to hustle other players in his youth in New York City.

 
 Posted:   Oct 18, 2010 - 12:52 PM   
 By:   PhiladelphiaSon   (Member)

Appropriately, given the time of year, Scott stars in my two favorite horror films.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 18, 2010 - 6:35 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

Does anybody remember that George C. Scott directed the original Broadway production of "The Andersonville Trial" (and I think he directed the version for Public Television, now available as part of Image Entertainment's "Broadway Theatre Archive", and was the first primetime Public Television program of any kind to win an Emmy award)?

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 18, 2010 - 11:42 PM   
 By:   Tobias   (Member)

As a Swede I thought it was hilarious that one of his last roles was in the boxing drama Tyson. The reason why I find this hilarious is because there is a Swede who is a boxer who goes by the name of George Scott, that`s true.

Anyway he was a fantastic actor nevertheless.

 
 Posted:   Oct 19, 2010 - 6:41 AM   
 By:   Loren   (Member)

Yes he was a fantastic actor. I also appreciated him when he slapped the hollywood establishment by means of his refusal of the Oscar. One thing I've never liked is his hoarse voice. That's why I've always preferred him dubbed!

 
 Posted:   Oct 19, 2010 - 6:45 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Yes he was a fantastic actor....One thing I've never liked is his hoarse voice. That's why I've always preferred him dubbed!

Yeah, that's how I feel about John Wayne, Humphrey Bogart, James Cagney, Bette Davis, Katharine Hepburn, and Cary Grant--fantastic actors, but someone puh-leese get Paul Frees to speak their lines!

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 19, 2010 - 8:09 AM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)



Mr. Scott was part of the original Broadway production



before Helm-ing (not Matt wink) the critically-acclaimed PBS version.









Vis-à-vis the Scott-Brando Acting Duet Department:

We recall an interview producer-writer Steve Shagan gave around the tyme of the film’s original 1980 release
how he felt considerable chagrin watching these two behemoths in their two separate sequences together
and having overwhelming sadness at the enormous unfulfilled potential their careers (individually and in tandem)
evoked.



Everyone’s well aware that’s a familiar refrain (not that we’ve ever totally bought the theory) usually associated
with Mr. Brando but that was the first instance we ever heard it attached to the titled subject of this thread. eek

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 19, 2010 - 12:51 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)



Mr. Scott was part of the original Broadway production



before Helm-ing (not Matt wink) the critically-acclaimed PBS version.









Vis-à-vis the Scott-Brando Acting Duet Department:

We recall an interview producer-writer Steve Shagan gave around the tyme of the film’s original 1980 release
how he felt considerable chagrin watching these two behemoths in their two separate sequences together
and having overwhelming sadness at the enormous unfulfilled potential their careers (individually and in tandem)
evoked.



Everyone’s well aware that’s a familiar refrain (not that we’ve ever totally bought the theory) usually associated
with Mr. Brando but that was the first instance we ever heard it attached to the titled subject of this thread. eek



Watch "The Andersonville Trial". It's magnificent!!!

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 19, 2010 - 4:46 PM   
 By:   bulleteyes   (Member)

I've enjoyed reading this thread about Mr. Scott. I have been a fan of his most of my life. By the time he made the film, "The Hospital" I was convinced the man could roar down the sky if he had it in his mind to do so.

One odd little film that most have not seen is 1987's "Pals". There is one scene where the rough, tough retired military man Scott finds his mother, played up by Sylvia Sidney, is in jeopardy. In a wonderfully timed comic moment he melts down to a hand flapping, sobbing wreck. He was a marvel.

I do miss him.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 19, 2010 - 5:26 PM   
 By:   Richard-W   (Member)

After reading this thread a few weeks ago I bought a short stack of George C. Scott's films on DVD to fill in the gaps in my Scott collection, including some lesser-known titles which I had not seen:

Hardcore -- I really dislike this film but Scott's performance is bloody as hell.
The Changeling

A Christmas Carol
Taps
China Rose
Family Rescue
Choices
Descending Angel
The Last Days of Patton


His performances in these small cable films are as giving and as meticulous as in the big feature films.

Richard

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 20, 2010 - 11:13 AM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)









It goes without saying no one ever actually DIRECTED George C. Scott; his unerring instincts were enuff for those properly attuned to simply get outta his way and allow his intuitive intelligence and anchored artistry to bring forth the bounty of whatever was needed –as here where he taps into the absurd truth of his character and, by playing him absolutely straight, accentuates and elevates his profound paranoia into perversely attractive – and humorous – hilarity.



For Rich … and a sincere salute to your strikingly articulate assessment of the following film which you shared with
FSM Assembled in your above perceptive post:





[ Equalizing Appreciatory Personally-Professional Note Department: We also wish we could’ve thanked Mr. Scott for agreeing to headline this exceptional British remake ‘cause if he hadn’t, it never would’ve served as our seminally impressive introduction to Edward Woodward. ]





As to that, whilst others may have their own hallmarks as Scrooge, anyone who watches this dast not
include Mr. Scott among posterity's favorites.









Now here’s something we forgot to remember (or overlooked that we were even aware of), which is the 1987 series
Mr. Scott (admittedly for purely mercenary means) briefly headlined (with Lynn Carlin below





and the irreplaceable Madeline Kahn - and didja catch who the co-producer was?!? smile).



and then, of course, there’s the peerless



And you might wanna peruse the first warts-and-wonder biography of the actor



 
 
 Posted:   Oct 20, 2010 - 3:36 PM   
 By:   Marcato   (Member)

wow this man suddenly know how to get involved with films scored by Goldsmith.

 
 Posted:   Oct 20, 2010 - 3:48 PM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

Who could ever forget the soldier who gets slapped. Not to forget the guy who does the slapping.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 20, 2010 - 6:03 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)









It goes without saying no one ever actually DIRECTED George C. Scott; his unerring instincts were enuff for those properly attuned to simply get outta his way and allow his intuitive intelligence and anchored artistry to bring forth the bounty of whatever was needed –as here where he taps into the absurd truth of his character and, by playing him absolutely straight, accentuates and elevates his profound paranoia into perversely attractive – and humorous – hilarity.



For Rich … and a sincere salute to your strikingly articulate assessment of the following film which you shared with
FSM Assembled in your above perceptive post:





[ Equalizing Appreciatory Personally-Professional Note Department: We also wish we could’ve thanked Mr. Scott for agreeing to headline this exceptional British remake ‘cause if he hadn’t, it never would’ve served as our seminally impressive introduction to Edward Woodward. ]





As to that, whilst others may have their own hallmarks as Scrooge, anyone who watches this dast not
include Mr. Scott among posterity's favorites.









Now here’s something we forgot to remember (or overlooked that we were even aware of), which is the 1987 series
Mr. Scott (admittedly for purely mercenary means) briefly headlined (with Lynn Carlin below





and the irreplaceable Madeline Kahn - and didja catch who the co-producer was?!? smile).



and then, of course, there’s the peerless



And you might wanna peruse the first warts-and-wonder biography of the actor





I thought the shortlived sitcom was called "Mr. President".

 
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