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 Posted:   Feb 7, 2007 - 2:24 PM   
 By:   Oblicno   (Member)

Oblicno, it is a long, long read. If you do read it, let us know what you think.

aye, aye, will do.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 7, 2007 - 5:35 PM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

For Thor: When I was reading HUNT FOR RED OCTOBER, I loved the plot and characters; however, the author spent many pages detailing how to work a nuclear submarine, and I wasn't interested in so many details. As much as I liked THE TERROR, the author tended to go on and on and on with minute details about the ships' structures and other details that slowed down my reading. However, other readers may really enjoy those details.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 7, 2007 - 6:37 PM   
 By:   Thread Assasin   (Member)

"The Meaning of Night: A Confession" by Michael Cox.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2007 - 7:49 PM   
 By:   David in NY   (Member)

ATTN. CAT & JOAN HUE (and others who enjoyed 'Lonesome Dove'):
Joan - you've read 'Lonesome Dove'. (and loved the character of Augustus)
Cat - you're about to start your own adventure in reading 'Lonesome Dove'.
Well, I felt a 'hole' at the ending of 'Lonesome Dove' and found out there are MORE books in 'The Lonesome Dove Series'. It's being billed as 'The Lonesome Dove TETRALOGY. After reading Lonesome Dove (Book 3), you should go immediately to (Book 1) 'DEAD MAN'S WALK'. The characters are back, but they're around 18 or 19 years old. After this book, go to (Book 2) 'COMANCHE MOON'. and then the FINAL chapter is the true sequel to Lonesome Dove, (Book 4) 'STREETS OF LAREDO'. Evidentally Book 4 is the sequel to Lonesome Dove; however AFTER FINISHING 'Lonesome Dove', you have to go BACK to revisit them when they were Young ('Dead Man's Walk' and 'Commanche Moon') BEFORE ending it all with the final sequel of 'STREETS OF LAREDO'. I hope this makes some sort of sense.
In any event, my book selections are now STACKED beside my bed and I know what I'll be reading for the rest of 2007!

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2007 - 8:04 PM   
 By:   Bond1965   (Member)

I'm actually "listening" to Augusten Burrough's RUNNING WITH SCISSORS. It's quite funny in a dark sort of way and his reading of it is very witty.

James

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2007 - 8:26 PM   
 By:   David in NY   (Member)

I'm actually "listening" to Augusten Burrough's RUNNING WITH SCISSORS. It's quite funny in a dark sort of way and his reading of it is very witty.

James


James - 'LISTENING' to a book?
You are hereby banished to Kazakhstan. No, wait, Signal Hill, California!

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2007 - 11:41 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

For Thor: When I was reading HUNT FOR RED OCTOBER, I loved the plot and characters; however, the author spent many pages detailing how to work a nuclear submarine, and I wasn't interested in so many details. As much as I liked THE TERROR, the author tended to go on and on and on with minute details about the ships' structures and other details that slowed down my reading. However, other readers may really enjoy those details.

I see. A bit like what Michael Crichton often does, right?

While I rarely have interest in all the technical and superficial details that certain authors dwell with, I actually PREFER books that spend a great deal of time on mood and atmosphere in general (where no or little "narrative" is going on). My own (unreleased) novels, for example, usually start off with long "poetic" descriptions of the setting before anything happens. It's all about getting the reader engrossed in the place and time to the extent that you can almost breathe the air and smell the flowers. THEN the action enters, and quite up-tempo too.

 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2007 - 12:13 PM   
 By:   scorechaser   (Member)

"The Five Ages of the Universe: Inside the Physics of Eternity" by Fred Adams and Greg Laughlin.

Great Read!

Philipp

np: "planet of the apes" (danny elfman)

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2007 - 2:14 PM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

John Lukacs: BUDAPEST 1900
Kati Marton: THE GREAT ESCAPE: Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed the World

In preparation for my centennial pilgrimage to the land of the maestro's birth. Neither book mentions Rozsa, but they have much to tell us about his cultural milieu

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 12, 2007 - 2:23 AM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

Hey David, I had heard that the prequels and sequel to LONESOME DOVE were not that great, so I avoided them. I could be wrong. If you enjoy those books, let me know, and maybe I'll revisit those novels.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 29, 2007 - 10:58 AM   
 By:   Montana Dave   (Member)

After reading 'Lonesome Dove', I went to the next book of the series (to follow the characters in the first book chronologically, afterwards) that book is 'Dead Man's Walk' and it goes BACK in time to where the first books characters (then old) are teenagers and meet one another for the first time. Though not quite as good as 'Lonesome Dove', it was still quite a page turner with many, many exciting and vivid and violent events. You get to meet Augustus McCrae and Woodrow Call and Clara all as teenagers. (We the readers know what's in store for them, but they don't, and this makes for a lively read!) Very worthwhile (Joan Hue check it out!)
After 'Dead Man's Walk' I felt I needed something different and selected 'A Short History of the Dead'. A highly unusual novel about where people go to after they die. They go to a place (New York?) and continue there indefinately UNTILL the last person on earth who remembered them in their memories dies as well, then they move on to 'the next place'. But then suddenly all the people on Earth start to be die off in a rapidly spreading plague that is devestating this 'middle world's' occupants...... sounds unusual and it was. Sort of an 'On The Beach' for The Dead, if that makes any sense.
Currently reading the 3rd novel in the 'Lonesome Dove' series - 'COMMANCHE MOON' and here, the Lonesome Dove characters are in their middle years, and feisty as ever. This book is nearly as long as Lonesome Dove was. It will not be finished here in New York but will be finished sometime after I move to Montana - which is probably fitting!

 
 Posted:   Mar 29, 2007 - 11:11 AM   
 By:   scorechaser   (Member)

A biography about James Cook. Fascinating stuff.

Philipp

 
 Posted:   Mar 29, 2007 - 11:28 AM   
 By:   Ray Faiola   (Member)

Tunes For 'Toons by Daniel Goldmark. Interesting that in his discussion for swing/jazz related cartoons he doesn't mention MGM's SWING WEDDING.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 29, 2007 - 12:07 PM   
 By:   Oblicno   (Member)

I'm reading The Nutmeg of Consolation, the 14th abrey/maturin book and it's the best yet - fighting malay pirates, and nipping off to the crims in New South Wales, the hell-hole!

Going to buy the next in the series CLARISSA OAKES tonight.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 29, 2007 - 12:12 PM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

Call For The Saint - Leslie Charteris

...great fun (the older stories are much better than the later ones which became far too PC)

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 29, 2007 - 2:16 PM   
 By:   Donna   (Member)

Finishing up "Namath" and about to start Susan Cheever's (John's daughter) biography "My Name is Bill". A friend told me it was a fascinating and different side of the AA founder's life story. I'm not in the program, but I loved the movie with James Woods and James Garner.

 
 Posted:   Mar 29, 2007 - 9:12 PM   
 By:   TominAtl   (Member)

"Enders Games" by Orson Scott Card.

It's an old sci-fi classic and winner of some awards, I am half way through and though it is an interesting premise, I am not compelled to finish it, though I will. My main issue with it is that the main characters, elementary school kids, have too rich of dialogues with each other an deep introspection that I find hard to believe. But again the premise is fascinating, which is that in the future, after 2 devestating wars with aliens, the Earth figures out that making children into soldiers to bring out their "genius" will turn the tide in the next war.

It has some sophomoric prose and dialogue but overall a decent story and read. *** so far.

I see that there are 2 sequels. I will decide after reading this one if the others are worth pursuing.

Tom

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 30, 2007 - 6:23 AM   
 By:   JSWalsh   (Member)

Blue Paradise--Matt Bloom Really enjoyed this novel about a boxer/bartender who's given the chance to throw a fight. Very atmosphereic, not a very compelling plot but very entertaining.

Men in Black--Scott Spenser He seems more interested in being cranky about being a writer than anything.

Starting Out in the Evening--Brian Morton Very entertaining novel about an aging writer and the young chippy trying to figure out why his last books sucked. Aimed at the New Yorker crowd but Morton's characters grow on you.

The Devil's Guide to Hollywood--Joe Eszterhas Better than his scripts. Bite-sized comments and gossip.

I've been reading many books lately, and these are a few that stick out. My favorite book of the last month:

A Tragic Honesty-The Life and Work of Richard Yates--Blake Bailey Recommended to any would-be writer. Sometimes gruelling telling of a writer's writer who never caught on with the public. If Decaprio (BADLY cast) makes the movie of Yates' Revolutionary Road, maybe Yates will get some posthumous acclaim.

Do As I Say (Not As I Do): Profiles in Liberal Hypocrisy--Peter Schweizer Good timing, considering the recent Al Gore fiasco.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 30, 2007 - 7:07 AM   
 By:   JSWalsh   (Member)

When the Light Goes--Larry McMurtry

I didn't even know he was writing a follow-up to Duane's Depressed when I saw this and grabbed it...

Very disappointing. I was thrilled to have a chance to spend more time with the characters from Picture Show/Texasville (one of the most FUN novels ever)/Duane's, but this was less than 200 pages, ignored some great characters, misused some others, and spent time on characters I had no interest in.

Write another one, Larry, and give Duane a REAL Texas-sized sendoff.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 30, 2007 - 9:42 AM   
 By:   Thread Assasin   (Member)

Montana Dave wrote "...felt I needed something different and selected 'A Short History of the Dead'. A highly unusual novel about where people go to after they die. They go to a place (New York?) and continue there indefinately UNTILL the last person on earth who remembered them in their memories dies as well, then they move on to 'the next place'. But then suddenly all the people on Earth start to be die off in a rapidly spreading plague that is devestating this 'middle world's' occupants...... sounds unusual and it was. Sort of an 'On The Beach' for The Dead, if that makes any sense."

This sounds very interesting. I'm putting it on my list. Thanks for the recommendation.

Currently reading "Sweet Poison," by David Roberts, first in the Lord Edward Corinth/Verity Browne mystery series. 1930s setting -- Sayersesque, and fun.

 
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