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 Posted:   Jun 9, 2012 - 6:05 AM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

"A man's gotta do whatta man's gotta do."



Melty. The correct term is melted.

Disagreed. Melted refers to a physical transition, from a solid to a liquid state. Melty refers to the tactile experience of that molten state, often of cheese but occasionally of a sweet like chocolate or ice cream.

I have a gripe with movie reviewers calling a film "an achievement." The usage is not wrong, but it sounds pompous.

All we need to do is started referring to mundane things that way. Like, walk out of the WC and refer to your latest bowel movement as a "magnificent achievement". Sooner or later I suppose people will stop referring to things as achievements!

 
 Posted:   Jun 21, 2012 - 5:02 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

"The folks."

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 28, 2012 - 9:26 AM   
 By:   steve jongeward   (Member)

"The Best Film Of The Year"!

A movie opens in February of the New Year - and the ad campaign will say - 'the BEST film of the year'! I ask - how does that work? For any film to be the BEST of the YEAR - the year would have to be done - and all the other released films would have to be considered! Really bugs me!

"boots on the ground" - 'Steve, what we'd really like is for you to be our boots on the ground out there and win one for the gipper'!

 
 Posted:   Jun 28, 2012 - 9:29 AM   
 By:   David Sones (Allardyce)   (Member)

Adding the word thing to any/all events. The divorce thing. The job thing. The soundtrack collecting thing. How does adding that word create any benefit of understanding? WORTHLESS!

 
 Posted:   Jun 28, 2012 - 5:50 PM   
 By:   David Sones (Allardyce)   (Member)

BRM, your comments were deleted. Do you really want to poison a thread that's been running for such a long time? Knock it off.

 
 Posted:   Jul 1, 2012 - 2:58 PM   
 By:   random guy   (Member)

"there are two kinds of people in this world". really hate that phrase, if it's true then how come the two kinds of people keep changing

 
 Posted:   Jul 1, 2012 - 7:44 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

"My friend", being used to address someone who is NOT your friend.

"Yes, if you can just wait an additional 30 minutes beyond the promised delivery time, my friend, it will get there."

 
 Posted:   Jul 4, 2012 - 6:08 PM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

The use of "unbelievable" as a superlative:

"Marion Cotillard's performace as Edith Piaf was unbelievable."

Wait...what? Do you mean was she unbelievably good or that she was unconvincing as Piaf?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 5, 2012 - 5:15 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

Cheese is robust. A business process is not.


Cheese isn't robust - cheese is crumbly, smooth, sharp, hard, smelly.

A business process that stands firm in the face of extraneous pressures such as user stupidity or hacking absolutely is ROBUST, the best word for it. When applied to something like cheese or wine it's just poncy, sorry smile

Don't often disagree with you, Ally old boy, but this is one such occasion!


EDIT - and now all the above is pointless... frown

Oh well, what the hell (a phrase that needs to go away)

 
 Posted:   Jul 5, 2012 - 5:28 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

"Johnny Depp"
The phrase needs to go away permanently, for good and forever.


Richard




I smile every time I read this post. Its honesty amuses the hell out of me. big grin

 
 Posted:   Jul 5, 2012 - 2:42 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

BRM, your comments were deleted. Do you really want to poison a thread that's been running for such a long time? Knock it off.


???????!!!!!!!!!!!

 
 Posted:   Jul 5, 2012 - 3:21 PM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

"there are two kinds of people in this world". really hate that phrase, if it's true then how come the two kinds of people keep changing

There are two kinds of people in the world: those who say things like "there are two kinds of people in the world," and those who know that the first kind are full of crap! big grin

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 5, 2012 - 4:22 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

AWESOME is starting to get a bit overused.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 11, 2012 - 10:04 PM   
 By:   tex1272   (Member)

One phrase I hear too much is when someone is holding a crying baby and an observer says "Quit pinching that baby!"

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 11, 2012 - 11:12 PM   
 By:   Jon Broxton   (Member)

One phrase I hear too much is when someone is holding a crying baby and an observer says "Quit pinching that baby!"

I have never heard anyone say that in my entire life.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2012 - 12:09 AM   
 By:   MusicMaker   (Member)

"there are two kinds of people in this world". really hate that phrase, if it's true then how come the two kinds of people keep changing

Not that this really matters (I have no horse in this race), but for what it's worth, the phrase is logical and "correct." It just describes binary conditions/situations/variables- where a person can only possibly be in one group or the other (they're mutually exclusive). There are lots of these variables that can be described.

For example:
There are two kinds of people in this world: those who are at least 6 feet tall and those who aren't.
or
There are two kinds of people in this world: those who don't have a problem with this phrase and those who do.

Clearly, you are the latter. wink

But yeah- there's no logical (or grammatical, or other) reason why the phrase can't be used at different times to describe different situations or ways of grouping people in mutually exclusive sub-groups.

Now if you don't like the phrase because you hear it too often or for some other reason, then that's another story...

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2012 - 3:32 AM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

There are two kinds of people in the world: those who walk to work and those who carry their lunch.

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2012 - 4:11 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

"The wall has done its job."

They say it in Football after every deflected free kick; enough already.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2012 - 4:37 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

"The wall has done its job."

They say it in Football after every deflected free kick; enough already.


An excellent point, Jim. But if you're going to bring football into it, there should be a whole subtopic for it:

"game of two halves"
"die for the shirt"
"obviously" (muttered at the start of each sentence by barely sentient footballers)
"give 110%"
"covers every blade of grass"
"M*nch*st*r Un*t*d" (can't even bring myself to type it) wink

 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2012 - 1:04 PM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

Misusing "macro", as in

"Looking at this in the macro....."

 
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