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 Posted:   Mar 30, 2007 - 10:22 AM   
 By:   Montana Dave   (Member)

Montana Dave wrote "...felt I needed something different and selected 'A Short History of the Dead'. A highly unusual novel about where people go to after they die. They go to a place (New York?) and continue there indefinately UNTILL the last person on earth who remembered them in their memories dies as well, then they move on to 'the next place'. But then suddenly all the people on Earth start to be die off in a rapidly spreading plague that is devestating this 'middle world's' occupants...... sounds unusual and it was. Sort of an 'On The Beach' for The Dead, if that makes any sense."

This sounds very interesting. I'm putting it on my list. Thanks for the recommendation.

Currently reading "Sweet Poison," by David Roberts, first in the Lord Edward Corinth/Verity Browne mystery series. 1930s setting -- Sayersesque, and fun.


Hi. It was the COVER art-work that originally got my attention. How many times have we (any of us) picked up a book to examine it more closely BECAUSE the artwork or photo on the cover got our attention?) If you are seeking something truly different, pick up this book and read all the mini reviews on the back and inside the cover, I did and bought it. It's challenging! Imaginge a world not unlike a continually changing New York City where people go AFTER they die. They hold jobs, eat, have accidents, love, go to films, etc, etc, except that they don't have a heartbeat anymore- they are dead.And they know they are dead - they all recall their deaths. They hypothesize about 'where' they are and when someone they know vanishes, it's assumed they go 'on' to the next place. It's assumed they remain in 'the city' while still held in the memory of anyone still alive. There are sometimes generations of families there. It's interesting and goes back and forth from this world of the living to the other world. And there is a definate resemblence to 'On The Beach', in a twisted kind of way.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 1, 2007 - 10:28 PM   
 By:   Alex Klein   (Member)

The 400th post by Alex Klein.

And to stay with the topic, i'm currently reading:

- Satie Remembered (Robert Orledge)
- Erik Satie (Rollo Myers)
- Debussy Remembered (Roger Nichols - spanish version).

I already finished Satie Seen Through His Letters, which is a beautiful book on the composer's fascinating life.
All highly recommended.

Alex

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 2, 2007 - 12:36 AM   
 By:   Michael Arlidge   (Member)

I'm currently reading 'The Freedom Writers Diary'. I saw the film last week, and immediately sought out the text on which it's based. I'm only up to the tenth student entry, but already I'm amazed. Anyone who thinks their life sucks should read this book. These kids (who are about the same age as my younger brother) risk getting blown away just by stepping out their front door, yet their outlook on life is inspiring. They want to lead a better life, and are determined to prevail. I have no doubt they will.

 
 Posted:   Apr 25, 2007 - 1:47 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Baby, I Don't Care, Lee Server's Robert Mitchum bio is an interesting read with many of Mitchum's antics alternately shocking and hilarious. Recommended to all Mitchum fanatics (are there even any here?)

I'm about 220 pages into the book and read all about Mitchum's drug bust, which took place in 1948, though the book doesn't always let the reader know the year, which is a bit annoying.

 
 Posted:   Apr 25, 2007 - 3:36 PM   
 By:   WesllDeckers   (Member)

Currently (in between various 'study' books about art) "Berlin AlexanderPlatz". In its original Dutch translation of the 1920s.

Up next: the third book in the bundled Complete works of Franz Kafka!!

...also reading the Sibelius manual
...and a selection of Salvador DalĂ­'s writings in "My life as a genius". Genius title!!


wow, this my readinglist of may 2005.
almost 2 years down the road I have finished Berlin Alexanderplatz (just yesterday!!) which was a fantastic book.

I will start on a book by Dutchman Jan Wolkers soon, and occasionally read a chapter of a massive Stanley Kubrick book by Taschen.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 25, 2007 - 3:50 PM   
 By:   John B. Archibald   (Member)

The new J.R.R.Tolkien book, "The Children of Hurin."

The essential tale is part of "The Silmarillion," but it has been expanded by Tokien's son, Christopher, into book-length form, with illustrations by Alan Lee, who designed the look of the films.

I buy any Tolkien book, even though this story is pretty bleak.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 25, 2007 - 6:00 PM   
 By:   Thread Assasin   (Member)

"Blitz: The Story of December 29, 1940" by Margaret Gaskin.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 25, 2007 - 8:14 PM   
 By:   Montana Dave   (Member)

I'm currently reading 'The Freedom Writers Diary'. I saw the film last week, and immediately sought out the text on which it's based. I'm only up to the tenth student entry, but already I'm amazed. Anyone who thinks their life sucks should read this book. These kids (who are about the same age as my younger brother) risk getting blown away just by stepping out their front door, yet their outlook on life is inspiring. They want to lead a better life, and are determined to prevail. I have no doubt they will.
DVD is out here in NYC Michael - how was the film? Hilary Swank, right?

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 25, 2007 - 8:17 PM   
 By:   Montana Dave   (Member)

Now that I'm not taking the Subways on a daily basis, my reading has gone way down; but mostly because I'm still packing and cleaning the place before I leave on Tuesday. However, I am still reading Larry McMurtry's 'COMMANCHE MOON' which is part of The Lonesome Dove 'Tetrology'. It's a very exciting book, and I'll be reading it when I get to Montana too!

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 25, 2007 - 9:45 PM   
 By:   franz_conrad   (Member)

The new J.R.R.Tolkien book, "The Children of Hurin."

The essential tale is part of "The Silmarillion," but it has been expanded by Tokien's son, Christopher, into book-length form, with illustrations by Alan Lee, who designed the look of the films.

I buy any Tolkien book, even though this story is pretty bleak.


I'm looking forward to reading this (waiting for soft-cover), being familiar with the diverse bits and pieces that have appeared in THE BOOK OF LOST TALES, UNFINISHED TALES, LAYS OF BELERIAND and other collections. Of all Tolkien's stories, I feel it is the one that I wish I had the cinematic resources to tell. Nienor's realisation of her husband's history is a moment that I feel would never be done justice by most directors.

Now reading:

- Just finished Royal S Brown's FILM MUSINGS - like Forrest Gump, except with Forrest rewritten as a cynical film-filmusic critic, and the 30 years of American history condensed into film music history. Still, a brilliant commentator on the art, and one whose thoughts I have greatly valued while reading.

- Now onto Brown's OVERTONES AND UNDERTONES, which is an interesting comparison to Brown's anthology of reviews. Less editorial and more academic in intent, I feel it has enriched my thinking on film music - part. with reference to the mythic sense bestowed by film music on the cinematic image. I don't quite buy the intent to follow the pattern of the Orphic myth in Double Indemnity, but I suppose it could be true on an unconscious level.

- Also reading Michel Chion's AUDIO-VISION for the second time, having need for the author's rich insights into the aesthetics of sound design. He's an amazing author - I recently also read his VOICE AND THE CINEMA (recently translated to English) for the first time.

- Christopher Priest's THE PRESTIGE, and some non-fiction books await my attention - PAPILLON, FATELESS, and others.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 26, 2007 - 11:02 PM   
 By:   JSWalsh   (Member)

FAKING IT-The Quest for Authenticity in Popular Music by Hugh Barker and Yuval Taylor

Interesting comment by Ry Cooder about the phony singer-songwriters of the 70's made me pick this up.


WHY I TURNED RIGHT-Various

Essays on why some younger conservatives chose to turn right.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 27, 2007 - 11:45 AM   
 By:   Donna   (Member)

Just finished "My Name is Bill" by Susan Cheever. Wonderful biography of the founder of AA; it read like a novel. Also had great photos.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 27, 2007 - 1:46 PM   
 By:   Greg Bryant   (Member)

The No Asshole Rule: Building a Civilized Workplace and Surviving One That Isn't by Robert I. Sutton

 
 Posted:   Apr 27, 2007 - 3:15 PM   
 By:   LeHah   (Member)

Im trying to read the Spider-Man 3 novelization but Peter David's writing never sits well with me for some reason.

 
 Posted:   Apr 27, 2007 - 5:19 PM   
 By:   Dana Wilcox   (Member)

Baby, I Don't Care, Lee Server's Robert Mitchum bio is an interesting read with many of Mitchum's antics alternately shocking and hilarious. Recommended to all Mitchum fanatics (are there even any here?)

I'm about 220 pages into the book and read all about Mitchum's drug bust, which took place in 1948, though the book doesn't always let the reader know the year, which is a bit annoying.


An immensely enjoyable book, I thought, though I was ultimately disappointed in what Mitchum evolved into in his latter years. My favorite story was his on-set comment to Loretta Young during the shooting of a film they were doing together. (You may not have gotten there yet so I won't spoil it for you.) Despite all, Robert Mitchum was beyond a doubt one of the most talented natural actors ever, and his performances were almost always interesting.

 
 Posted:   Apr 28, 2007 - 6:36 PM   
 By:   TominAtl   (Member)

CELL by Stephen King

To be honest, I haven't read a King book in years. I've always felt his best work was in the 70's thru the early 80's. His writing was lean and mean and very scary. But after he wrote IT, I always felt his writing became bloated, redundant and a bit lazy. His best works were his non-fiction, like ON WRITING. And he also veered off his hardcore horror material. So when I got CELL, it seemed he went back to his roots of pure horror.

Overall, the book is a hit and miss. It starts off quickly but weak. He then hits a great stride for the middle act and he reminded me of his early, better years. Though the story is remmiscent of a Romero zombie flick, of which he makes references to, he adds his own touch and even throws in a VERY interesting twist to those who were "pulsed" while talking on their cellphones. But his climax and finale is very abrupt, weak and disappointing. He was seemingly on his way to a very distubing, "I am Legend" style of ending and then tosses it for a more "populist" style ending. There is a great build up and then it seems like he got cold feet and quickly made a ending that makes one go "WTF!?"

What could have been vintage King ended up being an interesting idea that ended up feeling half baked.

6 out of 10

Tom

 
 Posted:   Jun 2, 2007 - 1:51 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Just finished The Big Sleep and really enjoyed it, having finally purged both the '46 and '78 films from memory.

I just checked out "Florida's Hurricane History", which is fitting, now that it's hurricane season. As a lifelong Floridian this is the kind of reference source that will better familiarize me with my state's "heritage."wink The book goes year by year and shows the path of a given storm and the damage, etc. Recommended.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 3, 2007 - 5:34 AM   
 By:   JSWalsh   (Member)

I've been plowing through books lately:

"The Digger's Game" by George V. Higgins Is he even READ anymore? Would appeal to fans of Elmore Leonard and Robert Parker. A slim, quick journey to early 70's Boston crime and punishment (for some).

"The Painted Word" by Tom Wolfe Both a brief history and a demolition of the New York art scene of mid-century.

"Dashiell Hammett" by Diane Johnson Boring, and Johnson writes at a distance--I felt like I was trying to watch a documentary on Hammett while sitting behind a row of tall people, constantly trying to see over their heads and finally just giving up.

"After Silence" by Jonathan Carroll Another of Carroll's amazing and amazingly frustrating novels. His endings, simply put, suck, and make the whole reading experience a letdown, though I turn pages rapidly while getting to the disappointing finale.

"Windblown World" by Jack Kerouac Excerpts from his diaries during the periods when he was writing The Town and the City and On the Road. Brilliant, inspiring stuff, am picking at it a few pages at a time--not to be rushed through.

"On Writing and Writers" by John Gardner He's brilliant, but this isn't exactly light reading. But there are enough insights into his ideas on writing to make it worthwhile.

"Existentialism and Human Emotions" by jean-Paul Sartre Not nearly as much fun as it sounds.

I started a collection of Thomas Wolfe short stories tonight.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 3, 2007 - 11:55 AM   
 By:   Greg Bryant   (Member)

Just finished slick airplane thriller "Headwind" by John J. Nance.

Now reading "The United States Since 1980" by Dean Baker. Examines the economic and political shift to the right in the United States since the election of Reagan in 1980.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 3, 2007 - 5:11 PM   
 By:   Thread Assasin   (Member)

"The Rains Came" by Louis Bromfield.

 
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