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 Posted:   Jun 2, 2013 - 5:48 PM   
 By:   jenkwombat   (Member)

I have no problem with anyone hating "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom" (or any other film for that matter). It's only when they try to get *me* to hate it by throwing lame reasons at me that "'Raiders' is realistic but 'Temple' is not" or other such logically inconsistent nonsense --- like the people I wasted my time arguing with when I was younger. I should have just realized they simply didn't like the film and were trying to make sure everyone else didn't enjoy it (as some people, for reasons I'll never understand, tend to do) and ignored them.

BTW, I found Marion almost as obnoxious as Willy. *Almost*. (At least Willy was *supposed* to be obnoxious, as is evident by Indy's and Short Round's reactions to her.) And I actually liked Indiana having a young sidekick in Short Round. It was nice to see the altruistic side of Indy as well...

 
 Posted:   Jun 2, 2013 - 5:56 PM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

In horror movies with families, it's very often the case that mom knows or suspects what's going on, and dad is an incredulous boor who gaslights her and insists on being rational and sane even in the face of mounting evidence that he's completely wrong. It's a tired and lazy character dynamic and I would be very happy never to see it play out again.

 
 Posted:   Jun 2, 2013 - 7:22 PM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

...when a working dad is always portrayed as a heartless cad when he doesn't have time to play catch with his kids or make it to their fifth-grade school play on time, despite the fact that the reason he isn't there is because he's keeping food on the table and a roof over his family's heads by working his ASS off at some soul-sucking cubicle job. mad And it's ALWAYS the dad portrayed like this...just once I'd like to see a working MOM portrayed as the bad guy.

 
 Posted:   Jun 2, 2013 - 7:50 PM   
 By:   SBD   (Member)

- WHEN THE FINALE MOMENTS OF THE FILM TAKE AWAY FROM THE "TONE" or "MOOD"

-Am I the ONLY one who lost his shit and started laughing when Clint Eastwood started singing the closing credits song in GRAN TORINO?

Or in SUPER 8 when the climatic moment turns quiet and rather beautiful fades to black and rather then letting that sit for a few seconds of darkness we have it ruined by a smash cut of credits and the ELO song from prior starts to blare.


Or that goofy-ass country-western song that starts up on the final shot of KINGDOM OF THE SPIDERS.

I'll take 'Quality Control Fail' for $1000, Alex.

 
 Posted:   Jun 3, 2013 - 12:41 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

How about the trope of telling us early on that one of the characters has a fatal disease. Peak?

Also......]Gran Torino.


I thought GRAN TORINO played it off well .....

I enjoyed the reveal how the neighborhood stood up for Walt and didn't let his sacrifice go in vain.

Not saying your wrong ......


He is wrong. Totally
GT is a great film with a highly original script.
check it ooot!
bruce

 
 Posted:   Jun 3, 2013 - 12:43 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

In thrillers, the main character is shown to have a c at or dog in the beginning meaining that animal will be killed by the psycho later in the film.

even the otherwise excellent STRAW DOGS used this trope
bruce

 
 Posted:   Jun 3, 2013 - 12:45 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)



- WHEN THE FINALE MOMENTS OF THE FILM TAKE AWAY FROM THE "TONE" or "MOOD"

-Am I the ONLY one who lost his shit and started laughing when Clint Eastwood started singing the closing credits song in GRAN TORINO?

.


yes, you were the only one!
you sure have a bug up yer ass about this flic, BJ.

tell us, what's the problem - are you o.k.?wink
bruce

 
 Posted:   Jun 3, 2013 - 12:47 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

I have no problem with anyone hating "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom" (or any other film for that matter). It's only when they try to get *me* to hate it by throwing lame reasons at me that "'Raiders' is realistic but 'Temple' is not" or other such logically inconsistent nonsense --- like the people I wasted my time arguing with when I was younger. I should have just realized they simply didn't like the film and were trying to make sure everyone else didn't enjoy it (as some people, for reasons I'll never understand, tend to do) and ignored them.



yep.
same thing with SKYFALL critics
brm

 
 Posted:   Jun 3, 2013 - 12:48 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

In horror movies with families, it's very often the case that mom knows or suspects what's going on, and dad is an incredulous boor who gaslights her and insists on being rational and sane even in the face of mounting evidence that he's completely wrong. It's a tired and lazy character dynamic and I would be very happy never to see it play out again.

X-FILES did a nice reverse on this cliche!!!!
brm

 
 Posted:   Jun 4, 2013 - 11:45 AM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

The police knock on the door of a suspect.
He runs out the back door as the cops give chase.

The cop steps outside, looks right, looks left and goes back into the house.

I mean the suspect couldn;t have gotten far yet they ALWAYS give up immediately!!!!

lotsa variations on this trope
brm

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 5, 2013 - 7:35 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

In nearly every karate film from Hong Kong in the 70's you have scenes where the hero is taking on 6 or 7 heavies and he is beating the crap out of them and if you concentrate on the other guys who he is not fighting him that second they are standing there like idiots, when in fact they could take down the one guy in 30 seconds.

 
 Posted:   Jun 7, 2013 - 9:12 AM   
 By:   Altamese   (Member)

I don't remember seeing this in movies but in a lot of TV shows... the good guy and the bad guy, standing within touching distance, draw their guns and point them in each other's faces and then spend 5 minutes yelling at each other before holstering weapons. In real life the bad guy at least would shoot immediately.

 
 Posted:   Jun 7, 2013 - 9:12 AM   
 By:   Altamese   (Member)

I don't remember seeing this in movies but in a lot of TV shows... the good guy and the bad guy, standing within touching distance, draw their guns and point them in each other's faces and then spend 5 minutes yelling at each other before holstering weapons. In real life the bad guy at least would shoot immediately.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 7, 2013 - 5:24 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

How true, sadly in life those incidents are over and done with in a few seconds, unless it is one of those hostage incidents.

 
 Posted:   Jun 7, 2013 - 5:32 PM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

Establishing that two characters are siblings by having them address each other as "brother" or "sister" constantly. Some examples:

"Leave it to my big brother here to tell me what's right."

"Hey sis!"

"And just what did you expect, dear brother of mine?"

Etc, etc.

I have two sisters and one brother myself. I tend to address them .... by their actual names!

 
 Posted:   Jun 8, 2013 - 1:50 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

Establishing that two characters are siblings by having them address each other as "brother" or "sister" constantly.

"


well, to be fair....
sometimes the audience NEEDS that info (but we don't need it 'CONSTANTLY" - you are right about dat!)
brm

 
 Posted:   Jun 8, 2013 - 2:58 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Every crime show on television nowadays where the main suspect is not actually the perpetrator. They spend 40 minutes of the program on "one" suspect then at the very end, "Surprise!" it was actually someone else! Worse yet the writers set up two or more "false" suspects, just so they can show you what clever writers they are. (said sarcastically) Bring back the good old days of Columbo!

 
 Posted:   Jun 8, 2013 - 7:34 PM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

Every crime show on television nowadays where the main suspect is not actually the perpetrator. They spend 40 minutes of the program on "one" suspect then at the very end, "Surprise!" it was actually someone else! Worse yet the writers set up two or more "false" suspects, just so they can show you what clever writers they are. (said sarcastically) Bring back the good old days of Columbo!

Any dedicated fan of whodunnits will know that it's never the person with the greatest amount of evidence against them...it'll always turn out to be the person who is most helpful to the person investigating the case.

 
 Posted:   Jun 8, 2013 - 8:47 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Every crime show on television nowadays where the main suspect is not actually the perpetrator. They spend 40 minutes of the program on "one" suspect then at the very end, "Surprise!" it was actually someone else! Worse yet the writers set up two or more "false" suspects, just so they can show you what clever writers they are. (said sarcastically) Bring back the good old days of Columbo!

Any dedicated fan of whodunnits will know that it's never the person with the greatest amount of evidence against them...it'll always turn out to be the person who is most helpful to the person investigating the case.


That's fine but there's hardly ever a reasonable connection that the viewer can pick up on. No clues along the way which would make it interesting. The twist is usually out of the blue and at the eleventh hour. It's a waste for the script to spend 40 minutes (out of a 50 minute program) on the initial suspect, just to have a twist at the end no one could ever see coming.

 
 Posted:   Jun 8, 2013 - 10:46 PM   
 By:   Michaelware   (Member)

Yeah Batman in those new super self-serious realism nolan movies never has to use the toilet and get out of his rubber suit.

 
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