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 Posted:   Apr 17, 2014 - 6:20 AM   
 By:   paulhickling   (Member)

The burning question is should Clint's songs, 'Rowdy' and 'Cowboy Wedding' be included as extra tracks, along with the single release version of Frankie Laine's rendition of the theme, on any future TV Soundtrack release?

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 17, 2014 - 6:23 PM   
 By:   Richard-W   (Member)

The answer is of course they should be included.

Enjoying the thread, "(Member)". Keep it going.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 18, 2014 - 2:36 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Disc #2

Episode #20: The Violent Land
written by Buckley Angell
directed by Harmon Jones
guest: Davey Davidson, IMF Michael Forest, Gregg Palmer, Jacque Shelton, IMF Lew Brown, IMF Paul Sorensen

Gil Favor is anxious and waiting for the return of scout Pete Nolan who used to face the Mescaleros tribe. Two bounty hunters joins in the crew of Favor to get back of a little girl abducted by the tribe. Rowdy Yates is sour and advises Favor to avoid the Indian territory. Later, in front of his late sister’s grave, Yates engages in private prayer and also meets an Indian chief asking to pay for the cows they hunt. An incident happens between the chief and the two bounty hunters when Yates saves him and receives an arrow in the shoulder from an Indian warrior. Yates is healed at the Indian camp and meets the ‘wanted’ abducted American girl: then the trouble starts…

It tackles the theme of American kids abducted by Indians like in John Ford’s The Searchers and also the theme of lost identity. It’s the second young people episode after Blood Harvest. Produced by Endre Bohem and it highlights the character of Rowdy Yates, meaning actor Clint Eastwood shines and it shows an Indian friendship a la The Outaw Josey Wales. Actor Michael Forest plays the Indian chief as Barry Atwtater previously.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 18, 2014 - 2:39 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

The answer is of course they should be included.

Enjoying the thread, "(Member)". Keep it going.




Thanks and don't forget:
"Head them up! Move them Out!"

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 18, 2014 - 2:43 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Actor Eric Fleming is quiet good, by the way. I appreciate his persona more and more.
Fleming and Eastwood are very different in terms of archetypes, cowboy archetypes.
One is a traditional extravert loud mouth and the other a cold mumbler.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 18, 2014 - 4:47 AM   
 By:   Simon Morris   (Member)

I'm enjoying reading this thread although I have to say I have no interest whatsoever in the series. I think it used to get shown when I was a kid. I did see an episode a while back, although I can't imagine where I actually saw it.

The score made no impression on me at all, I'm sorry to say.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 18, 2014 - 4:56 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

One of the delight of the series is watching actor Clint Eastwood as a clean-cut young actor doing his trade in the business. There's a generation gap between Clint and the cast. He is the youngster amongst old men.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 18, 2014 - 5:12 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Composer Rudy Schrager has got a huge amount of onscreen credits but ultimately it was only stock music from his early season 7 scores ("A Man Called Mushy", "Canliss", "Damon's Road"). Those onscreen credits only pointed out his music represented at least 50% of the recycled material for that episode.


Those season 7 scores are atmospheric, un-intrusive and low-key and set the direction of the drama and the characters.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 18, 2014 - 11:48 PM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Episode #21: The Winter Soldier
written by John Dunkel
directed by Justus Addiss
AD IMF John W. Rogers
music by IMF Gerald Fried
guest: Robert Blake, IMF Brooke Bundy, Jim Boles, Liam Sullivan

Private Hap Johnson is a parasite who decides to quit the army. He first trades his uniform and weapons to storekeeper Watson to civilian clothes in order to join the crew of Gil Favor by fooling Wishbone about his background. Unable to get hired by Favor, he lets army traces to the camp and rejoin the wagon of the Kurtz family. Meanwhile the army tracks him down from the storekeeper to the crew of Favor: both men get into trouble because the army find out US army equipment. Favor is to be judged for making a so-called transaction with Johnson.

Produced by Endre Bohem and it's the best so far because of the trio of actors: Clint Eastwood, Robert Blake and Brooke Bundy. It’s the third blue soldiers story but focusing on a deserter case and it’s the second episode, after "Texas Fever", in which a member of the trail is arrested by the authorities and must undergo a trial. Find an Indian danger backdrop too. The performance of guest actor Robert Blake as a rolling stone makes this soldier tale engrossing. Actress Brooke Bundy is cute as a button and will return in both Mission: Impossible and Mannix. Composer Gerald Fried’s music is stock music from “Moment in the Sun”. Assistant director John W. Rogers will work on The Wild Wild West and Mission: Impossible (as AD and associate producer) and on the pilot of Mannix.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 19, 2014 - 5:10 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

"HEAD THEM UP! MOVE THEM OUT!"
—Gil Favor to his crew.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 20, 2014 - 12:54 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Episode #22: Prairie Fire
teleplay by Elliott Arnold and Lou Vittes
story by Elliott Arnold
directed by Jesse Hibbs
edited by Paul Krasny
music by IMF Rudy Schrager
guest: IMF Michael Conrad, IMF Anthony Caruso, IMF Vic Perrin, Hal Baylor, John Hart, Jacque Shelton (again), John Boyer

A prairie is on fire and Gil Favor must pass through. Meanwhile, three cattle men and cook Wishbone attend the funeral of their friend Tod Murdoch. The three cattle men decide to steal a herd of beeves from Tod Murdoch and threatens Wishbone to give them the ownership paper for the selling. Wishbone is tortured and forces to write a phony letter to Favor. Jerry Munson, one of the three devious cattle men, has a bad conscious about Wishbone’s treatment.

Produced by Endre Bohem. It’s a cook wishbone episode featuring three cruel thieves. Despite the credits of Rudy Schrager, it is stock music. Actor Vic Perrin is known as the control voice from The Outer Limits and specializes in voice-overs and dubbings in many series, especially on Mission: Impossible.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 21, 2014 - 1:41 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Episode #23: Retreat
written by John Dunkel
directed by James Goldstone
AD IMF Lee H. Katzin
edited by IMF Paul Krasny
music by IMF Rudy Schrager
guest: John Anderson, IMF Steve Ihnat, Ford Rainey, John Lasell, Keith McConnell, Jacque Shelton (again), Jan Arvan

Anxious to retire from the service, demoted and bitter old Major Cantwell receives a money delivery of $32,500 from Colonel Hart when Gil Favor comes to the fort to sell some beeves and notices punished orderly Kaster who used to abuse of the Major's facilities. Free from his bonds and fired from the army, Kaster begs to join Favor's crew. Major Cantwell asks Favor to deliver a private package for him. The replacement of the Major arrives early on the job and informs him that he gets back his Colonel position with a promotion of Brigadier General. Major Cantwell is eager to get his package back because it contains the money of the fort that he has planned to keep for his pension.

It's the return of the producer duo (Kowalski and Geller) and a rise of quality. It's another blue soldier story after "Corporal Dasovik" and "The Winter Soldier" (also written by John Dunkel) and the second military fort entry after "A Time for Waiting" combined with the theme of oldness: see "Josh". Note the excellent performance of Steve Ihnat as the cunning thief Kaster and, above all, John Anderson as desperate old officer Cantwell. It's very good on the whole, very John Ford-esque in the tone and the added value is James Goldstone's film-making. As in all blue soldiers produced by Geller/Kowalski, eventually, death is the ultimate conclusion.

This is my favorite blue soldier story.






Footnotes [recently added]
IMF means Impossible Mission Force (aka the crew of Mission: Impossible) and "not" International Monetary Fund.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 21, 2014 - 3:58 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Note the excellent performance of Steve Ihnat as the cunning thief Kaster!

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 21, 2014 - 4:38 AM   
 By:   paulhickling   (Member)

One of the delight of the series is watching actor Clint Eastwood as a clean-cut young actor doing his trade in the business. There's a generation gap between Clint and the cast. He is the youngster amongst old men.

Member, it's always intrigued me what Eastwood is like in the last season, where he's now the lead, and he's done Fistful of Dollars. I'm fairly interested in getting that season when it's out on dvd. I'm sure there must've been some change in him and I wonder if it's apparent watching the series.

Does he direct in that last season? Or write perhaps? He must've been doing something else on set. He always said he took an interest in the rest of production.

While most western series were broadcast in the UK, Rawhide was one of those that had finished by the time I was around (born in '61). I took an interest when I was becoming a fan of his movies in the late 70s, but the only thing I've seen is a single episode during a ITV retrospective season in the late 70s/ early 80s.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 21, 2014 - 6:00 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

One of the delight of the series is watching actor Clint Eastwood as a clean-cut young actor doing his trade in the business. There's a generation gap between Clint and the cast. He is the youngster amongst old men.

Member, it's always intrigued me what Eastwood is like in the last season, where he's now the lead, and he's done Fistful of Dollars. I'm fairly interested in getting that season when it's out on dvd. I'm sure there must've been some change in him and I wonder if it's apparent watching the series.

Does he direct in that last season? Or write perhaps? He must've been doing something else on set. He always said he took an interest in the rest of production.

While most western series were broadcast in the UK, Rawhide was one of those that had finished by the time I was around (born in '61). I took an interest when I was becoming a fan of his movies in the late 70s, but the only thing I've seen is a single episode during a ITV retrospective season in the late 70s/ early 80s.





The final season will be released in June 3, 2014. I will get it.
There's a drawback to that season 8: the writing.
Eastwood never directed a single episode.
But he may have contributed "unofficially" as a consultant of some kind or helping shooting one specific scene.


FYI, A Fistfull of Dollars was released in Italy on September 12, 1964.
The seventh season of Rawhide started to be broadcast on September 25, 1964.
It meant that Eastwood had to work with Sergio Leone and Geller and Kowalski the same year.
The filming of A Fistfull of Dollars started in April 1964.
A Fistfull of Dollars was the 'vicious' flip side of Rawhide.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 21, 2014 - 7:10 AM   
 By:   paulhickling   (Member)

Thanks Member. Happy to stand corrected on the finer points.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 22, 2014 - 12:39 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Disc #3

Episode #24: The Empty Sleeve
teleplay by Lou Vittes
story by Endre Bohem
directed by Justus Addiss
AD IMF John W. Rogers
guest: Everett Sloane, Burt Douglas, Dick Davalos, IMF John Pickard (again), David Manley, Don Kennedy, Nancy Rennick

Gil Favor faces a vital issue about his herd of 30,000 beeves: they refuse to drink the water of the river and are on the brink of dying. Favor orders Yates to go see a vet about it. Meanwhile, former bank robber and blue soldier, now one-arm man, Tom Cowan asks Favor for a job that he gives after witnessing his abilities. Yates returns and informs his boss the beeves need salt. But Favor is facing another issue: where does he get a huge quantity of salt? Cowan finds the solution: the town of Murtree, where he used to rob the bank of Mr. Sam Butler and fails to marry a woman that he left at the last minute.

Produced by Endre Bohem. Despite the domestic start, it's a serious torn-inside character's study centered around the case of Tom Cowan and his troubled past. Actor Everett Sloane is excellent at playing the ruthless blackmailer banker making a devious deal with Tom Cowan.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 22, 2014 - 5:36 AM   
 By:   CindyLover   (Member)

While most western series were broadcast in the UK, Rawhide was one of those that had finished by the time I was around (born in '61). I took an interest when I was becoming a fan of his movies in the late 70s, but the only thing I've seen is a single episode during a ITV retrospective season in the late 70s/ early 80s.

Didn't you see any episodes when Channel 4 ran it in the '90s?

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 22, 2014 - 8:44 AM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

I suppose it was the popularity of this series that dictated a change of title for the 1951 movie RAWHIDE when it was first telecast on Saturday Night at the Movies c. 1961-62. For television it became DESPERATE SIEGE. Actually that's a better title. The picture, scored by Sol Kaplan, had Tyrone Power and Susan Hayward being held hostage by outlaws at an isolated relay station. It had nothing to do with the teleseries.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 22, 2014 - 10:15 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

I suppose it was the popularity of this series that dictated a change of title for the 1951 movie RAWHIDE when it was first telecast on Saturday Night at the Movies c. 1961-62. For television it became DESPERATE SIEGE. Actually that's a better title. The picture, scored by Sol Kaplan, had Tyrone Power and Susan Hayward being held hostage by outlaws at an isolated relay station. It had nothing to do with the teleseries.


I used to watch that feature film too. It has impressive scenes depicting a night flood of cows
and the character of Power rushes to reach the branches of a tree.
Sympathetic 'modest' film.

 
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