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 Posted:   Feb 10, 2013 - 5:06 PM   
 By:   Mr Greg   (Member)

Yes, I knew of the "Oxnard Tapes" project (though didn't realise it was that imminent, and with that title). Seems a shame if that is the real reason for distancing it from its big brother.

 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2013 - 5:18 PM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

There are two ways I'd like to see Paranormal Activity franchise potentially concluded after the disappointed 3rd and 4th installments. First idea: finish the damned thing. Two more films. The first, another one set in the past with the sisters' teenage haunting; the second, end the story. Somehow. I think we've all seen more than enough of Katie Featherston shambling around affectlessly. I think we've seen enough of the same premise over and over. So pull out all the stop and give us a grand guignol finale. Second idea: go meta. Take the series from found footage to documentary: have a filmmaker take footage from all the films to date and construct a real documentary around it, asking the questions that the characters are too stupid to ask themselves, (among others, like what are the chances that a Toby would end up in a family that likes to film itself generation after generation?!), giving it an air of professionalism and building to some sort of tragic coda to the whole affair.

 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2013 - 5:33 PM   
 By:   Buscemi   (Member)

On the second idea: Blair Witch 2 and The Last Exorcism tried similar premises (the former about the making of a documentary, the latter being a mockumentary) and neither one worked.

My idea for a Paranormal Activity sequel: have the entire neighborhood become haunted and tell it from the point of view of the ghosts. Of course, this idea would require dropping the found footage style and having a much bigger budget than the other films.

 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2013 - 5:35 PM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

On the second idea: Blair Witch 2 and The Last Exorcism tried similar premises (the former about the making of a documentary, the latter being a mockumentary) and neither one worked.

On the other hand, Lake Mungo, another mockumentary, was truly excellent, one of the best genre films of the decade.

Anyway, one thing that would set a PA mockumentary apart would be if a talented filmmaker actually "found" all the found footage we've been privy to and assembled excerpts from that existing footage (along with interviews with surviving characters from the films, etc) into a viable documentary that actually got us to see the subject matter in a new light. It'll never happen but I have fun thinking about how it could work.

 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2013 - 5:51 PM   
 By:   Mr Greg   (Member)

Yeah - I'd pay good money to see any of those ideas..Part V has to be different....4 kept its audience, but the audience was quite disgruntled afterwards...a Part V that is "More of the Same" will alenate them too much and killl the franchise off for good, I feel...


On the other hand, Lake Mungo, another mockumentary, was truly excellent, one of the best genre films of the decade.

By the way - not heard of this one - thanks for pointing it out to me....another one to hunt out!

 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2013 - 6:33 PM   
 By:   Buscemi   (Member)

There are two versions of Lake Mungo: the Australian version and the American version. The American version is longer but has pacing issues while the Australian version is shorter and the director's cut.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2013 - 8:51 PM   
 By:   John McMasters   (Member)

I find that found footage movies almost always psychologically and emotionally distance me from the stories being told – like reading one of John Barth’s short tales in which he uses “ ” marks in multiple repeats to make everything a quote of a quote of a quote ad infinitum. They seem weirdly less immediate to me – deliberately skewed with an artifice of digression and multiplicity. An effort to lure a viewing into feeling that formal technique has been relegated to the background in favor of raw emotions – but these films, of course, rely on technique and a rigorous style much more that Hitchcock ever did. That said, I like many of them – starting with some films from many years ago like “The Anderson Tapes” which is certainly a bit within a genre. “Man Bites Dog” is also good. “The Blair Witch Project” simply didn’t scare me – and I did see it in a theater. “Cloverfield” played for me like a snuff film – let’s watch the monster kill everyone. Meh. The advertising campaign was a certifiable hoot, though. I’ve yet to see any of the “Paranormal” films – or “Troll” which is, I see, available via Netflix streaming.

V/H/S was a gigantic bore to me – it was just a carbon copy of a carbon copy put through a grinder of the old Amicus anthology films like “Asylum” “Dr. Terror’s House of Horrors” “Torture Garden” “The House That Dripped Blood” etc. It was kind of fun seeing what the New Kids In Town group of directors did with all of those old stories – but the film was, by design, fairly unwatchable – in keeping with the spirit of the film I kept fast forwarding through the deadly dull bits (of which there were many to pad the film out to 2 freaking hours) to get to the scares and gore. None of the tales in V/H/S ended up having any surprises for me – a few minutes into each and the outcomes seemed extraordinarily obvious. I did enjoy some of the gore – but the splatter, for me at least, also fell victim to the distancing technique of the degraded video style and didn’t have much of a punch. The wraparound tale also just seemed a desperate ploy – a film-school lurch toward coherence – that the film didn’t need. It added nothing interesting or scary – but again these are all just my own personal opinions.

 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2013 - 9:19 PM   
 By:   Buscemi   (Member)

John, you'll be sad to find out that a sequel to V/H/S (titled S-VHS) is now in post-production and set to open later this year.

I still have never seen the film but I do know that one of the visual effects supervisors (I believe he also worked on You're Next, which opens in August after two years on the shelf) introduced a screening here during the one week the film played.

 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2013 - 10:10 PM   
 By:   Mr Greg   (Member)

It's really no more fake than any other way of telling a story....I know what you mean, but to me it's no less distracting, or removed, than - for example - the suggestion of cameras capturing Moses receiving the Ten Commandments, or a point-of-view shot of a shark swimming...it's not the technique, it's how it done....well, for me anyway. There are plenty of bad examples, just as there are with any genre, but I think there are good ones too...

Of course, like any other kind of film, it will always have its fans and will always have its detractors, and rightly so.

I didn't know about S-VHS - bring it on!

 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2013 - 10:18 AM   
 By:   Mr Greg   (Member)

Grave Encounters 2...Ummmmm...Upcoming filmmaker wants his big break, so sets out to figure out and prove whether the original "Grave Encounters" is real or not...some shocks, some scares, some effective moments...and some imagination in amongst the inevitable well-worn cliches...but did they really have to make the cast so annoying?? In the end I just stopped caring who bit the dust and who didn't...I mean seriously...they are SO grating!! The only saving grace is a character who returns from the original...but even then he/she is pushing it...

 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2013 - 11:15 AM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

I thought the first Grave Encounters was pretty disappointing. They treated the really unsettling stuff as window dressing, and pushed the boring jump scares and such to the forefield, and the final ending bit was awful.

 
 Posted:   Feb 14, 2013 - 8:18 AM   
 By:   Mr Greg   (Member)

Paranormal Entity 4: The Awakening a.k.a. 100 Ghost Street: The Return of Richard Speck a.k.a. Paranormal Entity 4: The Return of Richard Speck...TV Crew try to contact the ghost of Richard Speck, with predictable results. The Asylum tried something different (for them) - carried the ghost stuff on (but with far less hanging around and very little tension involved) but added splatter, some gory moments and a hunt through a dead person's trouser pockets that you really wouldn't catch me trying. They also added some (note - some) pacing. It's no Oscar winner but you don't go and see an Asylum film expecting a masterclass. As said Asylum films go though, it's entertaining stuff with some uncomfortable moments. Best of the sequels (though admittedly that's not difficult...2 and 3 were...well...yeah...).

 
 Posted:   Feb 16, 2013 - 8:17 PM   
 By:   Mr Greg   (Member)

The Bay...wasn't quite sure what to expect from this...young inexperienced news reporter is in Chesapeake Bay to film July 4th festivities...meanwhile, local Mayor has refused to create a fuss over concerns that the local water has become contaminated. The contaminations spreads, and us humans become a breeding ground for some nasties. Wonderful to see Levinson's name again...and there is a maturity to the filmmaking (not to mention permitting the audience to be mature too) - and steady, but not slow, pace that belies the somewhat cheesy and sometimes unoriginal stuff on display. This is not a set of vignettes with a half-assed conclusion - there is a real feeling of dread, of watching something desperate unfolding, and it's a real pleasure to watch.

 
 Posted:   Feb 16, 2013 - 8:27 PM   
 By:   Buscemi   (Member)

I remember reading about The Bay but Lionsgate basically left it for dead (despite having an Oscar winning director at the helm) to promote the final Twilight movie.

Of course, this is also the same studio that paid $6 million for You're Next and shelved it for two years due to a single bad test screening (despite the fact that it was adored at Toronto).

 
 Posted:   Feb 16, 2013 - 9:19 PM   
 By:   Mr Greg   (Member)

Sucks...

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 17, 2013 - 11:49 AM   
 By:   LRobHubbard   (Member)

The Bay...wasn't quite sure what to expect from this...young inexperienced news reporter is in Chesapeake Bay to film July 4th festivities...meanwhile, local Mayor has refused to create a fuss over concerns that the local water has become contaminated. The contaminations spreads, and us humans become a breeding ground for some nasties. Wonderful to see Levinson's name again...and there is a maturity to the filmmaking (not to mention permitting the audience to be mature too) - and steady, but not slow, pace that belies the somewhat cheesy and sometimes unoriginal stuff on display. This is not a set of vignettes with a half-assed conclusion - there is a real feeling of dread, of watching something desperate unfolding, and it's a real pleasure to watch.

Ditto about THE BAY - too bad it comes right after a spate of shitty found-footage horror films.

V/H/S was perhaps the worst piece of shit to be marketed as a horror film - not looking forward to S VHS for more morons (and made by the same people who did YOU'RE NEXT, which I suspect is similarly overhyped.)

 
 Posted:   Feb 17, 2013 - 4:18 PM   
 By:   Buscemi   (Member)

No horror film could ever take the title of "most overhyped" from Automation Transfusion. Horror websites loved the film but when it came out, it proved to be a pointless excuse to be as gory as possible that no audience liked. The film also single-handedly made most viewers stop trusting horror websites on recommendations.

 
 Posted:   Feb 17, 2013 - 5:15 PM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

No horror film could ever take the title of "most overhyped" from Automation Transfusion. Horror websites loved the film but when it came out, it proved to be a pointless excuse to be as gory as possible that no audience liked. The film also single-handedly made most viewers stop trusting horror websites on recommendations.

Who are these "most viewers"? I try to keep up with new horror movies and I've never even heard of Automation Transfusion!

 
 Posted:   Feb 17, 2013 - 5:25 PM   
 By:   Buscemi   (Member)

Horror fans who rented the film. When the film first played at festivals, horror websites hyped it as the future of horror and Dimension picked it up to introduce the Dimension Extreme line. So when it came to DVD, people were expecting a good movie due to all of the critical blurbs on the box. But instead, they saw a cheap, amateurish imitation of better horror films.

You could be forgiven if you haven't heard of it since it never played theatres (Dimension did the same thing to the much better received Inside and Martyrs) but the fact that the film's critical praise was a major black mark on horror sites cannot be denied.

 
 Posted:   Feb 17, 2013 - 5:31 PM   
 By:   Mr Greg   (Member)

New one on me, too...another one to line up!!

 
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