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 Posted:   Jul 2, 2013 - 4:36 PM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

If anyone attends both the 70mm and DCP showings of LAWRENCE, please report here with a comparison of the similarities/differences of the presentations. Thanks! smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 8, 2013 - 1:11 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

I saw the AFI's 70mm presentation of GETTYSBURG yesterday. They had listed the film as being the 271-minute version, which is commonly referred to as the "director's cut" (although the AFI did not use that term). It seemed unlikely to me that that version would exist in a 70mm print, and indeed, the version actually screened was the original 248-minute theatrical cut (with intermission). Picture quality was fine, for a blow-up. The 6-track sound was quite impressive, with good use of the surrounds.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 23, 2013 - 6:25 PM   
 By:   ClipperJon   (Member)

I saw "Star!" at AFI Silver. It was glorious to see 175 minutes of Julie Andrews as Gertrude Lawrence in 70mm with 6-track stereo sound. The print was excellent, though there were a couple of reels which seemed a little faded compared to most other reels. There were a few awkward reel changes. Other than that, the film itself played considerably better on the big screen than it does on home video.

I checked AFI's website for this weekend's "The Sound of Music" Saturday and Sunday screenings. The film is now advertised as in 35mm and not, as previously announced, in DCP. I wonder what happened.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 23, 2013 - 9:58 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

I saw "Star!" at AFI Silver. It was glorious to see 175 minutes of Julie Andrews as Gertrude Lawrence in 70mm with 6-track stereo sound. The print was excellent, though there were a couple of reels which seemed a little faded compared to most other reels. There were a few awkward reel changes. Other than that, the film itself played considerably better on the big screen than it does on home video.

I checked AFI's website for this weekend's "The Sound of Music" Saturday and Sunday screenings. The film is now advertised as in 35mm and not, as previously announced, in DCP. I wonder what happened.



Thanks for mentioning the change for THE SOUND OF MUSIC. I'm going to have to rethink going to see that this weekend.

As for STAR!, I also saw that showing. Afterwards, I went back and read some of the reviews that were written after the film's premiere, and was surprised to find that many of them were mixed,
not primarily negative as I was expecting. My feelings on the film were mixed as well. I was trying to figure out why the film failed with the public. I'm going to try writing something on that next week.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2013 - 1:09 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

I checked AFI's website for this weekend's "The Sound of Music" Saturday and Sunday screenings. The film is now advertised as in 35mm and not, as previously announced, in DCP. I wonder what happened.


According to the AFI, there has been a delay in the installation of their DCP equipment. I hope it gets resolved before the scheduled August DCP showings of HELLO, DOLLY! and CLEOPATRA.

AFI has also announced the cancellation of all showings of THE FLIGHT OF THE PHOENIX. Since I had planned on watching that film the same day as THE SOUND OF MUSIC, that cancellation makes it easier to decide not to attend the downgraded SoM presentation.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 27, 2013 - 6:28 PM   
 By:   ClipperJon   (Member)

I was disappointed with "The Sound of Music" 35mm print which was shown today at AFI Silver Theater. It had far too many distracting vertical lines. The sound was good, but that was the only positive attribute. I would pass on tomorrow night's screening.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 11, 2013 - 3:10 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Yesterday, the AFI Silver Theatre ran HELLO, DOLLY! on its new digital cinema package system. Some attendees were disappointed that the film was shown in the AFI's middle-sized modern stadium theater rather than on the larger screen in the historic theater. A few got a refund after finding this out. But I was interested in checking out how the film would look in DCP.

It looked pretty good. There were a few scenes where there seemed to be a thin layer of whitish haze over the image, particularly on the brighter portions of the screen, including faces. Many other scenes however looked clear and bright. I don't remember seeing that particular anomaly on the 70mm print that I saw last year at the AFI. But one review of the recent DVD notes that "There's some clear soft-focus-flattery going on in most closeups," so maybe that's what I was seeing.

The AFI botched the showing somewhat by blowing right through the intermission, and starting the Entr'Acte as soon as the Intermission card faded from the screen. I suspect that we'll never be seeing the film in 70mmm again at the AFI, or perhaps not even in DCP on the AFI's largest screen, since, for the moment at least, they only seem to have the single DCP system.

Next week, the AFI will be showing CLEOPATRA in DCP. I'll try to take in that showing as well.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 18, 2013 - 12:15 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Yesterday I saw the DCP (digital cinema package) showing of CLEOPATRA at the AFI Silver Theatre. To my eyes, the film looked fantastic, with deep bright colors, sharp focus, and not a mark on it. The film didn't have any hazy shots like the few I saw in HELLO, DOLLY! last week. I've previously only seen CLEOPATRA in 35mm, but based upon other films that I've seen in 70mm at the AFI, I don't see how a 70mm print of CLEOPATRA could have improved upon the digital picture that I saw. If you get a chance to see this version of the film, by all means do it.

The AFI has a Texas Instruments DLP projection system projecting onto a screen that is 37 ft. by 19 ft. (41.6 ft. on the diagonal). This week, the AFI respected the film's Intermission, by actually having one, instead of blowing right past it like they did with HELLO, DOLLY! last week.

 
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