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 Posted:   Mar 23, 2011 - 5:38 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I have the edition that ends at Manhattan Murder Mystery, but the latest version goes up to around 2004.

http://tinyurl.com/6eh5zdj

 
 Posted:   Mar 23, 2011 - 8:47 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

"I forbid. I forbid you to go. I'm forbidding! Is that what you do when I'm forbidding?"


What makes Manhattan Murder Mystery different from most Woody Allen fare is the absence of philosophical ruminations that usually inhabit his films; a lightweight buoyancy dominates the proceedings here. MMM instead relies on the “earlier, funny” style of his movies with slapstick and lots of amusing one-liners, which are other Allen trademarks. However, like many other Allen films, MMM examines--albeit with much humor--the state of marriage and how it needs an exciting jolt once in a while. That’s about as far as Allen goes with his examination of relationships in MMM, but other Allen films from that time period chronicle the state of a marriage in considerably serious detail, like 1992’s Husband & Wives. However, MMM is the message heavily-sugar coated, like one of Carol Lipton’s rich desserts.

 
 Posted:   Mar 24, 2011 - 2:12 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

It's interesting to note that Woody filmed ZELIG and A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy at the same time. He claims the latter film as another whim. He had written the script in two weeks and they filmed it while doing work on Zelig.

 
 Posted:   Mar 31, 2011 - 1:16 PM   
 By:   David Sones (Allardyce)   (Member)

Revisited Stardust Memories (1980) a few nights ago. One of his finest. I just love the look of it and all of the subliminal information flying around the screen (how 'bout those big photos on the wall of Woody's home that keep changing, eh?). And of course this movie is the origin of the "early funny ones" line we know so well. Really a fascinating exploration of stardom, mental illness, creepy fans, absurd notions of "celebrity", and more. Just a great movie.

(That's right. This thread is not going to die on my watch.)

 
 Posted:   Mar 31, 2011 - 3:47 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

http://www.slate.com/id/2289181/

I haven't read it yet, but here it is.

"I've Seen Every Woody Allen Movie
Here's what I've learned."

 
 Posted:   Mar 31, 2011 - 4:13 PM   
 By:   Anthony Marose   (Member)

Woody Allen; I'm glad to see some mature discussion over his work. You know--I'm very partial--unlike some others--to his recent engagement to London. There are some fine jewels in his European bag--Match Point, Scoop, Vicky Christina Barcelona. But one of my most precious favorites, in regard to his New York efforts, is Anything Else. I thought Jason Biggs' casting was awe-inspired, and his chemistry with Christina Ricci was electric; a sprite of on-screen squabbling that still makes me laugh. I also appreciated Stockard Channing's filthy cameo as Ricci's mother, an egocentric basket case whose intrusions were equally embraced by the laugh factory. It's a finely-crafted story with Allen's usual intelligence littered throughout his bumbling schticks. For the same reasons, I also recommend Whatever Works--another witty remark on oddball relationships.

 
 Posted:   Mar 31, 2011 - 6:06 PM   
 By:   David Sones (Allardyce)   (Member)

I missed Anything Else. I'll check it out.

 
 Posted:   Mar 31, 2011 - 8:58 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I'll admit that the casting of the Johansson girl has kept me away from many of Woody's recent efforts, though I'd probably find something to like in these, right? Or would I be aghast at the rehashing of earlier, superior films?

 
 Posted:   Mar 31, 2011 - 9:11 PM   
 By:   Bogey   (Member)

The Curse of the Jade Scorpion (2001)

 
 Posted:   Mar 31, 2011 - 11:02 PM   
 By:   David Sones (Allardyce)   (Member)

I'll admit that the casting of the Johansson girl has kept me away from many of Woody's recent efforts, though I'd probably find something to like in these, right? Or would I be aghast at the rehashing of earlier, superior films?

Me, I haven't cared for any of the films of his "second birth" that I've seen. It's like somebody else made 'em. Hated Match Point with a passion (and it revisits themes from the vastly superior Crimes & Misdemeanors), couldn't stand Cassandra's Dream, and Melinda & Melinda was excruciating. They just aren't...right. Jim, knowing what I know of your film tastes both Woody and non-Woody, I think you would probably feel the same way.

Small Time Crooks was the last Woody-Woody movie that I liked. Elaine May stole it!

 
 Posted:   Mar 31, 2011 - 11:04 PM   
 By:   David Sones (Allardyce)   (Member)

The Curse of the Jade Scorpion (2001)

I really enjoyed this one. It was cute, a nice throwback to films like The Purple Rose of Cairo, or screwball comedies of the '30s and '40s. Nicely shot, too.

 
 Posted:   Apr 2, 2011 - 5:00 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Here's that Woody Allen comic strip book I mentioned:



http://www.amazon.com/Dread-Superficiality-Woody-Allen-Comic/dp/0810957426/ref=sr_1_10?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1299000643&sr=1-10


Currently $7.77 at Amazon--hardcover. A must for comic strip and Woody fans!

 
 Posted:   Apr 24, 2011 - 5:01 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I'm dropping Alice from my top five and replacing it with Husbands and Wives. Great performances from all involved and I even like the handheld cam! The Woody-Juliette Lewis scenes are also quite good, but it's the Pollack-Davis storyline that has the lion's share of brilliant work. Love, love, LOVE this movie.

 
 Posted:   Apr 24, 2011 - 5:32 AM   
 By:   Storyteller   (Member)

The Curse of the Jade Scorpion (2001)

I really enjoyed this one. It was cute, a nice throwback to films like The Purple Rose of Cairo, or screwball comedies of the '30s and '40s. Nicely shot, too.



I completely agree. Critics tore this film apart when it was released, so it took a bit for me to see it. But when I finally did, I loved. It makes a great double feature with Bullets Over Broadway.

 
 Posted:   Apr 27, 2011 - 11:26 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I've finally warmed up to Mighty Aphrodite. I love the scene where Woody is told by Mira Sorvino that the mob guys are going to kill him. A frightened Woody says "Ddi..did he specify the caliber?" LOL! This was a movie made during the era of Michael Rapaport, who does a good job as the punch drunk fighter/aspiring onion farmer.

 
 Posted:   Apr 27, 2011 - 1:22 PM   
 By:   David Sones (Allardyce)   (Member)

I've finally warmed up to Mighty Aphrodite. I love the scene where Woody is told by Mira Sorvino that the mob guys are going to kill him. A frightened Woody says "Ddi..did he specify the caliber?" LOL! This was a movie made during the era of Michael Rapaport, who does a good job as the punch drunk fighter/aspiring onion farmer.

I haven't seen it since it premiered, but I enjoyed it. Time to revisit. I remember there was a hilarious scene where Woody was listing off porn titles or something that had me in stitches. I also enjoyed the music selections (bought the soundtrack immediately), and the hilarious When You're Smilin' finale by the greek chorus.

 
 Posted:   Nov 18, 2011 - 7:47 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Sun Nov 20 and Monday Nov 21, PBS' American Masters will air a 3 and a half hour Woody Allen documentary.

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/episodes/woody-allen/about-the-documentary-film/1865/

"Some bury, some burn...I ate!"

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 18, 2011 - 7:54 AM   
 By:   L BENDER   (Member)

EVERYONE SAYS I LOVE YOU.

 
 Posted:   Nov 18, 2011 - 7:57 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

"May the Force be with you, Donald"

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 18, 2011 - 10:24 AM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

I loved MIDNIGHT IN PARIS, the best film I've seen this year and, apparently, Allen's most financially successful film ever.

 
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