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 Posted:   Mar 12, 2008 - 4:35 PM   
 By:   MikeJ   (Member)

Breakpoint is a classic Season One episode.

I watched this episode AFTER having acquainted myself with Tony Shaloub on WINGS and other performances. He is damn scary in this episode but still no match for the refined gentleman machine of destruction known as Robert McCall.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 16, 2008 - 2:32 PM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)

still no match for the refined gentleman machine of destruction known as Robert McCall.



And that hasta be THE best all-around description we've ever heard, Mike. Edward might wonder if you're still channeling the spirit of Control.



Are ya? ... wink

 
 Posted:   Mar 17, 2008 - 12:09 AM   
 By:   MikeJ   (Member)

Lookit that...

The man is still a titan.

It was such a treat to see him turn up in HOT FUZZ last year.

 
 Posted:   Mar 17, 2008 - 12:57 AM   
 By:   Sarge   (Member)

I have fond memories of THE EQUALIZER, and really should revisit it in the near future.

However, Edward Woodward will always be burned into my mind as THIS character -



He's pompous, arrogant, and pious to the point of absurdity - yet we come to admire his sense of justice, his refusal to give up, and ultimately we feel tremendous pity for him.

It's a subtle job of acting that can easily go unnoticed, but Woodward gave that guy a soul. He could have EASILY been a one-dimensional stiff whose horrible fate was merely an interesting plot twist...

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 17, 2008 - 11:00 AM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)

We first were mighty surprised (and profoundly pleased) to discover his presence as The Ghost of Christmas Present



opposite



What was so thoroughly delightful is he brought such beguiling gravitas to the role (along with an unexpected impish humor that played marvelously against Scott’s curmudgeon – tho when Woodward let loose the power in his outraged voice, he did the damn impossible and made you forget Scott altogether: and of how many actors can you give that tribute?!)

We were also impressed by his disciplined performance in



as well as opposite



(an unlikely teaming of Bond and McCall, although the comparison isn’t at all apt given the film itself).

We’ve still to catch his lauded characterization



in



It’s no accident that the one thespian who never willingly relinquished or conceded his theatrical crown to anyone



did once proclaim Edward Woodward “the best actor in England”.



More than ‘nuff magnificently said! smile

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 17, 2008 - 11:19 AM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)

21. Unpunished Crimes.

Dan Hedaya



and John Cullum (his first in a trio of guest-star stints).



22. Pretenders.

Chad Redding as the beleagured apartment dweller next to a hired assassin (she became a regular in Season Two as Alice, McCall's detective liaison - and she was married to Executive Producer James McAdams).

Tony Musante as Parker, the hitman.



and Ron O'Neal as Detective Isadore,



the first in a series of appearances in the role.

plus the pivotal Robert Lansing



as Control.

Which wraps up



As that YouTube vignette proudly proclaims:



He IS the No. 1 Hard Guy ... wink

 
 Posted:   Mar 17, 2008 - 12:09 PM   
 By:   MikeJ   (Member)

I had completely forgotten that Chad Redding was in that Season One episode with Tony Musante.

Man, you could not have cast a better actor to play THAT scumbag... well, except maybe Ray Sharkey... wink

I recently watched a Second Season episode with Chad Redding, A HOME OF THEIR OWN, I think it was called... She was pretty good as McCall's police liason.

And Ron O'Neal was an excellent replacement for Steven Williams. While I wish they had kept Williams around, it was great having THIS actor as his replacement. The only problem is... They didn't keep O'Neal around for very long, either.

But I always enjoyed O'Neal's combined flustered/flabbergasted reaction to McCall's antics.

 
 Posted:   Mar 17, 2008 - 1:13 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

Dan Hedaya IS DICK NIXON!

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 27, 2008 - 2:46 PM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)

I recently watched a Second Season episode with Chad Redding, A HOME OF THEIR OWN, I think it was called... She was pretty good as McCall's police liaison.

That happens to be one of our favorite eps for Round Two (especially the poignant song that so touchingly brackets the beginning and end).



And Ron O'Neal was an excellent replacement for Steven Williams. While I wish they had kept Williams around, it was great having THIS actor as his replacement. The only problem is ... They didn't keep O'Neal around for very long, either. But I always enjoyed O'Neal's combined flustered/flabbergasted reaction to McCall's antics.

We couldn't agree more and it was particularly nice those two always dealt with each other strictly on a personally professional HUMAN level that only added to the charming interplay.

Oh, and didja recognize O'Neal from his days as



What's really intriguing now when you watch the eps is that they've become almost an historical visual document for parts of midtown Manhattan that no longer exist.



We used to live at 54th and Broadway (up from Studio 54) and a lot of the Times Square locations spotlighted in the show have either been demolished, refurbished or Disneyized like some of 42nd street.



Wethink a lot of the city's colorful 1980s character only exists in shows like this which caught - and stopped - time for all tyme ...



And, yes, Season Two is upcoming, also (here, we mean) ... wink

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 29, 2008 - 7:17 AM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)

There's another indispensable aspect we haven't saluted in enough detail (tho it has been On The Other Side) and that's Stewart Copeland's



galvanizing theme and music.



Not to mention the other composers whose contributions also highly enhanced the series later on



(whom we'll pay proper tribute to, as well) ...

 
 Posted:   Mar 29, 2008 - 5:47 PM   
 By:   TheSaint   (Member)

12.Reign of Terror

BEE-U-TI-FULL Lonette McKee (Elly Watson),

Joe Maruzzo (as Head of the Punk Street Gang),

Tomas Milian (as McCall’s haunted KGB counterpart from the past),

And one of the most DYNAMIC guest-starring stints ever from
Fred Williamson (as Detective Mason Adams), former lover of Elly, whose one-man demolition derby visiting the gang’s hideout is so spectacular it’s the closest sequence ever to actually stealing McCall’s thunder.

Why o WHY didn’t they ever hook these two dynamos together in the same sequence?!!!!


I haven't watched this episode since it originally aired. Didn't like it the first time, don't like it the second time. McCall should've just blown those punks away. I had forgotten about how cool the Williamson sequence was-the highlight of my least favorite episode.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 30, 2008 - 8:27 AM   
 By:   Disco Stu   (Member)


What's really intriguing now when you watch the eps is that they've become almost an historical visual document for parts of midtown Manhattan that no longer exist.
We used to live at 54th and Broadway (up from Studio 54) and a lot of the Times Square locations spotlighted in the show have either been demolished, refurbished or Disneyized like some of 42nd street.



Wethink a lot of the city's colorful 1980s character only exists in shows like this which caught - and stopped - time for all tyme ...


So much has gone lost.
Those series have a completely different air about them. It's the hazy video effect, the fashion of the 80's (which up to '88 I really love by the way). This series has the same feel as "Night heat" which I prefer to the "Equalizer" (and I sincerely wish it will be properly released on DVD).
Even "Sledge Hammer" has that feel a bit although that series feels more like a late 60's thing.
The street visuals are always a source for me to watch a series of film.

D.S.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 30, 2008 - 11:00 AM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)

You bring up a compelling perspective re the in-house Look of certain shows, Disc.

One thing that became apparent after a coupla years during our Reviewing enterprise a few lifetimes ago is that it appeared certain networks had their own visual elan, also.

Whether twas the film stock or not, a



show looked different and had a certain kind of sheen that an



or



effort didn't. Now someone more professionally versed in that side of the biz - ala our venerable Sir M - would be far more an authority on this but it was a unique side effect, all the same ...

 
 Posted:   Mar 31, 2008 - 11:10 AM   
 By:   MikeJ   (Member)

The one thing that used to crack me up about some of the sets they used to use was all the mannequins people seemed to have lying around in their lofts...

I mean, once or twice, ok... but this happened MANY times.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 6, 2008 - 8:37 AM   
 By:   tgrocki   (Member)

I've just found out about this message board and now I am joining in. I am the guy who posted "Equalizer Fun" on youtube. I was an Assistant Editor on "The Equalizer" for seasons 2-4 as well as a Sound Re-Recordist for season #1. I was the biggest fan of the show that was actually working on the editing crew. It was my first editing job of my career and unlike most film editing jobs that go for 9-12 months, this job lasted for 3 1/2 years. We had a large crew because we had three teams rotating show by show, so it was like a big family. We also had hiatus in the summer, so the whole cycle of the show felt just like college. It was a great experience! If anybody has any questions about what it was like I would love to elaborate. I was so happy to see this message board because I did not know there was so much interest and I'm happy to see that everyone appreciates the great work that was done, especially by the writers and the actors. All the editors on the show were feature film editors from New York. The Executive Producer, the late Jim McAdams, kept the show in New York for editing so that he could retain more control and keep it away from the Universal Studios power structure in LA. We believed that the staff editors at Universal would not give the show it's edgy New York feel that NY feature film editors would. At least that was the story that we believed on the NY crew. I'd love to talk about this memorable time in my life!

tgrocki

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 6, 2008 - 8:39 AM   
 By:   tgrocki   (Member)

I also just ordered the DVD set of season one from Amazon after reading the reviews that said the quality was good. I was burned last year when I purchased a complete set of the show that was some sort of bootleg or whatever and it was the worst quality DVD I have ever seen. Fortunately, they knew it too and refunded my money as soon as I asked for it. I can't wait for the other seasons. Even though I didn't join the actual editing staff until season 2, I was very involved with the show on season #1 while working in the mixing studio for all the season 1 shows as a re-recordist.

 
 Posted:   Apr 6, 2008 - 10:41 AM   
 By:   MikeJ   (Member)

Wow, thanks for putting that montage together for youtube, tgrocki!

I'm sure I'm not alone in saying Welcome to the board here and we would love to here your comments about the Second Season and beyond.

Perhaps it is time for neotrinity to begin his Second Season breakdown...

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 6, 2008 - 10:56 AM   
 By:   tgrocki   (Member)

I'm not exactly sure that "Blood and Wine" would be my all-time favorite episode. I loved the two-parter "Memories of Manon", and my favorite one-part episode might very well be "Beyond Control". I like the latter pick because it gets into the CIA backstory a bit, the former because I worked on it, and his co-star Anne Heywood was such a dish for McCall from his past. I also like the one where Mickey Kostmeyer is being brainwashed in a sensory deprivation tank, mainly because my temp sound mix was used as a model for the final sound treatment in the show. There were lots of other really good ones that I would have to look at some again to decide. It's been such a long time.

Tgrock

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 6, 2008 - 10:58 AM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)

EQUALIZER ALERT: If you wanna see and laugh out loud at one of the funniest, fall down hilarious gag reels ever, you've gotta beam over to YouTube and take a glorious gander at tgrocki's "Equalizer Fun" opus.

(Especially Mr. Woodward's glorious "tirade" vis-a-vis Wendy's and, especially, Herb ("who the hell is Herb?!" - the tag line is magnificently memorable!)

We've already written you over on YouTube (and was pleasantly surprised to see your letter in response this afternoon), Meester Tee, so, by all means, share any and everything you've a hankering to.

Such inside status adds a seminal stroke of inspiration to anchoring our appreciation for this super series.

And, yes, Big M, the Second Season overview will begin this week.

Man, with HooRaq's Big Valley Yum and Meester T's wondrous arrival, wow, wotta week! ...

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 6, 2008 - 4:31 PM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)

"Blood and Wine" is probably tied with "Memories of Manon" as far as our favorite two-parters are concerned, with "Beyond Control" probably THE most representative Control ep (except for "Trial by Ordeal" which has a fabulous closing line that equals what he says in "Beyond Control"!).

As for the fetching Miss Heywood, you're thinking of the second two-parter focusing on McCall's past, "The Mystery of Manon" which has her impersonating the title character (or is she really her?).

It's also highly ironic that both Heywood and Sandy Dennis (the first incarnation of McCall's wife Kay) garnered late 60s notoriety playing doomed (well, one of 'em, anyway)



in



...

 
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