Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2012 - 7:38 AM   
 By:   Eric Paddon   (Member)

Maybe under the terms of his leaving Intertect, Lew Wickersham agreed to foot the bill for all of Joe's expenses as an independent PI if that would keep him away forever! big grin

 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2012 - 12:00 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Eric, given your preference for the first season, have you picked up the rest of the series?

 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2012 - 12:28 PM   
 By:   Eric Paddon   (Member)

I've got all the seasons released. This is the kind of show where I like to sample individual episodes based more on who's in them as opposed to going through every episode of each season. Enjoyed the later season guest shots of one of my favorites, Nancy Kovack who got some really good guest turns on this show compared to how she was wasted on other shows.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2012 - 1:53 PM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

I've got all the seasons released. This is the kind of show where I like to sample individual episodes based more on who's in them as opposed to going through every episode of each season. Enjoyed the later season guest shots of one of my favorites, Nancy Kovack who got some really good guest turns on this show compared to how she was wasted on other shows.


The three episodes with Nancy Kovack are all about her intimate relationship with Mannix (Mike Connors). The three episodes with her succeed in giving the story a special meaning.

 
 Posted:   Sep 18, 2012 - 3:28 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Just as Mission: Impossible has different "eras", I think that each season of Mannix has a different "flavor." I'll have to go through seasons 2-4 again before I can determine their characteristics, but I do notice a different atmosphere in almost every season.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 18, 2012 - 3:49 PM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Just as Mission: Impossible has different "eras", I think that each season of Mannix has a different "flavor." I'll have to go through seasons 2-4 again before I can determine their characteristics, but I do notice a different atmosphere in almost every season.

I partly agree with you.

I will try to divide the series into its stages of evolution.

The Intertect Year (season 1)
The Classic Paseo Verde Years (season 2 to 3)
The Modern Paseo Verde Years (season 4 to 5)
The Post-Barry Crane Years (season 6 to 8)

Barry Crane was associate producer from season 1 to 5 and left his imprint.
Executive producer Bruce Geller supervised the series from season 1 to 3.
Wilton Schiller produced season 1.
Ben Robert & Ivan Goff produced the series from season 2 to 8.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 18, 2012 - 5:55 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

Just as Mission: Impossible has different "eras", I think that each season of Mannix has a different "flavor." I'll have to go through seasons 2-4 again before I can determine their characteristics, but I do notice a different atmosphere in almost every season.

I partly agree with you.

I will try to divide the series into its stages of evolution.

The Intertect Year (season 1)
The Classic Paseo Verde Years (season 2 to 3)
The Modern Paseo Verde Years (season 4 to 5)
The Post-Barry Crane Years (season 6 to 8)

Barry Crane was associate producer from season 1 to 5 and left his imprint.
Executive producer Bruce Geller supervised the series from season 1 to 3.
Wilton Schiller produced season 1.
Ben Robert & Ivan Goff produced the series from season 2 to 8.


Mannix's house that was featured on seasons two through five was actually a house in Palos Verdes, California (my aunt showed me the front of the house once).

 
 Posted:   Dec 7, 2012 - 1:48 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Mannix season eight arrived today. The 1974-75 season. The last year pop culture mattered.*

Thanks to CBS/Paramount for getting the entire series out on DVD in just four years, and that includes an entire year without a release in 2009. It would have been nice if they had included the Diagnosis Murder episode "Hard Boiled Murder" along with the S7 set.

These episodes haven't ever been shown in syndication, have they? Can't wait to dig into the recession-era drabness with Joe "No Insurance Company Will Cover Him" Mannix.

Too bad there isn't more discussion about vintage TV show scoring outside of the Roddenberry thing around this place, because Mannix boasted some superb scoring throughout its eight-year run.

Now that I have the whole series, perhaps I'll painstakingly review every damn episode here and occasionally bump one of the thirty billion dan the man topics that suddenly cropped up after that wonderful month-long hiatus. wink

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 7, 2012 - 1:56 PM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Mannix season eight arrived today. The 1974-75 season. The last year pop culture mattered.*

Thanks to CBS/Paramount for getting the entire series out on DVD in just four years, and that includes an entire year without a release in 2009. It would have been nice if they had included the Diagnosis Murder episode "Hard Boiled Murder" along with the S7 set.

These episodes haven't ever been shown in syndication, have they? Can't wait to dig into the recession-era drabness with Joe "No Insurance Company Will Cover Him" Mannix.

Too bad there isn't more discussion about vintage TV show scoring outside of the Roddenberry thing around this place, because Mannix boasted some superb scoring throughout its eight-year run.

Now that I have the whole series, perhaps I'll painstakingly review every damn episode here and occasionally bump one of the thirty billion dan the man topics that suddenly cropped up after that wonderful month-long hiatus. wink






“There’s an old Armenian proverb: the man works best who works alone.”
—Private Eye Joe Mannix from “The Color of Murder”.

 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2013 - 11:57 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I'm now suffering from post-Paseo depression because I have finished off the eighth and final season of Mannix. "Hardball" was the last episode broadcast and it isn't a bad episode by any stretch but for a final episode it is a disappointment. There is no Gail Fisher, no Paseo Verde, and Mannix is strictly a spare part in his own show.The episode does boast William Windom who has far too little screen time and a pre-fame John Ritter. I know big time series finales were the exception rather than the rule in 1970s TV and I wonder if the cast and crew even knew the program was being canceled, but a better, more Mannix-like episode could have been chosen for the series swan song, or even season finale.

Now, venerable, sport jacketed thread--return to the bottom until I summon you once again, for Mannix will always get back up from a bludgeoning.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2013 - 1:47 PM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

I'm now suffering from post-Paseo depression because I have finished off the eighth and final season of Mannix. "Hardball" was the last episode broadcast and it isn't a bad episode by any stretch but for a final episode it is a disappointment. There is no Gail Fisher, no Paseo Verde, and Mannix is strictly a spare part in his own show.The episode does boast William Windom who has far too little screen time and a pre-fame John Ritter. I know big time series finales were the exception rather than the rule in 1970s TV and I wonder if the cast and crew even knew the program was being canceled, but a better, more Mannix-like episode could have been chosen for the series swan song, or even season finale.

Now, venerable, sport jacketed thread--return to the bottom until I summon you once again, for Mannix will always get back up from a bludgeoning.




I just started watching season 8: three episodes with an original score.
There is one episode (“Enter Tami Okada”) that plays like a proto-"Rush Hour".

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2013 - 2:05 PM   
 By:   quiller007   (Member)

My dvds of MANNIX arrived last week. I haven't started watching them yet.
I'm in the process of wrapping up season 3 of STREETS OF SAN FRANCISCO,
then I'll take a break and start on MANNIX.

Btw, the packaging for the complete set of MANNIX dvds is different
than if you purchase the seasons individually. I'm presuming the individual
seasons sets were packaged similarly to the HAWAII 5-0, MISSION IMPOSSIBLE
and WILD WILD WEST dvd sets - slimline cases housed in a cardboard
outer slipcase? Well, the MANNIX sets come in a flipper case no more thick
than a regular amaray dvd case (that holds one disc). Yet, these hold 5 or 6
discs (!). Pretty cool. Saves room. As for the cover artwork - it's exactly
the same as pictured on Amazon.

Den

 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2013 - 2:36 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

The individual sets of Mannix were all packaged just as yours are.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2013 - 2:39 PM   
 By:   Scott Atkins   (Member)

Just finished season 2 of Mannix the other day. I'm really enjoying the show. While no particular episode rates a four star masterpiece, the episodes are usually a very solid 3 stars. Mike Conners is always great in the title role. I'm looking forward to picking up season 3 sometime in the near future. First I want to finish up Police Woman season 1, season 2 of It Takes A Thief and season 5 of Mission: Impossible. This vintage TV is wonderful fun to watch. Great scores, tight scripts, terrific character actors and one does not have to worry about offensive material.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2013 - 2:44 PM   
 By:   quiller007   (Member)

The individual sets of Mannix were all packaged just as yours are.

Ah...I didn't know that. I guess Paramount decided to start packaging most
of their tv series in those flipper cases. I like 'em better, especially more so than
those annoying sets that unfold panel-by-panel with each disc housed on a
hard plastic tray - like the STARSKY AND HUTCH sets.

Den

 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2013 - 2:50 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

They also did that with Five-O. IIRC beginning with season nine has the pages-of-a-book thing like Mannix does, only Five-O's included a cardboard slipcase to "conform" to the previous seasons. But then you probably knew that.

By the way, Mike Connors' intros for the S1 episodes are amusing in that he often describes the episode where he'll say "In this episode, [name of guest star] hires ME to investigate..." Gotta love how Mike truly IS Mannix. cool Yes. Yes, he is. He always will be.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 10, 2013 - 2:53 PM   
 By:   quiller007   (Member)

Just finished season 2 of Mannix the other day. I'm really enjoying the show. While no particular episode rates a four star masterpiece, the episodes are usually a very solid 3 stars. Mike Conners is always great in the title role. I'm looking forward to picking up season 3 sometime in the near future. First I want to finish up Police Woman season 1, season 2 of It Takes A Thief and season 5 of Mission: Impossible. This vintage TV is wonderful fun to watch. Great scores, tight scripts, terrific character actors and one does not have to worry about offensive material.


All good stuff! Any 50's, 60's or 70's series about spies, private eyes,
police dramas are great. I'm surprised at how well they've all aged.
I'll go so far to say the police and detective shows from the 60's and
70's have aged better than almost any other genre of tv.
Even revisiting ones from the 80's, like REMINGTON STEELE,
MATT HOUSTON, RIPTIDE, MIKE HAMMER, MIAMI VICE...
are like a breath of fresh air and far superior to the current miserable
crud on tv. I pretty much hate all tv from 1990 to the present.
And it continues to get worse.

Den

 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2013 - 8:09 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

No matter the decade, the private eye will always hold a special appeal. They are always on the outside of everything but use their status as societal outsiders to defend it against the corrupt elements within it. Does that make sense? It did before I started typing it.

Mannix is a bit more of an "Establishment" kind of private eye, at least on the surface, as he's supposed to be strictly by the book. He also has the closest and most cordial "working relationship" with the police in P.I. history! But there's still an independent streak about him that makes him just as much of a "rebel" as Philip Marlowe or Jim Rockford.

Mannix ran eight seasons and was uniformly (and I don't mean in the plaid-jacketed sense) solid throughout its run. There were some uninspired episodes, but nothing truly awful. There were no "Shark Jumping" moments. I believe the show had the same producers for seven seasons and boasted some of the best composers working on it. A criminally underrated show and one I only saw briefly in syndication almost thirty years ago. It's completionon DVD--minus the fourth season "Diagnosis: Murder" episode which is more Mannix than Dr. Mark Sloan--didn't even seem possible six years ago. I am SO glad it's available and looking magnificent.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2013 - 2:33 PM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)




All good stuff! Any 50's, 60's or 70's series about spies, private eyes,
police dramas are great. I'm surprised at how well they've all aged.
I'll go so far to say the police and detective shows from the 60's and
70's have aged better than almost any other genre of tv.
Even revisiting ones from the 80's, like REMINGTON STEELE,
MATT HOUSTON, RIPTIDE, MIKE HAMMER, MIAMI VICE...
are like a breath of fresh air and far superior to the current miserable
crud on tv. I pretty much hate all tv from 1990 to the present.
And it continues to get worse.

Den




I agree with you except for the 80's thing.
Why these vintage cops and robbers series were so good: the actors!
These vintage actors had personas.
Since the grand classics are available, I wish we could obtain the short-lived
detective series as "The Outsider" (starring Darren McGavin) and "Longstreet" (starring James Franciscus) or the cop series as "Dan August" (starring Burt Reynolds)

 
 Posted:   Feb 11, 2013 - 7:07 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Hey, I'm pouring my heart out with my love of Mannix here!

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2014 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.