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 Posted:   Oct 22, 2009 - 9:33 AM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

The Bush administration gave us the word "robust" (obviously test marketed before being employed in public).

RUMSFIEld: "we have a ROBUST foreign policy"

pathetic



The Bush administration may have abused the word, but they only borrowed it. It's a fine word on its own.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 22, 2009 - 9:33 AM   
 By:   Gordon Reeves   (Member)



“Back in the day …”.

When most of these pretentious whippersnappers



weren’t even outta diapers yet (and still aren't) roll eyes

 
 Posted:   Oct 22, 2009 - 9:35 AM   
 By:   David Sones (Allardyce)   (Member)

The Bush administration gave us the word "robust" (obviously test marketed before being employed in public).

RUMSFIEld: "we have a ROBUST foreign policy"

pathetic



The Bush administration may have abused the word, but they only borrowed it. It's a fine word on its own.


ROBUST has become a sorely misabused word in the workplace. Corporations use it as a buzz word when describing how they want to improve this and that to offer "a more robust user experience". I hate it. Cheese is robust. A business process is not.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 22, 2009 - 10:03 AM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

"Our newest FUSION drink is a blend of ground seaweed and exotic tropical fruit flavors."

"Martin Scorsese's latest comedy is IN-YOUR-FACE FUNNY! A LAUGH-RIOT FROM BEGINNING-TO-END. I COULDN'T STOP LAUGHING."

"Jennifer Aniston's latest film WILL BE ON EVERY CRITIC'S SHORT LIST COME OSCAR-TIME."

"ARGUABLY THE GREATEST FILM OF THIS OR ANY OTHER YEAR."

"ARGUABLY THE FUNNIEST COMEDY SO FAR THIS YEAR."

"ARGUABLY THE ACTION-THRILLER OF THIS SEASON."

"WHEN THEY TALK ABOUT CLASSIC FILMS, THIS WILL BE AT THE TOP OF EVERYONE'S LIST."

"IF YOU SEE ONLY ONE FILM THIS YEAR, LET IT BE_______!"




....and, of course, OF COURSE---one of my personal favorite usages. smile

 
 Posted:   Oct 22, 2009 - 10:26 AM   
 By:   mark ford   (Member)

Dis, dissing or any other derivation of disrespect that uses it as a verb. Although it can be used transitively it still just doesn't sound quite right and has become just too poser hip.

 
 Posted:   Oct 22, 2009 - 10:38 AM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

The Bush administration gave us the word "robust" (obviously test marketed before being employed in public).

RUMSFIEld: "we have a ROBUST foreign policy"

pathetic



The Bush administration may have abused the word, but they only borrowed it. It's a fine word on its own.


ROBUST has become a sorely misabused word in the workplace. Corporations use it as a buzz word when describing how they want to improve this and that to offer "a more robust user experience". I hate it. Cheese is robust. A business process is not.



I've most often seen "robust" used in describing wines. I've never seen it associated with cheese outside of this thread, but I can imagine it's being applicable to certain cheeses.

Merriam-Webster Main Entry: ro·bust
Pronunciation: \ro-'b?st, 'ro-(?)b?stFunction: adjective
Etymology: Latin robustus oaken, strong, from robor-, robur oak, strength
Date: 1533
1 a : having or exhibiting strength or vigorous health b : having or showing vigor, strength, or firmness c : strongly formed or constructed : sturdy d : capable of performing without failure under a wide range of conditions
2 : rough, rude
3 : requiring strength or vigor
4 : full-bodied ; also : hearty

5 : of, relating to, resembling, or being a relatively large, heavyset australopithecine (especially Australopithecus robustus and A. boisei) characterized especially by heavy molars and small incisors adapted to a vegetarian diet — compare gracile 3

synonyms see healthy

— ro·bust·ly adverb

— ro·bust·ness \-'b?s(t)-n?s, -(?)b?s(t)-\ noun

 
 Posted:   Nov 30, 2009 - 11:44 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

"Let's do lunch."

"I don't do [blank]."

 
 Posted:   Dec 1, 2009 - 12:10 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I also don't like it when people use the words "I mean" as some sort of placeholder. So let's put an end to that one, too.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 1, 2009 - 12:45 PM   
 By:   Foodman   (Member)



"Irregardless"

I hope you don't mind me making a correction Mastadge, but there is no such word as irregardless. There is only the word regardless. This is a very common word usage error.


 
 Posted:   Dec 1, 2009 - 12:50 PM   
 By:   LeHah   (Member)

Can I put "(Pop Culture Reference)" and have it mean a bunch of things? Somewhere between The Simpsons and the middle of Buffy, that type of writing really became awful.

 
 Posted:   Dec 1, 2009 - 1:09 PM   
 By:   The Projectionist   (Member)

I absolutely hate phrase "My Baby Daddy".

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 2, 2009 - 5:10 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

Thats so gay, I hate that one so much, very derogatory toward gay people. What is means is gay = stupid

Lots of people use this phrase ironically.

 
 Posted:   Dec 3, 2009 - 2:11 AM   
 By:   Jehannum   (Member)

In fact a lot of this is second-hand pseud that people who wish to APPEAR sophisticated use to show they're 'original'. Originality is essential in the arts but not always in everyday speech. Oscar Wilde at the breakfast table would be terribly dull after a while.

People who wish to appear sophisticated portray themselves as a level up from everybody else. There are those who use cliches unthinkingly and there are those who criticise them, but one who wished to appear sophisticated would put himself above both.

 
 Posted:   Dec 3, 2009 - 2:19 AM   
 By:   Jehannum   (Member)

Business-speak is full of horrific examples.

A raft of proposals - is this what you need to escape the sinking ship?

logistics - delivery drivers

pro-active - makes me think of yoghurt with 'good' bacteria.

solutions - nastily overused company name cliche

It's the language of fakers and self-promoters, which means you can quickly spot them when they try to sell you their shit.

 
 Posted:   Dec 15, 2009 - 6:13 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

"Passing; Passed; Pass Away"

Has the world become so afraid to deal with death that we must "soften" the blow by using this "Passed away" nonsense? Is anyone else old enough to remember when people actually died?

"The soldier passed away after stepping on a land mine."

 
 Posted:   Dec 22, 2009 - 9:51 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

"Meh." God, how I hate that. And let's also bounce the frig out of those who stammer in message board posts--as in "uhm" and "er"-- to show how ironically "befuddled" they are by someone else's remark. I can't stand that crap.

Let's also give the gold watch to "[fill in blank] much?"

 
 Posted:   Dec 22, 2009 - 10:18 AM   
 By:   DavidinBerkeley   (Member)

"Passing; Passed; Pass Away"

Has the world become so afraid to deal with death that we must "soften" the blow by using this "Passed away" nonsense? Is anyone else old enough to remember when people actually died?

"The soldier passed away after stepping on a land mine."


Seconded.

 
 Posted:   Dec 22, 2009 - 10:52 AM   
 By:   Ray Faiola   (Member)

Unprecedented transparency

 
 Posted:   Dec 24, 2009 - 10:32 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

"Passing; Passed; Pass Away"

Has the world become so afraid to deal with death that we must "soften" the blow by using this "Passed away" nonsense? Is anyone else old enough to remember when people actually died?

"The soldier passed away after stepping on a land mine."


I've mentioned this one twice already. Must be a personal "favorite." wink

 
 Posted:   Dec 25, 2009 - 8:38 AM   
 By:   Jehannum   (Member)

"Happy holidays" instead of "Happy Christmas". Actually, there've always been euphemisms like "compliments of the season" or "good tidings" but none that's a subversion of the actual greeting.

 
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