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 Posted:   Apr 8, 2014 - 2:33 PM   
 By:   zooba   (Member)

IMDB offers this:

The original score was composed by Ennio Morricone. However, Morricone's score was rejected after some initial screen tests. No explanation for the rejection has ever been given by the director or producers.





I love Morricone's score. Did the test audiences find it too "European" or too beautiful and spiritual?


I've always enjoyed Michael Kamen's music. Haven't really seen the whole film with Kamen's score but the little that I did hear, didn't have the depth and beauty I heard in Morricone's. Need to listen to more and see the film completely.

Your thoughts?

Thanks,

Zoob

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 8, 2014 - 2:48 PM   
 By:   JamesSouthall   (Member)

Kamen said it was rejected because the filmmakers thought it was "too liturgical."

It's my number one film music holy grail. The bootleg has almost painfully beautiful music on it, but the sound quality's dire (and it's reportedly nowhere near the full score).

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 8, 2014 - 3:10 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

I remember Morricone did a seminar at the Pacific Design Center here in Los Angeles for the Society of Composers and Lyricists at about that time. Paraphrasing the question someone asked "what did you think of the producers rejecting your score because it was too dark and somber?" Morricone (in Italian) began calmly saying "I have no problem with that criticism, but if that is the case..." and then he got out of his chair and practically shouted at us "...why didn't they come to me, the composer they hired to score the film, to CORRECT THE SITUATION?!!!!" The roomful of mainly fellow composers responded with some deafening applause. It was his only rejected full score in a career of 500 of them (THE BIBLE was a partially done score) and it put him off of Hollywood product, of which he became pretty selective afterward.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 8, 2014 - 3:23 PM   
 By:   zooba   (Member)

I remember Morricone did a seminar at the Pacific Design Center here in Los Angeles for the Society of Composers and Lyricists at about that time. Paraphrasing the question someone asked "what did you think of the producers rejecting your score because it was too dark and somber?" Morricone (in Italian) began calmly saying "I have no problem with that criticism, but if that is the case..." and then he got out of his chair and practically shouted at us "...why didn't they come to me, the composer they hired to score the film, to CORRECT THE SITUATION?!!!!" The roomful of mainly fellow composers responded with some deafening applause. It was his only rejected full score in a career of 500 of them (THE BIBLE was a partially done score) and it put him off of Hollywood product, of which he became pretty selective afterward.

Bravo Ennio!

Same with Horner on ROMEO & JULIET

and Goldsmith and Bernstein on many.

Yeah Yeah, scheduling, smeduling!

Directors/producer's need to communicate with their composers. At least give them that respect.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 8, 2014 - 3:25 PM   
 By:   zooba   (Member)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zno7UyKs2J8

 
 Posted:   Apr 8, 2014 - 3:49 PM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

No, he also had his very first film score rejected which was also fully recorded.

And then there's others I'm still looking into.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 8, 2014 - 4:07 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

No, he also had his very first film score rejected which was also fully recorded.

And then there's others I'm still looking into.


Before IL FEDRALE? Incredible, what is the title? And what are your other ones you suspect?

 
 Posted:   Apr 8, 2014 - 4:11 PM   
 By:   La La Land Records   (Member)

Simply put: The film tested horribly (they ended up reshooting a bunch of it) and usually the first thing to go is the score (I actually saw the Morricone version years ago. I had a buddy at Interscope who got me into a screening). I can see why the producer's freaked because they had this $60 million arthouse flick with a gorgeous, albeit, unusual score. I personally felt it was incredible and that the film was pretty powerful as is.

The producer's also had a hard-on for Michael ever since Mr Holland's Opus and were more than happy to toss Morricone for Kamen.

Morricone's scores is one of my last Holy Grails!

As for that original cut it has a very depressing ending.

MV

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 8, 2014 - 4:37 PM   
 By:   JamesSouthall   (Member)


Morricone's scores is one of my last Holy Grails!


It's possibly my very last one. I hope you're able to do it justice some day (saying that, I have no idea what blocks may exist to a release).

 
 Posted:   Apr 8, 2014 - 4:40 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

I used to own this but i stupidly loaned it to a "friend", who never bothered to return it
brm

ps wink

 
 Posted:   Apr 8, 2014 - 4:42 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

Kamen said it was rejected because the filmmakers thought it was "too liturgical."

).


that's pretty much it.
the film deals with the afterlife in a non-religious manner.
ennio scored it with a Roman Catholic 'feel'
brm

 
 Posted:   Apr 8, 2014 - 4:47 PM   
 By:   SchiffyM   (Member)

Directors/producer's need to communicate with their composers. At least give them that respect.

I don't think lack of communication is the problem. Most composers I know wish the director or producer would shut up and leave him alone every so often!

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 8, 2014 - 4:55 PM   
 By:   riotengine   (Member)

I used to own this but i stupidly loaned it to a "friend", who never bothered to return it
brm

ps wink


Okay, okay, okay. I'll bring it back the next visit, you goof. wink

Greg Espinoza

 
 Posted:   Apr 8, 2014 - 5:06 PM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)


Before IL FEDRALE? Incredible, what is the title? And what are your other ones you suspect?


LE PILLOLE DI ERCOLE (1960)
Replacement composer: Armando Trovajoli
Morricone has actually discussed the score once or twice in old interviews, though not at length.

Under investigation (which can take years):
"Highlander II: The Quickening"
Soundtrack! magazine reported this as an upcoming assignment for him, at the time)

"The Scarlet Letter"
I still don't know the precise details. This was before Bernstein.

"Vendetta"
Replacement composer Shaw said his first job scoring in sweden, was replacing Morricone.

"La Celestina"
Before Doyle (who was also not the final composer).

"A Civil Action"
For which he recorded an unknown amount of score. Unfortunately the one person who could have shed some light on, that I know of, passed away.

"Jesus: The Epic Mini series"
Replacement composer: Patrick Williams.

"A Midsummer Night's Dream"
Before Kilar (under "DEMOS" on my site).

"Bandits"
Which then went to Zimmer (who was too busy; they even offered to push the film back for him!), then to Moby (who was also too busy), and then finally to Christopher Young.


My site:
http://rejectedfilmscores.150m.com/list.html

 
 Posted:   Apr 8, 2014 - 5:21 PM   
 By:   LeHah   (Member)

The film was rejected because Vincent Ward is a freaking weirdo. Look no further than his pre-production on Alien 3 (a wooden planet filled with monks!) or the gorgeous looking but otherwise GODDAMN DEADLY AWFUL film River Queen from 2005(?).

 
 Posted:   Apr 8, 2014 - 5:32 PM   
 By:   Shaun Rutherford   (Member)

This absolutely deserves a release, and everyone should buy two.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 8, 2014 - 6:40 PM   
 By:   franz_conrad   (Member)

Simply put: The film tested horribly (they ended up reshooting a bunch of it) and usually the first thing to go is the score (I actually saw the Morricone version years ago. I had a buddy at Interscope who got me into a screening).

...

As for that original cut it has a very depressing ending.

MV


I think that's a major issue, if the ending was different. The ending they ended up with didn't work (in my opinion). But if the ending originally was depressing, well it can be a hard thing to get an audience to accept that... People would have 'not liked' that ending first, and the score was an incidental casualty that was written to serve that ending.

 
 Posted:   Apr 8, 2014 - 7:10 PM   
 By:   Khan   (Member)

This absolutely deserves a release, and everyone should buy two.

Yuuuuuuuuuuup.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 8, 2014 - 10:13 PM   
 By:   Dylan S   (Member)

MV - what was the original ending? (SPOILER) Could he not get her back from hell?

And did you get into a screening years after the official version came out or did you attend a test screening?

I would love to see the original cut.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 9, 2014 - 12:25 AM   
 By:   couvee   (Member)

Simply put: The film tested horribly (they ended up reshooting a bunch of it) and usually the first thing to go is the score (I actually saw the Morricone version years ago. I had a buddy at Interscope who got me into a screening). I can see why the producer's freaked because they had this $60 million arthouse flick with a gorgeous, albeit, unusual score.

Morricone's scores is one of my last Holy Grails!

MV


Bring it on! Bring it on! I still thank you for that incredible "Fat Man and Little Boy" release! What a gorgeous score. I play it very often, all 2 discs of it. Superb! Let La La Land release What Dreams May Come.

 
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