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 Posted:   Oct 23, 2005 - 1:21 PM   
 By:   Chris1770   (Member)

I have a few CDs in my collection I have great problems with. They skip. Some of them play only a bit better on my DVD player, some still keep skipping.

I list them here with the label's name. You may add more...

RCA Italy
- Rapprasaglia/La Battaglia Di Algeri
- Voyage Of Terror: The Achille Lauro Affair

CNR
- Great Epic Film Scores (El Cid, 55 Days At Peking, The Fall Of The Roman Empire, the Magnificent Showman)

Unicorn-Kanchana (they even change the color a bit)
- Moby Dick
- Wuthering Heights

[I'm just lucky that Psycho still plays fine...]


Anyone having the same trouble with those titels?

 
 Posted:   Oct 23, 2005 - 1:37 PM   
 By:   drivingmissdaisy   (Member)

Don't get me started on CD skipping. When I put a CD in and it starts skipping it is one of the only things that just burns me the wrong way so darn fast. I have found that many Sony Classical pieces have some issues in my CD player toward the 50min through and especially when they get close to 70-80minutes in length. I have also found that those CD cases you can buy that you can put lik 100 or 200 or 320 CD's in a black carrying case those were made by the DEVIL himself. I have found that if you put CD's in there, then shut it and open it and shut it and carry it around after a while the CD's on opposite sides start rubbing against each other. I can not tell you ENOUGH DO NOT buy these cause you will have many CD's scratched to hell, to name a few that are ruined, Apollo 13, Boys From Brazil, An American Tail etc. there any many others, but what I have done is, I still use the cases, but I put a white piece of paper over one side that holds 4 so the other side of CD's only rubs against the white paper and they don't scratch, I haven't had an issue yet. Then on the white paper I just write in what CD is beneath it. Sorry this is so long, but if I can help someone from saving their CD's from scratching in this respect it's worth it. Oh yah I forgot my Varese Boy Who Could Fly got scratched as well. I was not a happy camper.

Side note, do any of you have an issue playing some of your CDR's with labels in different players? My 1999 Nissan Pathfinder has an issue with CDR's ONLY with labels, it's like it's too thick or something and my folks car, once you put the CDR with label in you have to use tweesers to get them out. odd...

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 23, 2005 - 1:51 PM   
 By:   Don   (Member)

Side note, do any of you have an issue playing some of your CDR's with labels in different players?
__________________________________________________


This is (as far as I know) often the case when the label is not fixed perfectly on the surface. The CD gets slightly unbalanced then and the laser has problems to focus. I'd categorically NEVER label any CD.

 
 Posted:   Oct 23, 2005 - 2:34 PM   
 By:   MWRuger   (Member)

If you have a problem with CD's skipping or oxidizing you can try to make a back-up using a CD-RW burner. I have found that these drives make the best readers and can often read CDs that regular players can't.

Extract those files and burn a copy.

Also, try difficult CDs on different players. As a CD player gets older it gets pickier about what he will play. I think the laser gets out of alignment with time and some CDs require better alignment to play (CDs that are dirty, occluded or scratched. Usually I just burn a new copy and archive the troublemaker in case I need another copy at a later date.

Labeled CD-Rs in a player that grips is just asking for trouble. Those players are designed to handle CDs of a certain specification. Thicker ones will get stuck or sometimes the device will peel part of the label up. Very nasty.

 
 Posted:   Oct 23, 2005 - 2:48 PM   
 By:   WesllDeckers   (Member)

Maybe a problem with the player itself?
Dirty lens? Laserbeam disruptions?

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 23, 2005 - 3:06 PM   
 By:   Jaquandor   (Member)

Maybe a problem with the player itself?
Dirty lens? Laserbeam disruptions?


This is exactly what I was going to suggest. I've been using the same stereo for ten years now, and about four years ago, it started skipping pretty consistently on CDs, especially (as noted upthread) around the 60-minute mark, give or take a few minutes. A simple blasting-out of the innards of my stereo with a can of that compressed air stuff, followed by a cleaning of the lens with a slightly damp cotton swab, solved the problem immediately.

It happened again about a year ago, and the exact same progression of cleaning cleared it up again.

(Now, I do own CDs that are seriously mangled after being used exclusively in the car for years, but those are pretty obvious when you look at the underside of them.)

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 23, 2005 - 3:16 PM   
 By:   Toby The Swede   (Member)

Jerry Goldsmith`s Lionheart (Failed Knight) and James Horner`s Patriot Games (the last cue) is just a few of those ones in my collection that I have had some problems with when playing

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 23, 2005 - 3:28 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

This thread is about CDs "oxidizing" and skipping because of that.

I have over 6000 CDs and have been buying them since the early 80s - I have never had a problem with any of them playing. I do periodic checks of most of the soundtracks and they are all just fine, including every title mentioned here.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 23, 2005 - 4:00 PM   
 By:   Jaquandor   (Member)

This thread is about CDs "oxidizing" and skipping because of that.

Is it? The initial post in the thread doesn't even mention oxidizing, aside from the subject header, and no one else really mentions it either except for in passing. So far as I can tell, the thread's about CDs skipping until someone starts talking specifically about CDs oxidizing. (Here's a place to start: how can one tell that a CD is oxidizing? And that's a serious question, as I genuinely don't know.)

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 23, 2005 - 4:29 PM   
 By:   Miguel Andrade   (Member)

The only CDs that ever yellowed are a few Unikorn Kanchana discs (Herrmann, Tiomkin), still they just play fine.
I've never had any problem with pressed CDs, unless they are phisically damged -- i.e. scrateched.
But have been having problems with CD-Rs. Sometimes they don't even play. That happens mostly with early CD-Rs, stuff that I got in the late 90's.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 23, 2005 - 4:47 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)



Is it? The initial post in the thread doesn't even mention oxidizing, aside from the subject header, and no one else really mentions it either except for in passing. So far as I can tell, the thread's about CDs skipping until someone starts talking specifically about CDs oxidizing. (Here's a place to start: how can one tell that a CD is oxidizing? And that's a serious question, as I genuinely don't know.)


Um, when a header title is "When a CD goes kaput - they oxidize" then the original poster is talking about THAT. Others immediately started about CDs skipping, which could be for any number of reasons. But the header title is not a question, it's a statement or accusation and, as far as I'm concerned, a completely unfounded one in my experience. If I need to make anything clearer, Jaquandor, you just tell me and I'll be happy to oblige you.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 23, 2005 - 5:55 PM   
 By:   Andy   (Member)

i have the most of the first mentioned cds and they have the "bronzing"
got them replaced 5-6 years ago by the manufacturer

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 23, 2005 - 6:09 PM   
 By:   Joe E.   (Member)

Since the original topic (whatever it was) seems to be expanding to encompass all sorts of defects or issues that crop up with disc age, I'll throw in that a few years ago after noticing my Willow CD had gotten dusty and tacky (that should have been a warning) even while sitting in its closed jewel case, I went to rinse off the dust, and the label started washing off (!). It had looked like it was just black printed text, but it turned out there was a clear, filmlike label covering that entire side of the disc, and the text was printed on that rather than directly onto the plastic of the CD. The disc still plays fine, but the label looks rather messed-up now. This is the only age-related issue I've encountered in my collection, I think.

Yes, this was a legit CD, bought at retail in '88 (I still have the original long box it came in, complete with the Camelot Music price sticker on what's left of the shrinkwrap, and a paper ad insert for the Lucasfilm fan club).

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 23, 2005 - 9:44 PM   
 By:   Jaquandor   (Member)

Um, when a header title is "When a CD goes kaput - they oxidize" then the original poster is talking about THAT. Others immediately started about CDs skipping, which could be for any number of reasons. But the header title is not a question, it's a statement or accusation and, as far as I'm concerned, a completely unfounded one in my experience. If I need to make anything clearer, Jaquandor, you just tell me and I'll be happy to oblige you.

Yeah, all of which I perfectly understand, seeing as how that's exactly what I noted in my post. Duh.

My point, though, is that while the word "oxidize" is used in the subject head, the post headed by that topic says nothing whatsoever about CDs oxidizing, and neither does anyone else. And since I can't help but notice that you completely ignored my actual question about CDs oxidizing in favor of being snippy, I'll exercise my prerogative to ignore your ham-handed attempt at playing Topic-Cop.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 23, 2005 - 10:51 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

I didn't "ignore" your question - since I have never seen an example in twenty-three years of whatever people are calling "oxidizing", I have no answer to your question.

And what do you think the original poster was talking about? He put oxidizing in his header, and therefore I have to assume that is what his post was in reference to.

Enough with the anality, really.

I certainly have had CDs skip, and it's always a scratch or a glob of glue or dirt.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 23, 2005 - 11:27 PM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

I have had many CDs and laserdiscs that have simply "gone bad." Some bronze and become unplayable, or else they become semi-playable, only working on certain players and not on others that they should play on, because they did in the past and these players only have trouble playing these few particular discs. Some were the John Scott JOS releases, others were the Herrmann Unicorn releases.

I'll try to post an image of one of my favorites (hope the scanner can pick up the "flaw"). A few years ago I had read on some chat group about a particular Cliff Richard CD single ("Peace In Our Time") that was quickly "dying" in the collections of everyone who had it around the world. And it was on the EMI UK label -- not some fly-by-night company.

When I took out my copy to look at it, lo and behold, the same thing had happened to my copy. I made a CDR of it right away, which was a good thing, because six months later the original was unplayable on all eight of my CD players. This was CD-1 of a two-part CD set, and CD-2 did not have this problem for me. It looks like somebody took a steel wool pad to the reflective side of the CD and RUBBED!

I also have an Adrian Baker CD called ABCD that bronzed and became unplayable in about two years. I know first-hand of dozens of other examples like this, and don't get me started on Columbia laserdiscs! All I can say is Haines has a digital guardian angel or something, because these things ARE happening.

The proof that this is going on is that many people have the same identical problems with copies of the same identical CDs, and it often happens at the same identical timings on the CD. Too much of a coincidence there to blame it on dirt or other things. And it's NOT dirt or scratches when I can see that my copies are in flawless shape, and yet somehow somebody halfway across the world has the same exact problem. These are clearly defective discs of some type, and considering many of them played perfectly at one point, that's conclusive evidence that the CDs are not static but are changing over time.

I also recall the Jerry Goldsmith "Suites and Themes" CD -- I had three copies of that that simply couldn't play the last track (LIONHEART, I believe). Don't tell me there wasn't something wrong with those discs, because two came from my collection and a third from Tony Thomas' -- and all had the same glitch. It was probably a pressing glitch as opposed to the CD changing over time, although I seem to recall one of my "Suites and Themes" CDs playing perfectly at one time...


 
 
 Posted:   Oct 23, 2005 - 11:28 PM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

web site glitch made two posts -- or don't these digital glitches happen either?

 
 Posted:   Oct 24, 2005 - 1:44 AM   
 By:   MikeJ   (Member)

The pressing plant PDO in the UK produced discs that bronzed for labels such as JOS and Unicorn Kachana and Silva Screen, as well. I remember reading on the message boards many years back that someone had contacted PDO and they were replacing these bronzing discs. I sent a batch of mine in and they sent me back good discs. But this was a time sensitive offer and I have since talked to people who sent their discs in and received nothing. Look around the center ring of your CD. If you see MANUFACTURED BY PDO or some such on your bronzed discs then you know why they have bronzed.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 24, 2005 - 2:09 AM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

The Cliff CD I posted the image of says "EMI SWINDON" around the hub. Sir Cliff has certainly aged better than this particular release of his.

 
 Posted:   Oct 24, 2005 - 7:08 AM   
 By:   Chris1770   (Member)

I didn't "ignore" your question - since I have never seen an example in twenty-three years of whatever people are calling "oxidizing", I have no answer to your question.

And what do you think the original poster was talking about? He put oxidizing in his header, and therefore I have to assume that is what his post was in reference to.

Enough with the anality, really.

I certainly have had CDs skip, and it's always a scratch or a glob of glue or dirt.



Calm down! Other members in the forum used this expression (see Battle of Algiers thread, that put the idea in my head to start this thread. Oxidise/Oxidize - somebody gave a pretty good explanation what happens when a disc oxidizes - beyond scratches, dirt and/or finger prints (CDs are not supposed to be handled with cloves, are they?).

My CDs have been handled well. If I look at the Herrmann discs, they are as clean and proper as a babyface.

Moby Dick skipped from the moment I purchased it in 1992 (don't remember the exact year). But I didn't know then that it was a manufacturer problem. I've listened to it yesterday, or shall I better say tried to listen to it, because now, it's unlistenable. There's no way to burn a good CD-R, it skips in the burner too. I'm sure it will skip in a new player too.

Of course, my CD player is old, about 12 years or so. I've only listed titles above I thought they have a problem beyond visible reasons.

I have Delerues Deux Anglaises Sur Le Continent (by Milan), it bronzed but plays fine in my old player (wonderful score btw).

Do you think I can get those Unicorn folks to replace them. Maybe I just wait for the SACDs (anybody reading this...?).

There's another title, last track skips (both sides of the disc are in perfect shape):

The Edge, J. Goldsmith (RCA)

 
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