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 Posted:   May 28, 2012 - 11:05 AM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

As requested, here is the separate listing.

Kritzerland is pleased to present a new world premiere limited edition soundtrack – two great scores on one great CD:

I MARRIED A MONSTER FROM OUTER SPACE
Music Composed by Victor Young, Franz Waxman, Hugo Friedhofer, Aaron Copland, Hans J. Salter, Roy Webb, Nathan Van Cleave, Daniel Amfitheatrof, Leith Stevens, and others

and

THE ATOMIC CITY
Music Composed and Conducted by Leith Stevens

Bill and Marge – happy as clams, in love and about to be married. He’s affectionate, a dog lover, thoughtful – the perfect man. Until… he’s not. It’s a girl’s worst nightmare – the loving man she just married is suddenly not the man she thought he was. Why is he suddenly no longer affectionate? Why is he not affectionate to the dog? Why is he not affectionate to anything? Stranger still, why are some of the other men in their town behaving the same way? If only she’d seen the poster for this film, she’d have known exactly what was going on – because there’s no mistaking it with a title like I Married a Monster from Outer Space. Made in 1958, I Married a Monster from Outer Space is not as lurid as its title would suggest. It’s actually a very well made, thoughtful, low-budget sci-fi film with an excellent script, which has gathered a loyal following over the years. Starring Tom Tryon and Gloria Talbott, the film is a textbook example of how to make a terrific little film on a terrifically low budget.

One of the most interesting aspects of the film is its wonderful score. The film carries no credit for music at all, despite having really effective music and quite a bit of it. The reason for the lack of a music credit is simple: In 1958 there was a musicians’ union strike. And so Hollywood studios had to go outside the United States and Canada to record music for their movies. In certain cases, especially in the case of the very low-budget I Married a Monster from Outer Space, they would re-record selections from existing scores that were owned by the studio’s publishing companies. Therefore, what we have is a score composed by Victor Young, Hugo Friedhofer, Aaron Copland, Franz Waxman, Leith Stevens, Daniel Amfitheatrof, Walter Scharf, Lyn Murray, Nathan Van Cleave, Roy Webb – well, you get the idea. The surprising thing is how well it all works and how seamlessly it all plays. Today, it would be called temp tracking, but back then it was born out of necessity and budget. It’s actually kind of a once-in-a-lifetime occurrence, where several of the greatest film composers of all time have music in the same film.

The music, housed in the Paramount vaults, was in mostly excellent condition. A little wow and flutter on a couple of tracks was the only problem and we’ve left it as is because the music is so good and the problems only last for a few seconds.

Our second feature is a tense little low-budget thriller from 1952 called The Atomic City, starring Gene Barry, Lydia Clarke and Nancy Gates. The basic plot is simple: Enemy agents kidnap the son of a nuclear physicist in Los Alamos, New Mexico; their ransom demand isn’t money, however – the bad guys want the physicist to turn over the formula for the H-bomb. Directed by Jerry Hopper, the screenplay was written by Sydney Boehm, a great writer who wrote several great films, including When Worlds Collide, The Big Heat, Union Station, Violent Saturday, The Tall Men, The Revolt of Mamie Stover, Shock Treatment and many others. His screenplay for The Atomic City was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Story and Screenplay – very unusual for a low budget programmer in 1952.

The superb music was composed by Leith Stevens. Stevens made his mark in the early 1950s, beginning with two sci-fi scores that became instant classics – Destination Moon and When Worlds Collide. After The Atomic City, he would go on to write great scores to some iconic films, including War of the Worlds and The Wild One. He worked in almost every genre, turning out scores for such films as the noir classic The Hitch-Hiker, Scared Stiff, Private Hell 36, World Without End, Julie, But Not for Me, The Interns, A New Kind of Love and many others, as well as for such classic television fare as The Twilight Zone, Have Gun – Will Travel, Gunsmoke, The Untouchables, Burke’s Law, The Time Tunnel, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, Land of the Giants, and on and on. His music for The Atomic City is greatly responsible for the tense atmosphere and keeping the film an edge-of-the-seat thriller.

The music was thankfully preserved on a set of acetates in excellent condition. These were transferred as carefully and lovingly as possible, and we hope you’ll be pleased with the result.

I Married a Monster from Outer Space/The Atomic City is limited to 1000 copies only. The price is $19.98, plus shipping.

CD will ship the first week of July – however, never fear, preorders placed directly through Kritzerland usually ship one to five weeks earlier (we’ve been averaging four weeks early). To place an order, see the cover, or hear audio samples, just visit www.kritzerland.com.

 
 
 Posted:   May 28, 2012 - 11:25 AM   
 By:   Robert0320   (Member)

I ordered it in a heartbeat!

 
 
 Posted:   May 28, 2012 - 11:45 AM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

I wonder how many don't check in on this because of the title?
I wonder if you should have:

I MARRIED A MONSTER.. Friehofer, Waxman, Copland

Nah, it will probably sell out as is.

 
 
 Posted:   May 28, 2012 - 1:15 PM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

cant wait to get my copy! And thank you for the new thread. smile

 
 
 Posted:   May 28, 2012 - 2:02 PM   
 By:   Preston Neal Jones   (Member)

Henry, I think it would sell out if the Subject Heading simply read:

MONSTER - Salter

 
 
 Posted:   May 28, 2012 - 2:23 PM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

Great release. The Stevens score is a marvelous one. Would like to see a list of the films whose music was tracked into I MARRIED A MONSTER. Composers styles are easier to identify than the particular films, although some of us know a number of the film titles...

 
 
 Posted:   May 28, 2012 - 2:27 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

Great release. The Stevens score is a marvelous one. Would like to see a list of the films whose music was tracked into I MARRIED A MONSTER. Composers styles are easier to identify than the particular films, although some of us know a number of the film titles...

The list is included in the booklet - according to the paperwork there's stuff from Shane, Conquest of Space, So Evil, My Love, The Heiress, The Naked Jungle, Appointment with Danger, No Man of Her Own, Dark City, The Bridges at Toko-Ri and lots more.

 
 
 Posted:   May 28, 2012 - 2:28 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

I wonder how many don't check in on this because of the title?
I wonder if you should have:

I MARRIED A MONSTER.. Friehofer, Waxman, Copland

Nah, it will probably sell out as is.


Unfortunately in the headers here you only have a certain number of characters until it stops - there was no more room for the composers - and that's why I didn't originally have any of this title in the original thread's header.

 
 
 Posted:   May 28, 2012 - 3:41 PM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

the title might seem abit garish, but I suspect everyone who's gotten married has mentally switched the sentiment of having married an "Angel" to "Monster" every once in awhile.

 
 Posted:   May 28, 2012 - 10:09 PM   
 By:   Dana Wilcox   (Member)

From a kid who spent his Saturday afternoons in the balcony of the Roach Palace Theater, catching every sci fi or horror double feature that ever came through, my profoundest thanks!

 
 
 Posted:   May 28, 2012 - 10:19 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

From a kid who spent his Saturday afternoons in the balcony of the Roach Palace Theater, catching every sci fi or horror double feature that ever came through, my profoundest thanks!

I was right there - my theaters were the Lido, the Picfair and the Stadium - never missed anything, including I Married a Monster. Certain films are burned in my memory forever - seeing Invaders from Mars sometime around 1957 at the Lido on a triple bill - I know one of the other features was Invasion of the Saucer Men. It was a time of great fun and, more importantly, innocence.

 
 Posted:   May 28, 2012 - 10:52 PM   
 By:   Dana Wilcox   (Member)

From a kid who spent his Saturday afternoons in the balcony of the Roach Palace Theater, catching every sci fi or horror double feature that ever came through, my profoundest thanks!

I was right there - my theaters were the Lido, the Picfair and the Stadium - never missed anything, including I Married a Monster. Certain films are burned in my memory forever - seeing Invaders from Mars sometime around 1957 at the Lido on a triple bill - I know one of the other features was Invasion of the Saucer Men. It was a time of great fun and, more importantly, innocence.


I'm looking forward to your upcoming release of the full score from INVADERS FROM MARS!

 
 
 Posted:   May 29, 2012 - 1:17 AM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

From a kid who spent his Saturday afternoons in the balcony of the Roach Palace Theater, catching every sci fi or horror double feature that ever came through, my profoundest thanks!

I was right there - my theaters were the Lido, the Picfair and the Stadium - never missed anything, including I Married a Monster. Certain films are burned in my memory forever - seeing Invaders from Mars sometime around 1957 at the Lido on a triple bill - I know one of the other features was Invasion of the Saucer Men. It was a time of great fun and, more importantly, innocence.


I'm looking forward to your upcoming release of the full score from INVADERS FROM MARS!


My personal Holy Grail - if I had all the money in the world I would just do a new recording of it. That score is emblazoned in the windmills of my mind.

 
 Posted:   May 29, 2012 - 8:25 AM   
 By:   Charles Thaxton   (Member)

I never married any but dated a few (CD ordered!) wink

 
 Posted:   Jun 12, 2012 - 6:45 PM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)

I Married a Monster From Outer Space is obviously a more attention/sales-generating title than The Atomic City, but for me the superb Leith Stevens score (Atomic City) is the main feature here, with IMAMFOS a very worthy and entertaining bonus.
Because it is paired with IMAMFOS, some might be put off the Stevens score because they mistakenly think it is minor monster music for a minor monster film, but this isn't the case at all and it plays as a high class, exciting detective/noir-ish score. I've played The Atomic City three times and it is more impressive each time. Well worth the price of the CD on its own. Very good and clean sound too considering the source.
The IMAMFOS title will surely attract its audience of monster and cult film aficionados, but I hope it doesn't mislead people into thinking the Stevens score is something less than it is. This could slip under the radar of many who would appreciate it for the fine dramatic thriller score that it is.
Top marks for a score of its type.

 
 Posted:   Jun 14, 2012 - 4:46 AM   
 By:   Ray Worley   (Member)

I received this a couple of days ago and have given it a couple of listens. Boy, is this a fun release!

Listening to the score while looking at the cue assembly and trying to figure to figure out which cues you are listening to is a bit of a challenge. It seems as though some individual cues are only a few seconds long. One track has cues from 6 different movies in just barely over a minute (only 2 composers though, so it really makes it difficult to figure out which cue you are listening to!)

The really interesting thing about the score is that even with all the composers involved, whoever put this thing together managed to make it sound amazingly uniform. With careful listening some composer's individual styles come through in some cues, but in other cases, it would take a much better educated ear than mine to tell.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 14, 2012 - 8:02 PM   
 By:   Robert0320   (Member)

Love it. Thanks so much for releasing these two gems.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2012 - 3:46 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

Been giving this a few spins over the last couple of days. This is something I really bought as a souvenir of a fun (and scary at the time) movie - I MARRIED A MONSTER FROM OUTER SPACE! Wow!
Call me a bottlecap collector, but the music was actually a secondary consideration. Anyway, I thought it would be additional fun picking out the different styles of all those different composers mixed into the stew. And you know what? I was rubbish at it! I think Ray Worley had the same experience at first, right? The snippets are really so brief that I simply couldn't separate the Youngs from the Waxmans from the Webbs. I only managed to cry "Bingo" when I recognised five seconds of Friedhofer (and Leith Stevens - but I'll come to that). On the whole, nothing seems out of place in the score, but it does seem to have used some of the most nondescript cues from the multiple composers' back-catalogues. So, while nothing is jarring, it's not terribly cohesive either. The only sense of unity I got was when I heard the Copland bit (a threatening yet mournful two-note motif) in three different tracks. But the best thing in the score for me is the instantly recognisable style of Leith Stevens (that's the other one I "got", along with Friedhofer), maybe because he gets the longest uninterrupted running time in the film, but also because he's great. I even like the little dance band cues sprinkled throughout - they break up the otherwise fairly standard-sounding shenanigans in a fun way.

All in all, I feel that I MARRIED A MONSTER FROM OUTER SPACE is a lovely souvenir of a good little SF film, but I get the feeling that it'll please hardened addicts of the genre more than hardened completists of the scores of Victor Young, Franz Waxman et al.

Right, on to THE ATOMIC CITY. I must say I'm in complete agreement here with what Razzle Bathbone posted above - this is a terrific Leith Stevens score which might be in danger of being overlooked due to its "support feature" status on the CD. I love this score. Even if you've only ever heard DESTINATION MOON and WAR OF THE WORLDS you'll instantly recognise the Stevens trademarks. I hear a sense of lonely desolation in a lot of his work, and a feeling of quest, of searching for something. A lot of this could be space exploration music, but there's lots more to it than that. THE ATOMIC CITY is jam-packed with great stuff. We've got a little kind of nursery rhyme melody that goes through multiple variations (I suppose this depicts the plight and innocence of the kidnapped boy), some stark Native Indian hints for the ruins of their ancient city (it almost sounds Oriental - is that the Pentatonic scale?), but most of all some absolutely gripping and beautifully developed action material featuring dramatically swirling strings and complex, thrilling harmonies. There are no track times on the CD, but two of these amazing pieces last almost nine minutes each, and it flows beautifully. This is a brilliant score from a brilliant composer.

Oh, by the way, when I first put this CD on, I found the sound to be terribly tinny. Then I changed headphones and it sounded pretty terrific.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2012 - 6:07 AM   
 By:   Last Child   (Member)

After 40 seconds in, track #14 on "I Married a Monster" is virtually ripped right out of "When Worlds Collide" (track #16 and/or track #22 on the Intrada cd).

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2012 - 7:41 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

Last Child, change "virtually" for "literally" - it's the same cue, and credited on the Kritzerland disc. I can't wait to get my Intrada release of the full thing now!

 
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