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 Posted:   Jan 12, 2013 - 11:00 AM   
 By:   Scott Atkins   (Member)

The purpose of this thread is to dust off your collection and give a listen to a soundtrack CD that has not been played in quite some time. We all seem to get caught up in getting that next holy grail when in fact we have plenty of gold sitting right next to us in our own house. My goal is to “resurrect” at least 1 soundtrack CD a week and report back here. Does the score stand the test of time? Do I like it more now then when I first heard it? My first pick this week:

Clear and Present Danger-1994 composed by James Horner. Milan.





This is a solid score from Mr. Horner and holds up quite well. It’s much better than most action scores being composed today and much more enjoyable than latter day Horner. For me, the centerpiece of the score is the 9 minute and 50 second running cue “The Ambush”. This piece of music works great in the film and does something that recent action films have pretty much forgotten. Building suspense. It also works well apart from the picture. The score also has a nice sad but patriotic track with the last cue “Truth needs a soldier/End title". Great job by Mr. Horner and I’m happy to have this in the collection. My feelings on this score has not diminished.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 12, 2013 - 9:30 PM   
 By:   barryfan   (Member)

It has a great opening track and The Ambush is also pretty good, too. I listened to it not too long ago and liked it more than I remembered I did.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 12, 2013 - 10:21 PM   
 By:   jamesluckard   (Member)

The suspense music is very similar in style to his great score for The Pelican Brief. I remember taking music like that for granted at the time in the 90s. Pity, nobody is allowed to write anything like it anymore.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 12, 2013 - 11:03 PM   
 By:   Ian J.   (Member)



While on my exercise bike trying to get a bit fitter I've just started to pick out soundtracks on my MP3 player that I listen to less often. The first was 'Cutthroat Island' by John Debney. It's still the very bombastic score I remember it to be, but I'm noticing the occasional stylistic similarities to Williams and Horner in there that I hadn't particularly picked up on before. However, they aren't plagiaristic lifts, just tonally similar phrases.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2013 - 6:44 AM   
 By:   Scott Atkins   (Member)

The suspense music is very similar in style to his great score for The Pelican Brief. I remember taking music like that for granted at the time in the 90s. Pity, nobody is allowed to write anything like it anymore.

You are so right about taking a score like this for granted in the 90's! I think the problem now is that composers are not allowed to make strong statements. Many scores today are sound design that are really just part of the sound effect mix.

It has a great opening track and The Ambush is also pretty good, too. I listened to it not too long ago and liked it more than I remembered I did.

Yes! The opening track is great as well! The score CD runs just under 50 minutes and never wears out it's welcome.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2013 - 6:56 AM   
 By:   Scott Atkins   (Member)



While on my exercise bike trying to get a bit fitter I've just started to pick out soundtracks on my MP3 player that I listen to less often. The first was 'Cutthroat Island' by John Debney. It's still the very bombastic score I remember it to be, but I'm noticing the occasional stylistic similarities to Williams and Horner in there that I hadn't particularly picked up on before. However, they aren't plagiaristic lifts, just tonally similar phrases.


I would be interested in taking this score for a spin. I saw the film way back when and it didn't do much for me but I bet the soundtrack is a fun ride. I only have one John Debney soundtrack and that's The Passion of the Christ.

I found that John Carpenter's Ghost of Mars makes for terrific exercise music. The score is not for everyone. It's Carpenter meets heavy metal but it's energinic and keeps you motivated when working out.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2013 - 8:07 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

I haven't played CUTTHROAT ISLAND in years. Maybe that would be a good one to revisit. But yes, I seem to recall that much of it is kind of reheated Horner, Williams etc. I think the review in the print edition of FSM at the time had some amusing comments such as "And it's Williams over to Horner, Horner passes it onto Silvestri" etc.

 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2013 - 8:25 AM   
 By:   Peter Greenhill   (Member)




Bought this score on CD in 2004 played it a few times, liked it but it got put to the bottom of the pile due to the mass of wonderful releases we've had in recent years.

Revisited it today and what a great score. I regret not listening to it more in recent years. Emotional, exciting, gorgeous music. I'm blown away by this one.

I'm not familiar with the movie but recently picked up the Alexander Revisited Blu-Ray, so look forward to seeing how it works with the images in the near future.

BTW Thanks Scott for mentioning 'Clear and Present Danger'. Will give it a listen this week.

 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2013 - 8:52 AM   
 By:   judy the hutt   (Member)

Clear and Present Danger. Good choice. Will do.

Will try to get in some more as well.

Judy

 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2013 - 9:14 AM   
 By:   Mr Greg   (Member)



While on my exercise bike trying to get a bit fitter I've just started to pick out soundtracks on my MP3 player that I listen to less often. The first was 'Cutthroat Island' by John Debney. It's still the very bombastic score I remember it to be, but I'm noticing the occasional stylistic similarities to Williams and Horner in there that I hadn't particularly picked up on before. However, they aren't plagiaristic lifts, just tonally similar phrases.


Good choice!!!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2013 - 10:57 AM   
 By:   Scott Atkins   (Member)




Bought this score on CD in 2004 played it a few times, liked it but it got put to the bottom of the pile due to the mass of wonderful releases we've had in recent years.

Revisited it today and what a great score. I regret not listening to it more in recent years. Emotional, exciting, gorgeous music. I'm blown away by this one.

I'm not familiar with the movie but recently picked up the Alexander Revisited Blu-Ray, so look forward to seeing how it works with the images in the near future.

BTW Thanks Scott for mentioning 'Clear and Present Danger'. Will give it a listen this week.


The only Vangelis CD's I have are The 1994 release of Blade Runner, the New American orchestra recording of Blade Runner and his Themes album. I've only seen parts of Alexander and was stunned by how bad it was. That being said, I would be willing to give the Alexander Revisited cut a chance. The score CD by Vangelis is intriguing. I never gave it a listen or picked it up probably because of the movies reputation. I'll be on the lookout for this one.

Clear and Present Danger. Good choice. Will do.

Will try to get in some more as well.

Judy


I look forward to your picks Judy! Dust off that collection!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2013 - 12:22 PM   
 By:   catboy19   (Member)

I'm still not sure how to post a picture in a post.

Maybe someone can tell me?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2013 - 1:13 PM   
 By:   AMAFilmScoreFan   (Member)

Hello All:

I thought I'd contribute to this thread by mentioning "The Fountain." The film was definitely not for everybody, but those that did connect to it owe, at least in my opinion, a lot to Clint Mansell, Kronos Quartet, and Mogwai for a great score that really contributes to the emotional climax of the film with "Death Is The Road To Awe."

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2013 - 1:41 PM   
 By:   Scott Atkins   (Member)

I'm still not sure how to post a picture in a post.

Maybe someone can tell me?


When you post a message, look to the left hand side. You will see highlighted in blue "special code legend". Hit that and it will tell you how to post a picture from almost any site. This site does require a more hands on approach. Once you learn it, it's a piece of cake.

 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2013 - 2:24 PM   
 By:   losher22   (Member)

Hello All:

I thought I'd contribute to this thread by mentioning "The Fountain." The film was definitely not for everybody, but those that did connect to it owe, at least in my opinion, a lot to Clint Mansell, Kronos Quartet, and Mogwai for a great score that really contributes to the emotional climax of the film with "Death Is The Road To Awe."

I've never inserted an image, nor referenced it within a thread, so I will post a link to the cover below until I can figure out, along with the previous poster, how to insert images.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/3/37/The_Fountain_Soundtrack.jpg


Great mention - I'm a huge fan of The Fountain and actually listened to it a few weeks ago for the first time in a couple years. Fantastic and transcendant stuff!

 
 Posted:   Jan 13, 2013 - 11:14 PM   
 By:   Gary S.   (Member)



A magical score by the great Hugo Friedhofer. Been way too long since I spun this score.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 16, 2013 - 7:07 AM   
 By:   Scott Atkins   (Member)



A magical score by the great Hugo Friedhofer. Been way too long since I spun this score.


I don't have much Hugo Friedhofer but I do have FSM's release of Between Heaven and Hell/ Soldier of Fortune. I must admit that I never heard of Boy on a Dolphin nor was I aware that Intrada had released an album! I probably saw that it was available but it just didn't' register. Mr. Friedhofer seems to also have a lot of uncredited work. It seems like if a production needed help, he was the glue that would bring it together. Perhaps I should start paying more attention to Mr. Friedhofer.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 19, 2013 - 10:08 AM   
 By:   Scott Atkins   (Member)

I have been watching a lot of Hitchcock on Blu-Ray and a recent viewing of Torn Curtain got me interested in revisiting...

Torn Curtain-Composed by Bernard Herrmann- Conducted by Joel McNeely- National Philharmonic Orchestra- Varese Sarabande- 1998



The infamous score which caused the split between Herrmann and Hitchcock. Personally, I think Hitchcock made a mistake dismissing Herrmann on this project. Hitchcock’s previous film Marnie had been meet with critical and commercial failure. Hitchcock started to listen to the wrong people on Torn Curtain and miscast his two lead actors who were super hot at the time. (Newman and Andrews are great stars but not quite right for their roles here. For me, the character of Gromek portrayed by Wolfgang Kieling is worth the price of admission as is the farm house sequence.) He also wanted a more accessible score which could be marketed as a mainstream album and relayed his feelings to Herrmann.. Hitchcock heard a few cues that Herrmann composed for Torn Curtain and pretty much fired him on the spot. He was replaced by John Addison who delivered a hit and miss score for the film. The DVD and Blu-Ray release of the movie presents some of Herrmann’s score with the intended scenes as a special feature. (Sadly, the Blu-Ray presents the scenes in standard definition.) The results are superior to what was finally released. Perhaps one day we will get to see a version of Torn Curtaiin with all the Herrmann music. I think it would improve the impact of the film overall.

Joel McNeely does a nice job with Herrmann’s “monochromatic” score. Highlights are 'Prelude' and 'The Killing'. The film presents the farm house 'killing' sequence without music. Herrmann's cue is a masterpiece. The scene cries out for music and Herrmann's cue is perfect. I'd go as far as to say it would have done for the farm house scene what 'The Murder' cue did for the shower scene in "Psycho". It’s great to have almost everything Herrmann wrote for the film available in some form. The cue “The Killing” was adapted by Elmer Bernstein for use in Scorsese’s 1991 Cape Fear and it’s great that a general audience has heard some of Herrmann’s music composed for the film. Like almost all of Herrmann's work this score is beautiful, sometimes brutal and as fresh as the day it was composed. This soundtrack will always be a bittersweet experience for me. A journey into what could have been...

 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2013 - 6:17 AM   
 By:   Gary S.   (Member)



Here is a Fielding score I haven't listened to in a long time.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2013 - 9:47 AM   
 By:   shadowman   (Member)



Here is a Fielding score I haven't listened to in a long time.


One of my favorite Fielding's, right up there with "Straw Dogs", "The
Mechanic", and "Lawman".

 
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