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 Posted:   May 10, 2013 - 7:13 AM   
 By:   Harrybocai   (Member)

Hi, everyone, I'm a Chinese film music fan.
and I'm now translating James Wierzbicki's Film Music: A History into Chinese.

I open this thread just for listing my questions including the grammar, inner meaning, and proper names during my translation.

Thanks for helping me with the translation in following translate years. smile

-----Question on 5th. Sep-----

The book quote STEPHEN HOLDEN's article How Rock Is Changing Hollywood's Tune.
http://www.nytimes.com/1989/07/16/movies/how-rock-is-changing-hollywood-s-tune.html?pagewanted=all&src=pm

Especially in the late 1960's, when a generation of performers lacking academic musical credentials began invading Hollywood sound studios, the field of movie music became embattled. The soundtracks for 'The Graduate' (1967) with songs by Simon and Garfunkel, and 'Easy Rider' (1969), the first major movie hit with a multi-artist rock compilation, brought the generation gap to Hollywood movie music, just as the films did to the screen.

the last sentence brought the generation gap to Hollywood movie music, just as the films did to the screen.

Can anyone help me explain what's the generation gap between film and music, or film and TV? frown

 
 Posted:   May 10, 2013 - 7:29 AM   
 By:   judy the hutt   (Member)

Hey I bet your English is better than my Chinese (or Mandarin). Good luck on your project. Love your "icon."

Judy in Tucson, AZ

 
 
 Posted:   May 10, 2013 - 11:03 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Good luck with that! I'll gladly provide assistance, if you need some (English is not my first language either, but I think I know it reasonably well).

 
 Posted:   May 10, 2013 - 3:06 PM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

The contract will be signed in resent months.

Ok let's begin: recent is with a 'c', not an 's.'

The word you've used ('resent') is not a word I think you'd want to use in context if you're trying to get ahead in the game. wink

You would say something like: 'The contract signing is a mere formality and will be sewn up within a month or two.' I must admit, I have no idea at all how to say any of that in chinese, but, I think it would serve your purpose in buckets and spades! big grin

 
 Posted:   May 11, 2013 - 7:11 AM   
 By:   Harrybocai   (Member)

The contract will be signed in resent months.

Ok let's begin: recent is with a 'c', not an 's.'

The word you've used ('resent') is not a word I think you'd want to use in context if you're trying to get ahead in the game. wink

You would say something like: 'The contract signing is a mere formality and will be sewn up within a month or two.' I must admit, I have no idea at all how to say any of that in chinese, but, I think it would serve your purpose in buckets and spades! big grin

Thanks for point my expression and spelling mistake out from me, translating English into Chinese seems much easier than communicate with you in English. You can find that all my expression is in a simple way.

BTW, the translation of this book now has completed a half, I'll list the problems soon.

and thanks for your supports, judy the hutt, Thor.

smile

 
 Posted:   Jun 8, 2013 - 7:12 PM   
 By:   Harrybocai   (Member)

On Chapter 3 The Nickelodeon 1905~15

"Just a few months before, a writer for Harper’s Weekly estimated that during the 1906–7 theatrical season some two hundred nickelodeons opened in Manhattan alone."

I have search the definition of theatrical season, it means the season when new plays are produced.

But in this sentence, I think the theatrical season means a period that happened in that time, not a period of producing a play.

But what is the period? Any options of the "theatrical season"?

Thanks

 
 Posted:   Jun 8, 2013 - 8:06 PM   
 By:   Josh   (Member)

Hi Harry,

Perhaps the author uses the "theatrical season" time frame in order to relate the fact that nickelodeons were starting to become (or at least be perceived as) a competitor to live theater venues.

Josh

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 8, 2013 - 8:13 PM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

The "season" for most theater and orchestras (in the northern hemisphere) begins in September (after the summer vacation) and continues into the spring.

 
 Posted:   Jun 8, 2013 - 8:28 PM   
 By:   Harrybocai   (Member)

The "season" for most theater and orchestras (in the northern hemisphere) begins in September (after the summer vacation) and continues into the spring.

Thank you, do you have any source on the historical articles or books to show your explanation?

 
 Posted:   Jun 8, 2013 - 8:31 PM   
 By:   Harrybocai   (Member)

Hi Harry,

Perhaps the author uses the "theatrical season" time frame in order to relate the fact that nickelodeons were starting to become (or at least be perceived as) a competitor to live theater venues.

Josh

You're right. Same with you. smile

 
 Posted:   Jun 9, 2013 - 1:21 AM   
 By:   Josh   (Member)

George Garrott's article "Proposal Would Extend Live Theater On Suncoast" (St. Petersburg Times, February 12, 1956) states, "The theatrical season traditionally runs 40 weeks but of course can always be extended 'by popular demand.'"

http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=888&dat=19560212&id=3RtSAAAAIBAJ&sjid=MXYDAAAAIBAJ&pg=6852,5114882

The 12 off-season weeks are presumably those of the summer months (June-August) which would support Rozsaphile's comment above.

 
 Posted:   Jun 9, 2013 - 2:54 AM   
 By:   Harrybocai   (Member)

George Garrott's article "Proposal Would Extend Live Theater On Suncoast" (St. Petersburg Times, February 12, 1956) states, "The theatrical season traditionally runs 40 weeks but of course can always be extended 'by popular demand.'"

http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=888&dat=19560212&id=3RtSAAAAIBAJ&sjid=MXYDAAAAIBAJ&pg=6852,5114882

The 12 off-season weeks are presumably those of the summer months (June-August) which would support Rozsaphile's comment above.

Thank you for the source smile

 
 Posted:   Jun 11, 2013 - 8:14 AM   
 By:   Harrybocai   (Member)

There is a description of nickelodeon in this book on page 31.

"one story high, twenty-five feet wide and about seventy feet deep"

I think it means the nickelodeon is a one-floor high, twenty-five feet wide building. But how to understand the meaning of "deep"? Is it same as "high"?

Or it means the nickelodeon is a one-floor building with twenty-five feet wide and about seventy feet deep.

Which one is right?

Thanks!

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 11, 2013 - 9:51 AM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

There is a description of nickelodeon in this book on page 31.

"one story high, twenty-five feet wide and about seventy feet deep"

I think it means the nickelodeon is a one-floor high, twenty-five feet wide building. But how to understand the meaning of "deep"? Is it same as "high"?

Or it means the nickelodeon is a one-floor building with twenty-five feet wide and about seventy feet deep.

Which one is right?

Thanks!



Harrybocai.....The nickelodeon is one-floor high (probably about 10-14 feet in those days), 25 feet wide, and 70 feet LONG (from front to back).

As someone has pointed out, the theatrical "season" was about 40 weeks long, with 12 weeks off in the summer, generally because, in those days at the turn-of-the-century, it was too hot for the audiences to sit in the indoor theaters which were, for the most part, not air-conditioned.

The forty weeks on and 12 weeks off schedule also gave performers in live theater, particularly in vaudeville, time to recuperate from their touring season, and often to develop a new act which they'd take on the road in the upcoming season.

 
 Posted:   Jun 12, 2013 - 1:33 AM   
 By:   Harrybocai   (Member)

Harrybocai.....The nickelodeon is one-floor high (probably about 10-14 feet in those days), 25 feet wide, and 70 feet LONG (from front to back).

As someone has pointed out, the theatrical "season" was about 40 weeks long, with 12 weeks off in the summer, generally because, in those days at the turn-of-the-century, it was too hot for the audiences to sit in the indoor theaters which were, for the most part, not air-conditioned.

The forty weeks on and 12 weeks off schedule also gave performers in live theater, particularly in vaudeville, time to recuperate from their touring season, and often to develop a new act which they'd take on the road in the upcoming season.


Hi manderley.
Thanks or your explanation.
I don't have much experience about the American culture and custom, I would appreciate your comments.

Thanks again!

 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2013 - 8:54 AM   
 By:   Harrybocai   (Member)

I met a problem of understanding of this sentence:

on Page 38

"In any case, the cue sheet for this first filmic rendition of Mary Shelley’s horror story remains remarkable for its mix of iconographic compositions with music— a “moderato” and several segments identified only as “agitato”—of a generic sort."

I don't know whether is is legal to post a full article here to help you to understand with the context.

This a summary of the cue sheet of Edison's Frankenstein, so is there another expression of "its mix of iconographic compositions with music— a “moderato” and several segments identified only as “agitato”—of a generic sort."?

Thanks!

 
 Posted:   Jun 20, 2013 - 4:29 PM   
 By:   Harrybocai   (Member)

Anyone help? frown

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 20, 2013 - 5:10 PM   
 By:   jskoda   (Member)

I met a problem of understanding of this sentence:

on Page 38

"In any case, the cue sheet for this ?rst ?lmic rendition of Mary Shelley’s horror story remains remarkable for its mix of iconographic compositions with music— a “moderato” and several segments identified only as “agitato”—of a generic sort."


These are just guesses, but--

?rst ?lmic = first filmic

Maybe by "iconographic compositions" it means "iconic images"

And if you reorder things a bit, it could be:

"In any case, this first filmic rendition of Mary Shelley’s horror story remains remarkable for its mix of iconic images with generic music— the cue sheet includes a “moderato” and several segments identified only as “agitato.”

 
 Posted:   Jun 20, 2013 - 6:02 PM   
 By:   Harrybocai   (Member)

These are just guesses, but--

?rst ?lmic = first filmic

Maybe by "iconographic compositions" it means "iconic images"

And if you reorder things a bit, it could be:

"In any case, this first filmic rendition of Mary Shelley’s horror story remains remarkable for its mix of iconic images with generic music— the cue sheet includes a “moderato” and several segments identified only as “agitato.”


Hi jskoda.

Thanks you for your explanation, and it's "first filmic", this is a problem caused by text encoding.

The main problem is focus on "iconographic compositions" and the position of "of a generic sort", now I can understand what does the author want to say.

Thank you so much! smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 20, 2013 - 8:00 PM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)

The original is obscure. (You can see it via Google Books -- page 38.) The author seems to draw a contrast between "iconographic compositions" and "generic" music. My guess is that the former means selections by known composers and the latter means anonymous bits. Ideally you should check this with the author, for his wording is simply not clear.

 
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