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 Posted:   Feb 1, 2008 - 12:12 PM   
 By:   Gordon Reeves   (Member)

In Da Beginning (the 40s), there was



During the 50s, there was William Gaines’ unconventional EC Comics



Then, during the truly radical 60s, Three Men revolutionized comics forever:











And the world has never been the same again.



Imperius Rex! ...

 
 Posted:   Feb 1, 2008 - 2:16 PM   
 By:   MikeJ   (Member)

It's not too late to get The Man to write dialogue for our Message Board's very own ODINSON....

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 1, 2008 - 6:21 PM   
 By:   JSWalsh   (Member)

The thing about Marvel comics is that they did precisely what I was talking about in the other thread--brought the mythic down to earth. Marvel is the comic book equivalent of Richard Matheson, who took horror away from the gothic castle and took it to the streets of modern USA.

Marvel had characaters that seemed "regular" and thus the encounters with villains and the galactic powers had an edge of believability that DC comics just didn't have at the time.

 
 Posted:   Feb 1, 2008 - 8:17 PM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)

Very true. I did a term paper on American comic books when I was a junior in High School illustrating the history of the art form leading up to the 70's and had a ball writing it. John summed it up.

I got 100% for the paper! Exempted me from finals, too...

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 1, 2008 - 8:49 PM   
 By:   JSWalsh   (Member)

Hmmm....the only time I got out of finals was when I signed my name to the sheet and turned it in without answering the questions.... Didn't QUITE work out as yours did...

 
 Posted:   Feb 2, 2008 - 6:35 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I always preferred the DC War Comics of Bob Kanigher and Joe Kubert, along with other great artists like Russ Heath, John Severin, and George Evans. During the Sixties and early 1970s, they quietly churned out some amazing, realistic-looking work that conveyed the horrors of war.

As for Kirby and the like, I've admired Jack Kirby for his "High Concept" imagery, with all of those galaxy-sized computers and spaceships and all of the alien races that he and Stan created.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 2, 2008 - 12:25 PM   
 By:   Gordon Reeves   (Member)

If Stan's the Heart, Jack



IS the Soul and Spirit of Marvel,



truly the Michelangelo of Manga ...

 
 Posted:   Feb 2, 2008 - 12:58 PM   
 By:   Stefan Miklos   (Member)

If Stan's the Heart, Jack
IS the Soul and Spirit of Marvel,





The success of these comic books come from the characters' approach: the writers focuses on the existential questions and stamp them with the sociology of the time which give a realism and a human thickness. In the 1960's, Marvel was almost New Wave but still the first drawings were a bit late 1950's, meaning elegant and straight.
On TV, the same universe was explored in "The Outer Limits".

 
 Posted:   Feb 2, 2008 - 1:31 PM   
 By:   nuts_score   (Member)

Make mine Marvel (well, old school Marvel that is)!

Neo, before I finally registered for FSM I stalked about these parts everyday after posting at MovieMusic.com. You're truly one of the funniest users I've ever read about any message board. Keep up the funny pictures!


Oh, and, long live King Kirby!

 
 Posted:   Feb 2, 2008 - 1:34 PM   
 By:   nuts_score   (Member)

Also, Will Eisner and Jerry Siegel and Joe Schuster are the true original heroes of the comic book medium. Jack Kirby has rightfully joined their ranks as Uber-mensch, but Stan Lee has rightfully dropped from his high throne due to his recent antics and - from what it seems - extreme creative dementia.

I don't even know why he still has fans.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 2, 2008 - 2:16 PM   
 By:   MikeP   (Member)

Kirby still rules them all. His wild imagination, when he was allowed to roam free, was stunningly bizarre and completely infectious.

Although I don't have the new hardback Omnibus reprints of Kirby's New Gods, I have the trade paperback reprints, and the hardback IMMORTALS omnibus, and they're great reading! Zany, spacy, corny and thrilling. I can still recall buying these from the drug store comic rack back in the 70's !

I only wish DC would produce some thick black & white reprints of his Kamandi series ( instead of the pricey hardbacks).

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 2, 2008 - 3:06 PM   
 By:   Bob Oblong   (Member)

All of these guys, I love...

I've got the KAMANDI and FOURTH WORLD reprints DC has been issuing of late. (DC is abandoning its' pricey "Archives" line, leaving the second half of Kirby's run unreprinted. Bummer, eh?)

But my favorite comic ever is Will Eisner's "The Spirit", and it's not-so-coincidentally drawn by my favorite artist ever. I've got all of the Archives to date (only one more volume to go!), and I generally read 'em from cover-to-cover the day I get them. IMHO, comics just don't come any better. (I live in fear of Frank Miller's movie version...if any comic needed a light touch, it's THE SPIRIT. He's not the right guy for the project.)

My favorite Jack Kirby art, though, isn't on CAPTAIN AMERICA or FANTASTIC FOUR, but THE MIGHTY THOR. Damn, that's good stuff. (I know the Vince Colletta inking has a bad rep, but I like it...a lot!)

Ditko's masterpiece...his run on THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN. As far as Spidey artists go, no one can touch him.

I'm not big on modern comics, but I really love both ASTRO CITY and lament the loss of Alan Moore's TOM STRONG.

 
 Posted:   Feb 2, 2008 - 10:42 PM   
 By:   nuts_score   (Member)

My favorite Kirby artwork is his work on Doctor Strange. This was a peiod when he really let his imagination do its thing. Same said for his Thor stuff, as well.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 3, 2008 - 4:46 AM   
 By:   MikeP   (Member)

Bob, I love The Spirit too, although I didn't get into that until the Warren ( wasn't it Warren) black & white magazine in the 70's.

Yep, Miller is 100% WRONG for the movie, his Sin City was just plain awful, and yep he's just going to mess this up I know.

The only modern stuff I follow now is Frank Cho's Liberty Meadows ( which it seems is NEVER gonna come back!) although I'll pick up a trade like Kingdom Come, Marvels, Batman The Long Halloween, so I can read a complete story in one volume.

 
 Posted:   Feb 3, 2008 - 6:07 AM   
 By:   Charles Thaxton   (Member)

I loved Kirby's pre-superhero "monster" days (FIN FANG FOOM!!) I don't recall him working much on DR.STRANGE though..(that was Steve Ditko in the beginning)
I used to have to ride my bike all over my hometown to every store that carried Marvel because not every store stocked every title. It took days to get caught up.(back in the 60s)
I couldn't wait to see his creation Galactus portrayed in the FF/Surfer movie....but alas Tim Story chickened out.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 3, 2008 - 7:18 AM   
 By:   Gordon Reeves   (Member)





We bow to no one in our eternal admiration for this The Trinity of Olympians (and some enterprising soul needs to start a Thread of Salute for them on their own):



(Another historical tidbit: Jack actually worked in Mr. Eisner's studio when he was first starting out).



By the bye, has anyone checked this one below out yet?





As for your kourageously kind kompliment, NutSew, gee, you've almost rendered us inna state that's sacrilege for a syllable-spinner: speechless (well, we said almost)! embarrassment



Gad, it's turrrible what some folks'll dew to get attention, ain't it?!!! ... wink

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 3, 2008 - 7:36 AM   
 By:   Gordon Reeves   (Member)

Actually, we plan to delve into that Creative Dementia aspect anon



(as it's indisputably responsible for the residually unresolved conflicts and life-long animosity Ditko has towards him (and Jack - although the latter had generally patched things up and made peace before The King's death).

Tis no wonder someone once dubbed Smiley "The Ego That Walks Like a Man".



Still, whatever diminishing (and sadly embarrassing) luster his later life has attracted, we daresay doesn't definitively alter his rightful achievements during The Marvel Age (for which a significant amount goes to the encouragement his wife Joan conclusively contributed to giving him the courage to re-write the "rules") ...

 
 Posted:   Feb 3, 2008 - 5:09 PM   
 By:   nuts_score   (Member)

As for your kourageously kind kompliment, NutSew, gee, you've almost rendered us inna state that's sacrilege for a syllable-spinner: speechless (well, we said almost)! embarrassment



Gad, it's turrrible what some folks'll dew to get attention, ain't it?!!! ... wink


Hooray! I found myself in a neotrinity post!

 
 Posted:   Feb 3, 2008 - 5:12 PM   
 By:   nuts_score   (Member)

I loved Kirby's pre-superhero "monster" days (FIN FANG FOOM!!) I don't recall him working much on DR.STRANGE though..(that was Steve Ditko in the beginning)
I used to have to ride my bike all over my hometown to every store that carried Marvel because not every store stocked every title. It took days to get caught up.(back in the 60s)
I couldn't wait to see his creation Galactus portrayed in the FF/Surfer movie....but alas Tim Story chickened out.


Whoops, my mistake. I was caught up in Ditko's MARVEL-ous Cosmic depiction of Eternity to see the whole truth. Steve Ditko is also a king in his own right. Doctor Strange has always been my favorite Marvel hero, even if he is the ultimate deus ex machina.

 
 Posted:   Feb 3, 2008 - 6:16 PM   
 By:   Charles Thaxton   (Member)

I liked Gene Colan's DR. STRANGE when the Doctor had the black mask....it was kinda cool. STRANGE would make a great theatrical movie. The 70s tv film wasn't bad except for the final Flash Gordon style costume. They depicted the other dimensions pretty well on a limited budget.

 
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