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 Posted:   Jan 20, 2013 - 10:17 AM   
 By:   Christopher Kinsinger   (Member)

A dear friend of mine and I were talking about our favorite Christmas movies. As we listed old favorites, such as The Bishop's Wife, It's A Wonderful Life, Holiday Inn, White Christmas, and the like, she named one I had never before heard of: Christmas In Connecticut.
She couldn't believe I had never seen or heard of this one, as it's one of her very favorites. So, she invited me to her home for "Dinner & A Movie". After a great meal, we enjoyed the film together.

Christmas In Connecticut (1945), Starring Barbara Stanwyck, Dennis Morgan, Sydney Greenstreet, Reginald Gardiner, S.Z. Sakall & Una O'Connor.

I thoroughly enjoyed the film, especially since I'd never before seen Barbara Stanwyck in a comedy.

There's no such thing as "old" movies, just wonderful films that we haven't seen yet! This movie may have been made in 1945...but it's new to me!
What old classic movie did you just discover for the first time?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2013 - 7:28 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

To CHRIS- I can't believe you never saw that one. it really is not that obscure.A few months ago i caught up with a film that i never saw completely and i loved it. Must see it again THE MAN WHO COULD WORK MIRACLES-36-wonderful film, somehow , one of the few sense of wonder films i have not seen from the 30's. There were not as many sense of wonder films back then as in later decades.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2013 - 8:25 PM   
 By:   Christopher Kinsinger   (Member)

Thanks, dan. I'll put that one on my list of "must see" films, since I've never even heard of it.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2013 - 8:47 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

LOOK BACK IN ANGER 1959
Some of these kitchen sink films aren't as good after a long period of time but this thing is purportedly the granddaddy of them all and I can see why. British films are not known for their emotional content but this is awash with them. Really nice to see where Tony Richardson got his rep before TOM JONES (and besides THE ENTERTAINER).

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2013 - 8:52 PM   
 By:   Christopher Kinsinger   (Member)

Thanks, Morricone. I saw Look Back In Anger a very, very long time ago, and it is worth another visit. I appreciate you bringing it to my attention!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2013 - 8:53 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

THE MAN WHO COULD WORK MIRACLES-1936- RALPH RICHARDSON. ROLAND YOUNG. GEORGE SANDERS, GEORGE ZUCCO.LEONARD MALTIN gives the film 3 and a half stars. You should like it. It's thought provoking and anything thought provoking is fine with me.

 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2013 - 9:04 PM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

My continued viewing of library copies of Criterion releases has allowed me to finally get around to seeing The Fallen Idol, Faces, Rossellini's Il Generale della Rovere and Blaise Pascal, and two of Carlos Saura's flamenco films Blood Wedding and El amor brujo.

Also during the last couple of months I've watched Desperate Characters, The Chase (the 1966 Arthur Penn film) and Sling Blade for the first time.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2013 - 9:18 PM   
 By:   philiperic   (Member)

A dear friend of mine and I were talking about our favorite Christmas movies. As we listed old favorites, such as The Bishop's Wife, It's A Wonderful Life, Holiday Inn, White Christmas, and the like, she named one I had never before heard of: Christmas In Connecticut.
She couldn't believe I had never seen or heard of this one, as it's one of her very favorites. So, she invited me to her home for "Dinner & A Movie". After a great meal, we enjoyed the film together.

Christmas In Connecticut (1945), Starring Barbara Stanwyck, Dennis Morgan, Sydney Greenstreet, Reginald Gardiner, S.Z. Sakall & Una O'Connor.

I thoroughly enjoyed the film, especially since I'd never before seen Barbara Stanwyck in a comedy.

There's no such thing as "old" movies, just wonderful films that we haven't seen yet! This movie may have been made in 1945...but it's new to me!
What old classic movie did you just discover for the first time?



An old movie I'd never seen but just watched recently and really enjoyed was the forgotten CHANDU THE MAGICIAN (1932)-- it is on the Fox Horror Classics Vol 2 -- It stars Edmund Lowe in the title role but the stellar performance is by Bela Lugosi as the evil Roxor set on destroying Mankind -- it also has incredible set design and direction by William Cameron Menzies . Later Lugosi played Chandu in a low budget serial entitled THE RETURN OF CHANDU.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2013 - 10:39 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

TO MARK R YOUNG- I really enjoyed DESPERATE CHARACTERS-71-saw it years ago, solid drama, depressing indeed, but well done and true to life.

 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2013 - 11:14 PM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

TO MARK R YOUNG- I really enjoyed DESPERATE CHARACTERS-71-saw it years ago, solid drama, depressing indeed, but well done and true to life.

Yes, I quite liked it. And it was a true new discovery, as I knew virtually nothing about it before last month depite me being a 1970s cinema junkie!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2013 - 11:26 PM   
 By:   Michael24   (Member)

Back in October, I saw I Married a Witch on TCM. While it had a few weak points here and there, I thought it was a cute little movie, and Veronica Lake was stunningly-beautiful.

I've also never seen Wait Until Dark, but I have it on my DVR (again, courtesy of TCM) and plan to watch it very soon.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 21, 2013 - 12:44 AM   
 By:   riotengine   (Member)

Last year I discovered the Anthony Mann film noir, Border Incident, which starred Ricardo Montalban as an undercover border cop. Pretty hard-edged for its time with some gorgeous b&w cinematography by John Alton. Some great character work in it by Howard Da Silva, Arnold Moss, Charles McGraw, and Alfonso Bedoya.

I just picked up a copy for my Dad as a late birthday present.

Greg Espinoza

P.S. I just viewed Hell to Eternity, with Jeffrey Hunter and David Janssen. Liked it quite a bit.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 21, 2013 - 2:06 AM   
 By:   Joe E.   (Member)

I'm not sure if it truly counts as a "discovery," since of course I've heard plenty about the movie and had long had an interest in it even without having seen it, but just about three months ago I finally got to see Lawrence of Arabia - theatrically, the way it was meant to be seen. It's one of those rare movies with an extraordinary reputation that manages to live up to it and then some - just magnificent.

 
 Posted:   Jan 21, 2013 - 3:42 AM   
 By:   Ray Faiola   (Member)

THE NORTH STAR (Goldwyn / 1943). I picked up a beautiful 16mm print of the original release version (it was reissued hacked to ribbons as ARMORED ATTACK). About a Ukrainian village that is taken over by Nazis. Olive Films is slated to release this but I have no idea if Paramount has the uncut version (the NTA release was the cut reissue and Paramount's custodianship is by virtue of their NTA purchase).

Cast includes Farley Granger, Anne Baxter, Walter Huston, Walter Brennan, Erich Von Stroheim, Ann Harding, Ruth Nelson and the wonderful Martin Kosleck. Music by Aaron Copland and Direction by Lewis Milestone.

I had never seen the film due to either edited versions or bad dupes having been shown.

 
 Posted:   Jan 21, 2013 - 5:10 AM   
 By:   PhiladelphiaSon   (Member)

I know the thread isn't about "I can't believe you never saw (or heard ) of that movie, Chris"; but, I can't believe you never saw it! The one that I actually re-discovered (I saw it as a kid), is REMEMBER THE NIGHT, which also has a Christmas theme, and also stars Barbara Stanwyck.

 
 Posted:   Jan 21, 2013 - 8:18 AM   
 By:   jackfu   (Member)

Laura (1944). I'm probably the only one on this board over 50 who had never seen it before. It is awesome! Great characters and choice of actors as well.
Interesting to note how much Sharky's Machine borrowed from this film.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 21, 2013 - 10:10 AM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

.....Last year I discovered the Anthony Mann film noir, Border Crossing, which starred Ricardo Montalban as an undercover border cop. Pretty hard-edged for its time with some gorgeous b&w cinematography by John Alton. Some great character work in it by Howard Da Silva, Arnold Moss, Charles McGraw, and Alfonso Bedoya.

I just picked up a copy for my Dad as a late birthday present.

Greg Espinoza.....



Greg....I believe you are referring to BORDER INCIDENT, not BORDER "CROSSING" but your comments are entirely correct. BORDER INCIDENT is a powerful, hard-edged film in the vein of the other Dore Schary initiated projects at MGM during his tenure.

It is a superbly-made black-and-white "B" picture that seems incredibly relevant now---even 62 years after its original release.

It was one of those non-famous MGM films featured in a moment in the MGM historical documentary, MGM: WHEN THE LION ROARS from 1992, which is where I first saw it, though I'd heard about it many years before.

 
 Posted:   Jan 21, 2013 - 10:20 AM   
 By:   Nyborg   (Member)

caught Odds Against Tomorrow on netflix recently and was blown away by it. I had an idea Robert Wise was a good director but combined with the excellent script here he turns out one powerful scene after another. the anti-racist final line is kind of hokey, or at least it hasn't aged well, and it's a shame, but it doesn't take away from the script's intent, and the performances by Robert Ryan and Harry Belafonte as the two distrusting bank robbers are really great.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 21, 2013 - 12:14 PM   
 By:   riotengine   (Member)

.....Last year I discovered the Anthony Mann film noir, Border Incident, which starred Ricardo Montalban as an undercover border cop. Pretty hard-edged for its time with some gorgeous b&w cinematography by John Alton. Some great character work in it by Howard Da Silva, Arnold Moss, Charles McGraw, and Alfonso Bedoya.

I just picked up a copy for my Dad as a late birthday present.

Greg....I believe you are referring to BORDER INCIDENT, not BORDER "CROSSING" but your comments are entirely correct. BORDER INCIDENT is a powerful, hard-edged film in the vein of the other Dore Schary initiated projects at MGM during his tenure.

It is a superbly-made black-and-white "B" picture that seems incredibly relevant now---even 62 years after its original release.

It was one of those non-famous MGM films featured in a moment in the MGM historical documentary, MGM: WHEN THE LION ROARS from 1992, which is where I first saw it, though I'd heard about it many years before.


Doh! You are correct, Mandeley. I knew it was Border Incident, but I had a mental brownout and wrote Border Crossing, LOL. Another thing I like about it was the casting of Montalban, that made it more authentic and more potent by his actually being hispanic. I thought it was very daring for the time for a major studio film.

Greg Espinoza

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 21, 2013 - 12:54 PM   
 By:   eriknelson   (Member)

.....Last year I discovered the Anthony Mann film noir, Border Incident, which starred Ricardo Montalban as an undercover border cop. Pretty hard-edged for its time with some gorgeous b&w cinematography by John Alton. Some great character work in it by Howard Da Silva, Arnold Moss, Charles McGraw, and Alfonso Bedoya.

I just picked up a copy for my Dad as a late birthday present.

Greg....I believe you are referring to BORDER INCIDENT, not BORDER "CROSSING" but your comments are entirely correct. BORDER INCIDENT is a powerful, hard-edged film in the vein of the other Dore Schary initiated projects at MGM during his tenure.

It is a superbly-made black-and-white "B" picture that seems incredibly relevant now---even 62 years after its original release.

It was one of those non-famous MGM films featured in a moment in the MGM historical documentary, MGM: WHEN THE LION ROARS from 1992, which is where I first saw it, though I'd heard about it many years before.


Doh! You are correct, Mandeley. I knew it was Border Incident, but I had a mental brownout and wrote Border Crossing, LOL. Another thing I like about it was the casting of Montalban, that made it more authentic and more potent by his actually being hispanic. I thought it was very daring for the time for a major studio film.

Greg Espinoza


And this film also has a good Andre Previn score.

 
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