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 Posted:   Jun 29, 2014 - 2:50 PM   
 By:   Joe E.   (Member)


All 3 of these are posted thanks. Care to have a look?

http://www.pinterest.com/arthurgrant9883/the-community-chest-most-wanted-by-fans-on-dvd-or-/


Great, thanks (and good call on finding a different image from that "unmentionable" DVD cover for Grand).

 
 Posted:   Jun 29, 2014 - 6:40 PM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

I always liked a movie called "Song Without End" about a famous pianist and the woman who loved him -- it has some wonderful Liszt. To my knowledge never released before.

Available on a lousy pan-and-scan DVD (but previously screenable at Netflix in widescreen), "The Promise" with Kathleen Quinlan and Stephen Collins.

And my Old Faithfuls that I keep mentioning:

"Sheila Levine Is Dead And Living In New York City" starring Jeannie Berlin and Roy Scheider, directed by Sydney J. Furie. Never available in ANY format.

"Something For Everyone," starring Angela Lansbury and Michael York, directed by Harold Prince. Only available on VHS.

Abel Gance's classic silent "Napoleon," shown decades later in elaborate presentations with a soundtrack composed and conducted live by Carmine Coppola -- cable used to show it, but I've never seen it available in any home video format.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 29, 2014 - 11:51 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

I always liked a movie called "Song Without End" about a famous pianist and the woman who loved him -- it has some wonderful Liszt. To my knowledge never released before.



SONG WITHOUT END was released as a Sony made-on-demand DVD in 2011.

http://www.amazon.com/Song-Without-End-Ivan-Desny/dp/B004CZZZJA/ref=sr_1_1?s=movies-tv&ie=UTF8&qid=1404110367&sr=1-1&keywords=song+without+end

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 30, 2014 - 12:08 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Abel Gance's classic silent "Napoleon," shown decades later in elaborate presentations with a soundtrack composed and conducted live by Carmine Coppola -- cable used to show it, but I've never seen it available in any home video format.


NAPOLEON was released in the U.S. on laserdisc by MCA way back in 1986, and on VHS in 1992. And I've heard of both a Region 2 DVD and a Region 4 (Australia) DVD that Arthur should be able to fill us in on.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 30, 2014 - 3:47 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

There's "A Gathering Of Eagles" which I recall was seen in widescreen on T.C.M. in 2006, but has yet to see a D.V.D. or Blu Ray release.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2014 - 3:27 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

In 1968, husband-and-wife writing team Reneé Taylor and Joseph Bologna wrote the Broadway hit comedy “Lovers and Other Strangers.” Taylor starred in that play, which the team then adapted for the screen. Unhappy with the changes made by the filmmakers, however, they left the project. When the screenplay was nominated for an Academy Award, the couple shared credit with their replacement, David Z. Goodman. They then co-wrote the semi-autobiographical screenplay for MADE FOR EACH OTHER, and after receiving encouragement from their friend, writer-director Elaine May, determined to play the lead roles themselves.

Several studios expressed interest in the script but did not want to cast Taylor and Bologna. Waiting for a studio to accept them as the stars had the secondary effect of raising the price of the script. Ultimately, in 1971, Wylde Films, a Twentieth Century-Fox subsidiary that had previously produced television commercials, agreed to bankroll the film, its first production. Elaine May was originally set to direct the film, but had to leave due to prior commitments. Her replacement, Robert Bean, had previously directed Taylor in “2,” a short film written by Taylor and Bologna, which played several theatrical engagements in 1967.

The studio insisted on screen tests of Taylor and Bologna before casting them. Bologna, who earlier had directed short films and acted on stage, made his feature film debut in MADE FOR EACH OTHER. The couple had acted together before only once, when Bologna joined the stage cast of “Lovers and Other Strangers” three weeks before the end of its Broadway run. The film was shot on a budget of $865,000 on location throughout New York City, with interiors shot at the F&B/Ceco Studios in Manhattan.

When the film opened on 15 December 1971, reviews were generally laudatory, with Taylor singled out for praise. The Newsweek review stated that “she gives the sort of performance for which Oscars are handed out.” Pauline Kael called the film “the most satisfying comedy of the year.” MADE FOR EACH OTHER was listed on the 1971 Ten Best lists of New York magazine and The Washington Post. Taylor asserted in a 1985 Los Angeles Daily News article that Woody Allen named the film as his favorite. She stated, “When he did ANNIE HALL, he told us, ‘This is my MADE FOR EACH OTHER.’”

Even though it was released at 107 minutes, lengthy for a comedy, the film was reportedly cut before its release. In 1985, Taylor and Bologna oversaw a restoration of MADE FOR EACH OTHER, with twenty minutes of previously unviewed footage added. That version opened on 3 May 1985 in Los Angeles. But in the ensuing 30 years, neither the original version nor the restored one has had a video release on any format. Years ago, the film turned up on the American Movie Classics channel, when AMC still showed “movie classics.”




 
 
 Posted:   Jul 2, 2014 - 4:55 PM   
 By:   henry   (Member)

You can almost cross off 1941, DUEL and THE SUGARLAND EXPRESS!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 28, 2014 - 7:50 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Following the release of their 1970 campus revolution film THE STRAWBERRY STATEMENT, producers Irwin Winkler and Robert Chartoff, writer Israel Horovitz, and director Stuart Hagmann began a second collaboration. As with the first film, their second was also based upon material that had originally been published in New York magazine. In this case, it was Gail Sheehy’s 1968 study of New York City’s Lower East Side drug subculture, published serially under the title “Speed Is of the Essence.” Under that title, filming began in early October 1970 in New York City and concluded in early December. The film starred Michael Sarrazin and Jacqueline Bisset as a couple involved with amphetamines.

Months later, M-G-M, unhappy with the finished film, hired director John Avildsen (JOE, CRY UNCLE) for two weeks to shoot additional footage in Manhattan. The newly shot scenes, none of which were written by Horovitz, were added to the film, which was then re-edited. During the re-editing, all scenes involving the parents of Bisset’s character, who were portrayed by actors Geraldine Fitzgerald and George Rose, were eliminated. In addition, the original score by Georges Delerue was replaced with one by Fred Karlin. Only Hagmann and Horovitz received onscreen credit as director and writer.

The revised film, now titled BELIEVE IN ME, opened in New York on 8 December 1971. Judith Crist’s reaction to the film was typical: “the people who ruined THE STRAWBERRY STATEMENT” had done the same to BELIEVE IN ME, turning it into “a sloppy story” about which “you couldn’t care less.” A more sympathetic response came from Roger Greenspun of The New York Times, who reasoned that “when allowed some emotional range, Stuart Hagmann directs a rather decent movie.” Variety’s “Whit” was the most positive, arguing that “the subject has been handled realistically,” with a script by Horovitz that “is hard-hitting both in narrative and dialogue and its story is compact in building to an inevitable climax.” Hagmann’s direction, he asserted, “employs no artful devices and does not sensationalize his action; his principals’ behavior is for the most part honestly delineated.”

The film was not a success, and quickly disappeared from the box office. The film has never been released on any home video format, and when the American Film Institute sought out a copy of the film to view for its cataloging project, no print could be found.

 
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