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 Posted:   Aug 27, 2014 - 2:26 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

would like to see original THIN RED LINE

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 27, 2014 - 3:48 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

would like to see original THIN RED LINE

If you read one of my replies, "The Thin Red Line" was released on Scimitar Home Video in a pan and scan version on D.V.D.; however, a widescreen release on Blu Ray is more welcome.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 28, 2014 - 1:28 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

would like to see original THIN RED LINE

If you read one of my replies, "The Thin Red Line" was released on Scimitar Home Video in a pan and scan version on D.V.D.; however, a widescreen release on Blu Ray is more welcome.



James Jones’ novel The Thin Red Line was published in 1962. Jones had already had two novels made into films: From Here To Eternity, published in 1951, was filmed by Fred Zinnemann in 1953, and Some Came Running, published in 1957, was filmed by Vincente Minnelli in 1959. In addition to major directors, both films had all-star casts and were quite successful. FROM HERE TO ETERNITY won eight Academy Awards, including Best Picture, and SOME CAME RUNNING was nominated for five Oscars. But the film version of THE THIN RED LINE was conceived on a smaller scale, and its achievements were also less.

For one thing, while the earlier films had the backing of major studios (Columbia and MGM), THE THIN RED LINE was an independent production undertaken by Security Pictures. To be sure, Security Pictures was not unversed in adapting novels to the screen. Its best-known prior production, 1958’s GOD’S LITTLE ACRE, had been adapted from Erskine Caldwell’s 1933 novel. And Security had also produced war films before, with Anthony Mann’s MEN IN WAR (1957). THE THIN RED LINE’s producer, Sidney Harmon, had produced both of those earlier films, and four more for Security since 1953.

The screenplay for THE THIN RED LINE was written by Bernard Gordon. In the early 1950s, Gordon had been subpoenaed to testify before the House Un-American Activities Committee. He was never actually called, but an acquaintance named him before the Committee, and he was fired from a studio and blacklisted. During the 1950s, Gordon wrote such films as EARTH VS. FLYING SAUCERS and HELLCATS OF THE NAVY under a pseudonym. He had written Security’s most recent picture, 1963’s THE DAY OF THE TRIFFIDS, even though producer Philip Yordan had received official credit. Gordon was finally able to come out of the shadows later in 1963 and receive onscreen credit for his writing on 55 DAYS AT PEKING and CRY OF BATTLE.

Directing THE THIN RED LINE was Andrew Marton. A Hungarian émigré, Marton had been directing small films since 1929. Growing up in the Tyrolean Alps, he had developed a fondness for spectacular mountain scenery and skiing. This led to his being hired by MGM in 1940 to direct the ski sequences for Greta Garbo's TWO-FACED WOMAN (1941). MGM put Marton under contract in 1946. He replaced Compton Bennett as director of KING SOLOMON’S MINES (1950), after Bennett became ill. Subsequently, Marton directed adventure films like THE WILD NORTH (1952) and STORM OVER TIBET (1952). His chief claim to fame, however, was as second unit director in charge of the chariot race for William Wyler in BEN-HUR (1959). Marton had recently had some war film experience, having directed the outdoor sequences involving American actors in 1962’s THE LONGEST DAY.

Unlike the all-star casts of the prior films that were based upon Jones’ novels, THE THIN RED LINE starred the lesser-known Keir Dullea, Jack Warden, and James Philbrook. At the time, Dullea was a hot young television actor, with his breakout feature film being 1962’s independent production DAVID AND LISA. Veteran Jack Warden had been acting since the early 1950s, and had actually appeared in FROM HERE TO ETERNITY, as well as in other war films such as THE FROGMEN (1951), DARBY’S RANGERS, and RUN SILENT, RUN DEEP (both 1958). And he had been praised for his dramatic turn in Sidney Lumet’s 12 ANGRY MEN. Starting in television in 1957, James Philbrook had some bit parts in several late 1950s films. He had a better role in WOMAN OBSESSED (1959) and had most recently starred in a 1962 Columbia B-western, THE WILD WESTERNERS.

THE THIN RED LINE, based loosely on James Jones' own experiences during the Battle of Guadalcanal in World War II, follows the fortunes of Private Doll, who is on Guadalcanal fending off the Japanese. In addition, Doll must deal with a sadistic battle-scarred sergeant with whom he gets into a feud. The picture was shot in Spain, in black-and-white CinemaScope. The film was scored by Malcolm Arnold, but none of his music has ever been released or re-recorded. In fact, Soundtrack Collector does not even list the film among Arnold’s credits. Allied Artists signed on to distribute the film, and the 99-minute THE THIN RED LINE opened in Los Angeles on 13 May 1964.

Reviews were mixed. Looking at the film like a standard war action movie, Variety felt that “Aficionados of action-packed war films will favor the combat-centered approach of THE THIN RED LINE.” The reviewer felt that “Dullea and Warden are colorful antagonists, the former’s intensity contrasting sharply with the latter’s easy-going air.” But critics who were looking for more of Jones’ antiwar message to come through, like the one from The New York Times, declared the film to be “A real disappointment . . . mainly due to the adaptation and the direction. Bernard Gordon’s obvious and overwritten script, in trying to compress too much and too briefly and too faithfully, plays like a comic strip version of the original. Under the sincere but inadequate piloting of Andrew Marton, Jack Warden and Ray Daley are unable to explore the possibilities of two key roles. . . . But young Dullea excels.” But Boxoffice magazine felt that the film had it all, declaring it to be “A powerful , explosive and action-packed World War II drama.” The reviewer also felt that the screenplay “gives it a documentary flavor and stresses realism and the horror of the conflict rather than the personal story . . . A stirring picture which points up the futility of war.” Boxoffice added that “Dullea is outstanding” while the other cast members “contribute first rate acting support. Well directed by Andrew Marton, who handles the battle sequences splendidly.” The film also got a highly laudatory review from Film Daily, a favorable review from Parents Magazine and a mixed notice from the Hollywood Reporter.

Modern takes on the film are similarly mixed. In a 3-star review, Leonard Maltin calls the film a “gritty adaptation.” But The Motion Picture Guide, in a 2½ star notice, first found that “Marton’s direction handles the material well, pumping the needed energy into battle sequences that accurately capture the mayhem and brutality of war.” But the Guide also felt that “The film falters, though, in trying to do too much in too short of a running time. In adapting Jones’ novel for the screen, whole scenes from the book have been neatly compacted, which causes occasional confusion. Motivations are often just touched on without any probing into the psychology of men at war. The result is a good, though not entirely satisfactory, account of two men’s journey through hell.”

While Jones’ novel had sold over a million copies, the picture was grossing barely above average. And it quickly faded away. In a 1999 interview, James Jones’ daughter Kaylie said that there are reasons for the film’s low visibility: "It's not a good film,” she declared. “[It] doesn't know what it is. It was made in the early '60s. There was no such thing as an 'antiwar' film. It was trying to make a heroic war film from a novel that says war is terrible. It was a low-budget movie that was filmed in Spain, so it looks nothing like the terrain.”



THE THIN RED LINE was remade by Terence Malick in 1998, who in his 170-minute film could do better justice to Jones’ novel. Even so, Malick’s film covers only the first half of the book, while Marton’s attempts to encompass the whole novel. Malick’s film prompted the DVD release of the original, which was issued by Simitar Entertainment a month before Malick’s version opened. Unfortunately, the video presents the CinemaScope film in a pan-and-scan transfer.



With rare exceptions, Security Pictures held the sole copyright on all of the films that they produced. Thus, the original distributors (or their successors) are not able to release the films onto video. The Security films that were distributed by Allied Artists (AA), such as THE THIN RED LINE and THE DAY OF THE TRIFFIDS, are not available to the current AA owner, Warner Bros., to issue on DVD. I’m not sure who licensed THE THIN RED LINE to Simitar in 1998 for release on DVD, but Simitar went bankrupt in 2000. Current copyright records indicate that 20th Century Fox now owns THE THIN RED LINE. But based upon Fox’s recent release of its own CinemaScope films in pan-and-scan MOD DVD versions, I wouldn’t hold out much hope for a new widescreen version of THE THIN RED LINE.

Screenwriter Bernard Gordon would go on to write the scripts for Security Pictures’ two big Cinerama epics of the late 1960s: CUSTER OF THE WEST (1968) and KRAKATOA: EAST OF JAVA (1969). He then produced a few films of his own in the early 1970s (BAD MAN’S RIVER, HORROR EXPRESS) before retiring. Gordon came out of retirement in 1999 to lead the protest against the honorary Oscar awarded to director Elia Kazan, who had supported the blacklist. That same year he published his autobiography: Hollywood Exile, or How I Learned to Love the Blacklist. Gordon died in 2007 at age 88.

Director Andrew Marton would direct Security Pictures’ 1965 sci-fi classic CRACK IN THE WORLD (this is one of those rare Security films that has been released on DVD/Blu-ray by its original distributor—Paramount—through its licensee Olive Films). Marton concluded his career doing second-unit work on films such as KELLY’S HEROES (1970) and THE DAY OF THE JACKAL (1973). He died in 1992 at age 87. Kier Dullea would have major roles in BUNNY LAKE IS MISSING (1965) and 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY (1968) before falling back into smaller features, TV movies, and series roles. He would basically take the 1990s off to focus on stage work, but returned to the screen in 2000. He has recently appeared in TV series such as “Castle” and “Damages.” Jack Warden continued work as a character actor for most of the next four decades. He appeared as Coach George Halas in the TV-movie “Brian’s Song’ (1971) and had memorable parts in …AND JUSTICE FOR ALL (1979) and THE VERDICT (1982). He died in 2006 at age 85. James Philbrook would continue in minor roles before moving to Europe for a string of Eurowesterns in the late 1960s and early 1970s. He then retired from acting. He died in 1982 at age 58.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 30, 2014 - 12:08 AM   
 By:   Richard-W   (Member)

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 31, 2014 - 8:14 AM   
 By:   arthur grant   (Member)

Just a quick update: Duel (the original TV version), One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, The Thin Red Line and Remember My Name have all been posted on the board. Thanks to all for the information and posters.

The Thin Red Line has been issued on DVD here in Australia in what appears to be an anamorphic widescreen transfer. When I can confirm this I will let everyone know. Of course it is a PAL disc either way.


Just an update on the update: 'The Thin Red Line' is indeed an anamorphic 2.35:1 transfer on DVD here in Australia issued by Shock Entertainment. Those interested in getting this please know that you will need PAL playback capability (I do not think most of the modern TVs and DVD players will have a problem with this) and a multi-region DVD player. I may be able to help. E-mail me at: arthur@thecinemacafe.com

 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2014 - 8:21 PM   
 By:   ST-321   (Member)

So why isn't Five Million Years to Earth (U.S.) aka Quatermass and the Pit out on disc? I really would love to own that flick.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2014 - 10:15 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

So why isn't Five Million Years to Earth (U.S.) aka Quatermass and the Pit out on disc? I really would love to own that flick.


That film was released on an Anchor Bay Region 1 DVD in 1998 and again on a double feature disc (with QUATERMASS 2) in 2004. Both discs are now OOP. A Region B Blu-ray/DVD combo is currently available.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_c_0_9?url=search-alias%3Dmovies-tv&field-keywords=five%20million%20years%20to%20earth&sprefix=five+mill%2Caps%2C367

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 5, 2014 - 12:05 AM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

.....In a 1999 interview, James Jones’ daughter Kaylie said that there are reasons for the film’s low visibility: "It's not a good film,” she declared. “[It] doesn't know what it is. It was made in the early '60s. There was no such thing as an 'antiwar' film.



Wow! Someone needs to send Kaylie a Blu-ray of the restored 1930 production, ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT!

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 8, 2014 - 3:18 AM   
 By:   arthur grant   (Member)

.....In a 1999 interview, James Jones’ daughter Kaylie said that there are reasons for the film’s low visibility: "It's not a good film,” she declared. “[It] doesn't know what it is. It was made in the early '60s. There was no such thing as an 'antiwar' film.



Wow! Someone needs to send Kaylie a Blu-ray of the restored 1930 production, ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT!


...or Men in War or Paths of Glory...or...

 
 Posted:   Sep 8, 2014 - 1:55 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

RENALDO AND CLARA

Bob Dylan's film of his Rolling Thunder revue from 1976 also includes dramtic scenes written by Sam SHephard.
Reortedly so bad it has never been released on video.

I want to see it for the scenes with Phil Ochs - my musical hero
brm

 
 Posted:   Sep 9, 2014 - 11:17 AM   
 By:   Dyfrynt   (Member)

Seconding:

The Thing from Another World.
Robin & Marian.
The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms.
War of the Worlds.

And Adding:

Watership Down.


 
 
 Posted:   Sep 9, 2014 - 3:25 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

And there's the notorious bomb, "Inchon"!

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 9, 2014 - 7:46 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

And there's the notorious bomb, "Inchon"!


INCHON has never had a video release on any format. The film was originally released in the U.S. by MGM/UA, but since it was pre-1987, control should now rest with Warner Bros.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 15, 2014 - 3:14 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Giles Cooper OBE was an Anglo-Irish playwright and prolific radio dramatist, writing over sixty scripts for BBC Radio and television. He wrote his radio play, "Unman, Wittering and Zigo" in 1958. He later turned it into a teleplay of the same name in 1965 for the BBC2 program Theatre 625. The play is a thriller set in a traditional boy’s boarding school where a senior teacher has just been killed in a tragic accident. Ultimately, the play became part of the curriculum for the General Certificate of Secondary Education and Standard Grade English coursework in the United Kingdom, and is frequently performed in public schools.

In 1971, Scottish film director John Mackenzie (THE LONG GOOD FRIDAY, 1980), along with writer Simon Raven (television’s Edward and Mrs. Simpson), adapted UNMAN, WITTERING AND ZIGO for the screen. Raven stayed true to the basic plot, but added some sexual scenes. Filming was done from early August to mid-October 1970 in Berkshire and Caernavonshire, England, as well as in Scotland. The film starred David Hemmings and Douglas Wilmer. Michael J. Lewis provided the score.

When Paramount opened the film in New York on 13 June 1971, it struck most critics, including Variety’s “Gene” as a “compelling” and “disturbing” psychological suspense drama filled with “gripping and graphic scenes of a school chillingly situated above the cliffs of disaster.” But “Gene’s” remark that the “intriguing” film “asked a great deal of credence” was also echoed by many of his colleagues. Also taking note of the “basically unbelievable premise,” Time’s Jay Cocks nevertheless held that the picture delivered “some nice, subdued thrills.” And Cue’s Donald J. Mayerson, while admitting that “this taut, terrifying, and riveting movie demands a mature audience capable of dealing with an unusually graphic linkage of sex and violence,” likewise contended that “the film is so well done [that] one can excuse its flaws.”

In New York magazine, Judith Crist called UNMAN, WITTERING AND ZIGO “an absolutely stunning film—one that deals not merely with teenagers but with the codes within which we raise the young and therefore with the morality and ethics of our society.” And while Gary Arnold of The Washington Post declared that, as a mystery, the film was “abysmally incompetent” and “less than meets the eye,” he was contradicted by the critical majority, who concurred with the New York Daily News’ Ann Guarino that even though “the ending may seem weak,” the film was “a taut suspense drama” with “enough mystery to command attention.”

Unfortunately, UNMAN, WITTERING AND ZIGO has never appeared on any home video format. This is another film from the Paramount catalog in which Olive Films has shown no interest. However, it is available for streaming or download on Amazon.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 16, 2014 - 10:13 AM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

And what about the cable television film "Gore Vidal's Billy The Kid"? It was issued on V.H.S. but the Warner Archive Collection has no interest putting it out on D.V.D.-R..

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 21, 2014 - 9:39 PM   
 By:   arthur grant   (Member)



Okay, for only the SECOND time (that I've noticed) another title can be removed from this board. Warner Archives has announced THE LUSTY MEN will be released soon. Hooray!

More info here: http://shop.warnerarchive.com/

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 21, 2014 - 10:04 PM   
 By:   arthur grant   (Member)



Double post.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 10, 2014 - 9:07 PM   
 By:   Preston Neal Jones   (Member)

You get TV -- but do you get GetTV? If you do have that channel, which apparently shows films complete but with commercials, then Sunday night 7PM EST you can catch a broadcast of FOOLS' PARADE. Haven't been watching the channel enough to guess whether this might be in widescreen. I could very well be wrong, (as I often am), but, Bob D. to the contrary notwithstanding, I very much doubt that TCM has shown FOOLS' PARADE, widescreen or otherwise, in recent years. Personally, I haven't caught it for over a decade or two, in a theater or on the tube. As I may have mentioned before, when the American Cinematheque wanted to screen PARADE some years ago, they were unable to locate a useable print.

(In my book about THE NIGHT OF THE HUNTER, I discuss FOOLS' PARADE as well as another movie mentioned in this thread, THE NAKED AND THE DEAD -- PARADE because of its Davis Grubb source novel, and DEAD because it was originally gong to be Laughton's follow-up to directing HUNTER.)

 
 Posted:   Oct 11, 2014 - 1:51 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

DUFFY w/James Coburn as a iconoclastic thief a la DEAD HEAT....

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 12, 2014 - 3:22 AM   
 By:   riotengine   (Member)

You get TV -- but do you get GetTV? If you do have that channel, which apparently shows films complete but with commercials, then Sunday night 7PM EST you can catch a broadcast of FOOLS' PARADE. Haven't been watching the channel enough to guess whether this might be in widescreen. I could very well be wrong, (as I often am), but, Bob D. to the contrary notwithstanding, I very much doubt that TCM has shown FOOLS' PARADE, widescreen or otherwise, in recent years. Personally, I haven't caught it for over a decade or two, in a theater or on the tube. As I may have mentioned before, when the American Cinematheque wanted to screen PARADE some years ago, they were unable to locate a useable print.

(In my book about THE NIGHT OF THE HUNTER, I discuss FOOLS' PARADE as well as another movie mentioned in this thread, THE NAKED AND THE DEAD -- PARADE because of its Davis Grubb source novel, and DEAD because it was originally gong to be Laughton's follow-up to directing HUNTER.)


If the GetTV schedule is correct, they are showing it twice.

Greg Espinoza

 
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