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This is a comments thread about FSM CD: David Raksin at M-G-M
 
 Posted:   May 26, 2009 - 7:22 PM   
 By:   Gary S.   (Member)

Across the Wide Missouri makes a nice score double feature with How the West was Won. I don't regret this purchase at all.

 
 
 Posted:   May 27, 2009 - 7:20 PM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

.....(--And . . . Donen?).....


I once worked with Stanley Donen, and another time with the late Peter Donen, his son.

I asked Peter this question.

Peter pronounced his own name "Donnen" and he said the family, including Stanley, always thought this was correct.

However, Peter also said that he once asked his father, Stanley, why he generally pronounced it "Dough-nen" and Stanley told him that he'd decided he'd better pronounce it "Dough-nen" because, early in his career, people would spell his name in articles and reviews about him in print as Stanley "Donnen" if he didn't.

And yet, on the other hand, I've heard various people who worked with him, including Debbie Reynolds, Gene Kelly, Cyd Charisse, pronounce it either way.

This will be a question for the ages, and the real answer is that he probably used EITHER pronunciation at one time or another.

 
 
 Posted:   May 31, 2009 - 3:36 PM   
 By:   Preston Neal Jones   (Member)

I think you've all missed the true significance of this box set, which is that Lukas and company have finally released the score from a film that had its premiere in my home town, New Canaan, Connecticut. I'm referring to THE GIRL IN WHITE, based on the life story of one of my best friend's relatives, which is why the film opened first in our little town.

But seriously, folks, the Raksin box is yet another of the countless dreams come true for which I have FSM to thank. (That's the difference, I guess, between Manderley and me. I dream, but he pesters. If that's what it took, I guess I have to thank Manderley, too!) However briskly it may or not have been selling, this collection's existence is simply NECESSARY. Raksin was a major American 20th Century composer and cultural figure, and the scores heard in this FSM release represent an important portion of his work. I guess whether or not one purchases this beautiful box can be summed up by paraphrasing what was said about spirituality in the Fox film of Werfel's SONG OF BERNADETTE: To those who don't appreciate Raksin's contribution to film music, no persuasion is possible; to those who do appreciate it, no persuasion is necessary.

***

(My only quibble: All these years I've hoped FSM would release the PAT AND MIKE music with its brilliantly clever main title use of sports sound effects for percussion -- and when they finally present us with PAT AND MIKE, they give us the main titles without the sounds! If the complete composite track didn't exist, couldn't FSM have just used the titles off the actual film -- or would that have been legally prohibited?)

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 4, 2009 - 7:33 AM   
 By:   Preston Neal Jones   (Member)

This is one of those threads I seem to have killed by posting on it. But I'm bumping it back up on the pecking order because I still would like to know the story behind the PAT AND MIKE main titles.

C'mon, Lukas, you've had enough time by now to rest up after the Open House...

smile

 
 Posted:   Jun 4, 2009 - 7:35 AM   
 By:   mark ford   (Member)

This is one of those threads I seem to have killed by posting on it.

Perhaps everyone wants to give you the last word in honor of your return. Ooops, I blew it. smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 4, 2009 - 7:42 AM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

.....(My only quibble: All these years I've hoped FSM would release the PAT AND MIKE music with its brilliantly clever main title use of sports sound effects for percussion -- and when they finally present us with PAT AND MIKE, they give us the main titles without the sounds! If the complete composite track didn't exist, couldn't FSM have just used the titles off the actual film -- or would that have been legally prohibited?).....


Always complaining!

If the cue HAD the sound effects, you'd be complaining that you'd like the cue MINUS the sound effects.

I don't know what's with you young whippersnapper fanboys!

You are never satisfied!

big grin big grin big grin

 
 Posted:   Jun 4, 2009 - 8:57 AM   
 By:   Jeff Eldridge   (Member)

I'm sure Lukas will chime in when he gets the chance. I do remember discussing this issue with both Lukas and Marilee Bradford about 9 months ago, and seem to recall that the answer is simply that what's heard on the CD was what was recorded by Raksin -- the sound effects department must have added the tennis and golf noises later.

 
 Posted:   Jun 4, 2009 - 9:03 AM   
 By:   shicorp   (Member)

I guess if I had had the choice to include only one version, I would also have opted for the one sans sound effects. Simply, because the other one is available to the public, whereas this one isn't. There are even cases in which the composite track sounds better than the degraded session tapes, but still it would be better to include the version from the original tapes, because the other one is already out there

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 4, 2009 - 9:13 AM   
 By:   peterproud   (Member)

I'd like to know how many copies are left because I still want to pick this one up...Lukas?

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 5, 2009 - 8:56 AM   
 By:   Lester Sullivan   (Member)

The sixty dollar price tag is why it hasn't sold out? Foolish, when, as has been pointed out, it comes to only twelve dollars for each very-well-filled disc. Here's one case in which the expression "do the math" is particularly poignant. Pity all those who have thus far passed on the rare opportunity this set represents. How many copies are left?

 
 Posted:   Jun 5, 2009 - 9:58 AM   
 By:   mark ford   (Member)

The sixty dollar price tag is why it hasn't sold out? Foolish, when, as has been pointed out, it comes to only twelve dollars for each very-well-filled disc. Here's one case in which the expression "do the math" is particularly poignant. Pity all those who have thus far passed on the rare opportunity this set represents. How many copies are left?

I agree the dollar per disc price is quite reasonable. I think that perhaps it's just the overall cost that may be hurting it in our recessed economy. Lukas pretty much indicated he was aware of that. It's sort of like selling a collection of DVDs for the outrageous price of $1 apiece, but the collection has 200 CDs in it. How could you pass up such a bargain? But, you do have to have $200 available to buy it which right now many may not. I'm sure it will eventually sell out, especially as the economy improves.

I might also add that many aren't that aware of Raksin's music as so little of it has been made available up until now, so Lukas is blazing the trail here and that can sometimes be difficult. I applaud FSM for taking it on.

 
 Posted:   Jun 5, 2009 - 9:59 AM   
 By:   Lukas Kendall   (Member)

I'm sure Lukas will chime in when he gets the chance. I do remember discussing this issue with both Lukas and Marilee Bradford about 9 months ago, and seem to recall that the answer is simply that what's heard on the CD was what was recorded by Raksin -- the sound effects department must have added the tennis and golf noises later.

This is more or less what happened. Sorry I don't have a better explanation.

Lukas

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 5, 2009 - 3:05 PM   
 By:   Preston Neal Jones   (Member)

You may not have a great explanation, but boy, do you have a great box of music you've shared with us. Full of dreams come true, and many revelations on top of that. Thanks, Lukas, for another superb contribution to the preservation of the Art and Craft.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 10, 2009 - 3:44 PM   
 By:   jonnewsom   (Member)

I second Manderley's opinion of this set. Raksin's versatility is mindboggling. My personal favorite in the set is UNTIL THEY SAIL. I've played it over and over.

Speaking of Raksin, I watched SEPARATE TABLES the other night on MGM HD. Another fine Raksin score I would like to own. Does anyone know if the original recordings still exist?


David Raksin's manuscripts and recordings were given to the Library of Congress. They include the original acetate disks for "Separate Tables." Excerpts were released on an LP that accompanied a book published by the Library, "Wonderful Inventions," that has two articles I wrote on animated film music (with examples from "The Unicorn in the Garden") and four films scored by Raksin: "Force of Evil," "Carrie," "Separate Tables," and "The Redeemer." The book is out of print, but you may be able to get a copy of the recording by contacting the Motion Picture, Broadcasting and Recorded Sound Division.

You can get more information by going to the Library of Congress website (loc.gov).

 
 Posted:   Aug 10, 2009 - 4:12 PM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

We knew this would be a tough sell especially during these tough economic times but it was important to us to do it.

Lukas



And that is what makes your entire series so extraordinarly important to recorded film music.

 
 Posted:   Aug 10, 2009 - 4:16 PM   
 By:   rollon1959   (Member)

 
 Posted:   Aug 10, 2009 - 4:26 PM   
 By:   LeHah   (Member)

And that is what makes your entire series so extraordinarly important to recorded film music.



EXACTLY THIS.

 
 Posted:   Aug 10, 2009 - 6:19 PM   
 By:   Dana Wilcox   (Member)

The fascinating thing to me is that there seems to be a good cross-section of ages among the fans of this set. Very encouraging! (Frame of reference: Almost everyone here is younger than me! I won't say who isn't...) During my "formative years" of collecting there was, literally, not so much as a single Raksin LP to be had. Correct me if I'm wrong, but it seems that it was not until WILL PENNY (1968) came along that any of Raksin's music ever appeared on LP. And maybe not again until FOREVER AMBER (Varese) or THE BAD AND THE BEAUTIFUL (Rhino) that anything made it to CD. Jeepers! Extraordinarily wonderful to see more finally coming out. It has been a joy discovering this music!

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 11, 2009 - 1:17 AM   
 By:   manderley   (Member)

.....Correct me if I'm wrong, but it seems that it was not until WILL PENNY (1968) came along that any of Raksin's music ever appeared on LP.....

In terms of "extended" scores.....
SEVEN WONDERS OF THE WORLD (1956)....on promo LP
SYLVIA/TOO LATE BLUES on Mercury (ca.1965)

(and we had endless single arrangements of "Laura", "Bad and the Beautiful" Theme, and the soundtrack cut of "Toy Concertino" from GROUNDS FOR MARRIAGE in 1951.)

Fortunately, you inserted that wonderful waffle-word, "seems" in your post, so you get a free pass!!! smile

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 11, 2009 - 3:31 AM   
 By:   antipodean   (Member)

It's sort of like selling a collection of DVDs for the outrageous price of $1 apiece, but the collection has 200 CDs in it. How could you pass up such a bargain? But, you do have to have $200 available to buy it which right now many may not.

That happened to me once with a lot of Criterion Collection DVDs - it was the complete set of every title (up until then) although they weren't quite $1 each. (On hindsight, I should have rounded up a couple of cinephile friends and went for the lot, then figured out how to split the loot once we'd gotten it...)

 
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