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This is a comments thread about Blog Post: Film Score Friday 3/22/13 by Scott Bettencourt
 
 Posted:   Mar 22, 2013 - 6:16 PM   
 By:   Scott Bettencourt   (Member)

Nice to see "Idaho Transfer" on this list. A Film that barely got a release. And directed by Peter Fonda.

And "Z.P.G." barely played a week in theaters before disappearing almost into oblivion.

I would add 1970's "No Blade of Grass", based on the 1956 science fiction novel by John Christopher. It's another end of the world scenario, concerning a virus that is wiping out all wheat and rice crops, leading to an almost Mad Max like society. Composer is Burnell Whibley, and it looks like this is his only feature film.


Just added No Blade of Grass and Warlords of Atlantis, as well as the full title to Buckaroo Banzai.

 
 Posted:   Mar 24, 2013 - 6:46 AM   
 By:   RoryR   (Member)

Then the success of Star Wars (basically, like E.T., a fantasy film with sci-fi trappings like aliens and spaceships) suggested that people wanted to see science-fiction with space battles and laser beams.

Wait a minute here.... wasn't that proven back in late 1930's and '40s with "Flash Gordon" and "Buck Rodgers"?

My friend, maybe it's that I'm a little older than you (I was born in 1959), but for me, having lived through it as a kid, the promise of PLANET OF THE APES and 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY (My two favorite movies) was not fulfilled in the 1970's. As far as I'm concerned, the majority of '70s Science Fiction films were pretty close to being dreck, from the APES sequels through LOGAN'S RUN and STAR TREK: TMP. I don't consider COLOSSUS: THE FORBIN PROJECT '70s Science Fiction because it was made in 1968. STAR WARS? It's was then, now and forever... for kids. And SOYLENT GREEN isn't people... SOYLENT GREEN is crap.

 
 Posted:   Mar 26, 2013 - 9:23 AM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)


If anyone can think of any actual rejected scores (as opposed to composers who were attached to a film but probably didn't get around to recording a score -- I believe Mychael Danna on HULK and Mark Isham on WATERWORLD fall into this category) to add to the list, please let me know.


Those two had demos, but didn't get to the recording phase.

Some missing ones from my list:
http://www.rejectedfilmscores.150m.com/list.html

1968
BARBARELLA -- Michel Magne
LAND OF THE GIANTS: "THE CRASH" PILOT EPISODE -- Alexander Courage
2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY -- Frank Cordell

1976
THE MAN WHO FELL TO EARTH -- David Bowie

1984
V: THE FINAL BATTLE (Episode 2) -- Barry DeVorzon & Joseph Conlan

1985
DOCTOR WHO: "THE MARK OF RANI (Part 1)" -- John Lewis

1986
INVADERS FROM MARS -- Christopher Young

1987
DR. WHO: "PARADISE TOWERS" (Season 24) -- David Snell

1989
ALIENATOR -- Chuck Cirino
CYBORG -- James Saad & Anthony 'Tony' Riparetti (does this count?)

1990
MOON 44 -- Kuno Schmid (unfinished)

1995:
JOHNNY MNEMONIC -- Group: Black Rain (also, another score which I list under "UN-USED", for Mychael Danna)

1996
GATTACA -- Danny Elfman

1998
WING COMMANDER -- Robert O. Ragland

1999:
INSPECTOR GADGET -- Marc Shaiman

2000
THE BOURNE IDENTITY -- Carter Burwell (only over 20 minutes recorded; unfinished)
MISSION TO MARS -- Ryuichi Sakamoto

2002
HIGHLANDER: ENDGAME -- Nick Glennie-Smith (about half replaced)

2004
BLADE 3: TRINITY -- Terence Blanchard (possibly incompleted)

2005
AEON FLUX -- Johnny Klimek & Reinhold Heil.
KING KONG -- Howard Shore
STEALTH -- Randy Edelman

2007
FRED CLAUS -- Rolfe Kent
STARDUST -- John Ottman
TERMINATOR: THE SARAH CONNER CHRONICLES -- Blake Neely

2010
CLASH OF THE TITANS -- Craig Armstrong / Neil Davidge (unfinished)
THE WOLFMAN -- Paul Haslinger

2011
ARTHUR CHRISTMAS -- Michael Giacchino & Adam Cohen (unfinished)

2012
DREDD -- Ben Salisbury & Geoff Barrow (unfinished)
UPSIDE DOWN -- Mark Isham. He was hired to replace Charset, but apparently the film opened with Charset's score. If you hurry, you can go to Kraft-Engel and hear a nearly five-minute cue from Isham's score, before it's taken down. I've of course saved it.

2013
STOKER -- Philip Glass



More demo scores (at various stages of completeness; some with corchestra, some with computers):

1984
2010: THE YEAR WE MAKE CONTACT -- Tony Banks

1987
PREDATOR -- Patrick Moraz

1998
LOST IN SPACE -- Mark Isham

2002
EQUILIBRIUM -- Graeme Revell

And more under "DEMOS".


More information for each title, where possible, on the site (for those curious).


Would "Practical Magic" and "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" count?

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 28, 2013 - 6:20 AM   
 By:   Joe E.   (Member)

When I saw "Star Wars," it was called "Star Wars." There was no episode number, there was no "A New Hope." So I'm not sure how calling it "Star Wars" could possibly be the wrong thing to call it.

I did parenthetically note this in my earlier reply. I was mainly talking about the next two.

The episode numbers were there, of course, for "The Empire Strikes Back" and "Return of the Jedi." But nobody would have dreamed of calling them "Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back" (etc.) until 1999, when "Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace" came out. It wasn't even considered. Nobody -- not even George Lucas -- referred to them that way.

I did; I still have old correspondence to prove it. Moreover, George Lucas and others did occasionally refer to them as "Episode V" or "Episode VI," say, as opposed to "The Empire Strikes Back" and "Return of the Jedi." I do think you're largely right in that few people ever referred to them conversationally that way; most people tend to abbreviate titles when talking about movies. However, there's a different set of expectations with a straightforward list of movie titles in, say, a piece of journalism.

The behind-the-scenes specials were called things like "Classic Creatures: Return of the Jedi," not "Classic Creatures: Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi." (And what about that one called "From Star Wars to Jedi: The Making of a Saga." Where's that "New Hope" thing? Isn't "Jedi" also "Star Wars"?)

This whole cumbersome naming thing began when the new trilogy came out. It felt like a marketing choice more than anything else -- lead with "Star Wars" (a long-dormant franchise), then tease with "Episode I" so we'd know we were back at the beginning.

That's fine. But I don't know how you can be too purist about it. And I hardly think calling the films by what they were called when they were released is somehow a lack of "respect."


It's certainly true the original movies weren't widely referred to (or even at all) by their episode numbers in their original marketing, while the prequels were (undoubtedly to help communicate the idea to general audiences that these were set before the originals, as you say), but if nothing else the original sequels did use the umbrella "Star Wars" title on their posters and such - Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back and Star Wars: Return of the Jedi. They actually were fairly frequently referred to that way back then.

I do of course realize that not everyone who speaks simply of "THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK" intends it as some sort of diminishment. However, it's just plain strange to me to see a list of titles - a literal list of titles - that uses those "short-form" titles for the originals and then lists the prequels by their full titles (or something close to them, anyway).

______________________________________


As long as everyone else is also discussing omissions, shouldn't The Incredibles be on the list, too?

 
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