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 Posted:   Mar 6, 2009 - 5:17 AM   
 By:   Scott M (Oldsmith)   (Member)


What baffles me, frankly, is how many people around here seem to enjoy this kind of endless, droning crap. I mean, maybe it works in the film sometimes, but as a separate listen? Good God, the stuff is almost intolerable.


I feel the same way about a great deal of Morricone's "non-Hollywood" scores, but there you are. There's something for everyone.

 
 Posted:   Mar 6, 2009 - 10:40 AM   
 By:   Warlok   (Member)

I can appreciate a score bereft of identifiable melodies if it serves the film best to feature such. I think what a great deal of people on these boards lament is the growingly popular trend to take this approach with most of the "biggest" motion pictures these days. In the heydays of Goldsmith, Williams, Poledouris, and Morricone, a "big picture" would almost invariably demand a big melody.

And I definitely admit to preferring strong melodies in my listening experiences away from the films that would spawn them.

Scores like Tora Tora Tora are the exception to the modern day rule. It used to be the reverse.

 
 Posted:   Mar 6, 2009 - 11:31 AM   
 By:   MD   (Member)

I was just listening to Watchman score - something I like something was worse, but I must say that tracks Edward Blake the Comedian, You quit and I love you Mom are fantastic. There are samples, synths, guitars and all have atmosphere. I can´t describe this tracks exactly but there is something like "Pink Floyd" sound which I really like specially with using of guitars and synths. There aren´t great solos but it has that atmosphere.

Yes this music isn´t like Goldsmith, Poledouris, Williams music with fantastic themes.
Tyler Bates is guitaris and he knows how use this instrument and I can´t remember when I last heard track like Blake Edward the Comedian.

I am enjoying now The Island of Dr. Moreau and really like Raksin set. But I know that the tracks which I mentioned will be played very often.

Sorry for my englishsmile
All the best
MD

 
 Posted:   Mar 6, 2009 - 3:52 PM   
 By:   bdm   (Member)

Just say the movie - actually didn't notice the score, just the songs.

...Is there a score in it?

EDIT - Oh, and I don't mind Bates, so this is not a slam, but I honestly didn't notice a score. But the songs work really well.

 
 Posted:   Mar 6, 2009 - 3:55 PM   
 By:   dman   (Member)

There's actually a sizeable amount of score in the film, though in my opinion the instrumental music used best in the film was written by P. Glass. It was ver effective during the Dr. Manhattan origin sequence.

Though I did like the score near the end of the film - the guitar riffs people like aren't too bad, but they were out of place IMO, like something from Lethal Weapon. Wrong wrong.

 
 Posted:   Mar 6, 2009 - 4:06 PM   
 By:   Jeff Bond   (Member)

Nothing struck me as out of place in the movie--has no one mentioned all the Philip Glass material is from Koyaanisquatsi? Given its 80s origins that's appropriate, although it's always bizarre when actual film scoring from one film gets tracked into another.

I actually enjoyed the movie. It's flawed and of course can't capture the depth of the graphic novel but it's entertaining on its own--I thought Jackie Earle Haley was extraordinary and Billy Crudup (who normally bores me silly) and Patrick Wilson (who's always good) were very good. The old age makeup was bad, some performances (Silk Spectre and Ozymandias) were ineffectual, but overall it looked great and held my interest.

 
 Posted:   Mar 6, 2009 - 4:28 PM   
 By:   bdm   (Member)

Yea, I'd agree - a solid 3/5.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 6, 2009 - 10:43 PM   
 By:   Musicman416   (Member)

I'm listening to the iTunes samples, and "Don't Get Too Misty Eyed" actually sounds surprisingly lush and pretty.

 
 Posted:   Mar 7, 2009 - 5:53 AM   
 By:   Olivier   (Member)

Nothing struck me as out of place in the movie--has no one mentioned all the Philip Glass material is from Koyaanisquatsi?

Having already written then expanded my comments on the film and music on two other boards, I did not feel like copying it here again (and try to add a bit to it if possible).

In short, I was not surprised to find out that music from another composer had been used, and that it corresponded in one case with a moment I liked a lot (now, this had surprised me).

Jeff, I saw in the credits that music from Glass' The Hours had been tracked in Watchmen as well.

 
 Posted:   Mar 7, 2009 - 9:01 AM   
 By:   Jon A. Bell   (Member)

I actually enjoyed the movie. It's flawed and of course can't capture the depth of the graphic novel but it's entertaining on its own--I thought Jackie Earle Haley was extraordinary and Billy Crudup (who normally bores me silly) and Patrick Wilson (who's always good) were very good. The old age makeup was bad, some performances (Silk Spectre and Ozymandias) were ineffectual, but overall it looked great and held my interest.

Pretty much my opinion of the film as well. I couldn't shake the feeling that, despite its striking visual look, it was a paint-by-numbers version of the original comic (and I've never been a big fan of the graphic novel.) I wasn't bored, but after re-reading the graphic novel recently and seeing all the trailers, there was very little in the film that surprised me.

The only scene that really got my blood pumping was the burning building rescue scene, which felt genuinely heroic.

 
 Posted:   Mar 7, 2009 - 10:38 AM   
 By:   Michaelware   (Member)

I didnt notice any music.
The whole thing was hilariously awful, like Batman and Robin only amped up with Eli Roth torture porn aesthetics. I thought it tracked the book ok until it threw in various propagandas. If it wasnt in slow motion it would have been 80 minutes.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 7, 2009 - 10:39 AM   
 By:   films1   (Member)

Just listened to the score , very bland , just noise in my opinion not inspired at all ...

 
 Posted:   Mar 7, 2009 - 10:48 AM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)

Do you know, I got the OST of the remake of TDTESS at Christmas and I still have not played it?

 
 Posted:   Mar 7, 2009 - 10:53 AM   
 By:   LeHah   (Member)

The whole thing was hilariously awful, like Batman and Robin only amped up with Eli Roth torture porn aesthetics.

I've heard a lot of people (people, not critics) say that the movie over-accentuates the violence in the film. Would anyone else here agree with that? (It seems a strange thing to take note of - considering the graphic content of horror films in this day and age)

 
 Posted:   Mar 7, 2009 - 12:41 PM   
 By:   Jon A. Bell   (Member)

The whole thing was hilariously awful, like Batman and Robin only amped up with Eli Roth torture porn aesthetics.

I've heard a lot of people (people, not critics) say that the movie over-accentuates the violence in the film. Would anyone else here agree with that? (It seems a strange thing to take note of - considering the graphic content of horror films in this day and age)


I agree. I was never a fan of the graphic novel, which I felt was excessively violent, but the film amps up the gore even in scenes that (IMO) don't require it.

[SPOILERS FOR ANYONE UNFAMILIAR WITH THE STORY]

The opening fight between the Comedian and his assailant is so brutally nasty that it somewhat desensitizes you to the violence that comes afterwards. It's not really even a fight scene -- it's basically a prolonged murder of a man who's too tough to die immediately, but who's facing a supernaturally skilled and vicious opponent who's toying with him like a cat with a mouse.

In addition, the attempted rape scene with the original Silk Spectre was much more violent that it needed to be -- yes, the scene is supposed to be ugly, but there's a point in which I felt it was being really abusive to the audience as well.

Consequently, moments that should be REALLY shocking (such as the Comedian and the woman in the bar in Vietnam) actually feel muted as a result, and later scenes come across as simply gore porn (Rorshach's murder of a child killer, and the aftermath of Dr. Manhattan using his "powers" on certain characters.) The gore was unnecessary, and actually made those scenes so over-the-top as to become ridiculous.

I have a feeling this movie is going to make a ton of money opening weekend, then drop substantially after the hard-core fans have seen it and general word-of-mouth spreads.

[Slightly off-topic rant: I'm getting really, REALLY tired of the trend in action films (especially comic book films) of showing people being thrown through the air and slamming into walls, through glass doors, tables, and so on, as a substitute for in-your-face fisticuffs. In reality, unless you're Superman or the Hulk, getting thrown bodily through the air and slamming into anything harder than a futon is going to knock you out of commission immediately. The same goes for people being thrown through the air by explosions, for God's sake: if a blast is powerful enough to fling you through the air, the concussion is going to kill you, period.]

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 7, 2009 - 11:53 PM   
 By:   JADSTERSDAD   (Member)

Well, I've never read the graphic novel and studiously avoided doing so until seeing the film (I will do so now, for sure). I thoroughly enjoyed it and thought it a great film.

 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2009 - 12:04 AM   
 By:   The Mutant   (Member)

I dunno if I'll see it. I can't watch films with rape scenes (which I'm told this has more than one).

 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2009 - 7:18 PM   
 By:   MikeJ   (Member)

I only remember one... and while it is tough, it should be mentioned that this is an attempted rape and it gets interrupted, thankfully.

I liked the movie. They covered a lot more ground than I thought they would. I still feel that an HBO miniseries would have served the material better, though. It's a tremendous amount of information to process in one sitting. I would heartily recommend to others, though, as strongly as I would that they read the graphic novel, if they haven't, because that will enrich the experience.

 
 Posted:   Mar 9, 2009 - 4:00 AM   
 By:   Hercule Platini   (Member)

Saw the film on Friday, underwhelmed. The score did not stand out and I couldn't tell you a damn thing about it.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 9, 2009 - 6:04 AM   
 By:   Miragliano   (Member)

Saw the film, thoroughly enjoyed it.


<< SPOILER ALERT>>







I've never read the graphic novel so i'm judging the film on it's own merits.

It is EXTREMELY violent, exploding gore and blood is liberally splashed everywhere. I didn't actually think it was too much. Most of the ultra violence is centred around Rorsach and the Comedian and just emphasizes their violent, sociopathic natures. For example, the Comedian shooting the pregnant woman in the stomach (pregnant with his own child!) was sickening but served to illustrate both his and Dr Manhattan's attitudes. Dr Manhattan could have prevented the shooting but didn't.

There is one attempted rape scene, perpetrated by the Comedian on Silk Spectre I. While extremely brutal, it serves to illustrate just how ammoral the Comedian is and is part of his character set-up. The rape itself does not actually happen. The attempted rape has even more impact later on when we learn that Silk Spectre II's father was the Comedian.

This maybe a film based on a graphic novel but I think having a mature attitude helps in appreciating it. Here in the UK it has an 18 rating.

If you're the sort of person who giggles at the sight of a dangling blue cock or is squeamish at the thought of watching outright brutality, this film is not for you.

The score was in the background for the most part although certain cues stood out such as the noirish Blade Runneresque cue that came on in the rainy night scenes. I actually appreciate the score more for having seen the film. It's no work of art but I am listening to it quite a bit.

 
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