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 Posted:   Dec 2, 2013 - 3:43 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

Hey, Graham.

I wonder if you would ever consider the concert music by Leonard Bernstein as belonging to your grouping of Friedhofer, Raksin, North & Rosenman?

Having recently listened to a piece by Leonard B and a piece by Aaron Copland, I'm thinking that Copland would not enter into this cadre for similar reasons as you deign onto Elmer Bernstein as being too much Elmer to join the club. Is Copland too much Aaron (that is, too extroverted or too life-affirming in his positivity) to be included in these composers of psychological and melancholy and jazzy music?


Tone, it would be rude of me not to answer this, since you did address the question to me, but - I really don't know the answer. I'm not familiar enough with Leonard Bernstein's concert music or Aaron Copland in general to be able to put them in the right seats on that railroad wagon compartment, or leave one half-hanging out the window, or on a completely different train... I think I'm burned out on this issue.

Yavar mentioned that if I put Elmer Bernstein on a different train, then I should do the same with Rosenman. But I wasn't talking so much about the dum-dum-dum-dum Rosenman I love so much, more the kind of understated melancholy that plays under dialogue in some of his '50s scores.

It's perhaps interesting to note that one of the reasons why Burt (in the aforementioned book) chose to focus on Raksin, Friedhofer, North and Rosenman in particular was due to their extraordinary ability to underscore dialogue scenes. Now, I'm out of my depth here, but maybe those composers are reacting to the underlying emotions of a scene in a "similar" way - and given that their backgrounds have a few points in common..., well, maybe that's what I'm associating in my head. Again, that might just be a lot of hogwash.

So, to cut a long story short: THE END

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 2, 2013 - 5:13 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

I've only just seen this thread, and have given it much thought over the weekend. I've stumbled upon the answer, Graham, that everyone's been stretching for - the common denominator, if you will. It's that they all...what, THE END, you say?

Well, okay then.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 2, 2013 - 5:33 AM   
 By:   Lester Sullivan   (Member)

This is one of the most provocative posts I've ever read here.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 2, 2013 - 7:08 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

I've only just seen this thread, and have given it much thought over the weekend. I've stumbled upon the answer, Graham, that everyone's been stretching for - the common denominator, if you will. It's that they all...what, THE END, you say?

Well, okay then.


No fear, Big Man - that was just a spontaneous thing a friend of mine once said when he was rambling on and on and could see that we were losing interest - "Anyway, to cut a long story short, the end." That was funny indeed! So no, this thread is not dead, at least while other people keep posting! My brain's bleeding with all this thinking, so I'm going to give it a rest for a while. But I shall be back when normal intelligence resumes.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 2, 2013 - 7:11 AM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

This is one of the most provocative posts I've ever read here.

Lester, do you mean Tall Guy's post immediately preceding yours? Well, he's a provocative chap...

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 2, 2013 - 10:03 AM   
 By:   Lester Sullivan   (Member)

I mean the entire, or most of, this thread.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 2, 2013 - 7:10 PM   
 By:   RM Eastman   (Member)

Another streamofconsciousness question - If you like Raksin (for example), do you also have the others amongst your favourites?


I don't like Raksin.


I don't either except for maybe 3 scores, and the same for Friedhofer I like/love maybe 10 of his scores ay best.

 
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