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 Posted:   Nov 17, 2008 - 8:50 AM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)

RIP Jim Mooney: August 13, 1919-March 30, 2008.







The images below adorned his letterhead:



And then there are his other incredible work (among others too vastly varied to include):







plus this lil' penultimate sequence:



Where craftsmanship and artistry is concerned,



we sure did frown

 
 Posted:   Nov 27, 2009 - 5:27 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Monday Mornin' Musings Department:

Sometimes the darnest images pop into your head while you're shavin'. Of all things,



popped into our cranium today for some truly unfathomable reason.

Now, we came along near the end of its original run but were strangely fascinated by writer Michael Fleischer's handle on the character.

Anyone else? ... eek


Smacks me of old Eastwoood. Not Leone so much, just... Clint.


The Jonah Hex lettercol often mentioned Eastwood as being perfect to play Hex, seeing as Clint had just wowed us with The Outlaw Josey Wales. I was/am a big Jonah Hex fan.

In a fit of triptifan-fuelled nostalgia last night, I dug my Jonah Hex comics out and resigned myself to the fact that yet another beloved childhood icon is gonna run the gauntlet--just like Hex had to do in an early issue-- via this new movie. I hope it does well, but I fear it won't resemble the comic. It never does, though.

Another artist I worshipped as a kid was George Perez, who dazzled me with the Teen Titans and especially his work with the JLA. Particularly issues #195-197. I was always fascinated with the Earth-1/Earth-2 concept.

And who mourns for Dick Dillin? He died (50 years old) in 1980. I was a bit late to the title so I missed the incredible run of this criminally-overlooked artist, but I've been impressed by his stellar run on the title.

And my goodness, does anyone remember Firestorm? He enjoyed a short-lived renaissance in the early-80s.

 
 Posted:   Nov 27, 2009 - 9:18 AM   
 By:   Gary S.   (Member)

I remember Dick Dillon and his lengthy run on JLA, it was good stuff and a refreshing departure from Mike Sekowsy who preceded him. Although I like Sekowsky too. What is it about comic artists dying way too young? Michael Turner, Dave Stevens, Don Newton, Dillon of course....

 
 Posted:   Nov 27, 2009 - 9:31 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

What is it about comic artists dying way too young? Michael Turner, Dave Stevens, Don Newton, Dillon of course....

I remember when Gene Day died at age 31. I was stunned by it. He did beautiful work for Marvel's Master of Kung Fu. I remember reading a lettercol and the term "late Gene Day" was used. My jaw dropped. I had a hard time with an artist I admired dying so suddenly and so young.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gene_Day

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 30, 2009 - 9:02 AM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)



Every Death is Untimely Department:

Your bringing up Gene Day’s impressive tenure



on



brought back and evoked many fond mem’ries, as we feel his tenure on the strip is second only
to Paul Gulacy’s via inventive layouts and dynamic drawing.



He was a solid and substantial talent who remains mucho missed



yet momentous legacy continues to triumph

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 30, 2009 - 10:06 AM   
 By:   The Man-Eating Cow   (Member)

What, no love for Jose Luis Garcia Lopez?

He's one of my personal favorites. I loved his work on THE BRAVE AND THE BOLD, and so many other DC titles.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 30, 2009 - 10:51 AM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)



You Were Sayin’??????? Department:





Howsomever, the artisan we’d most an appreciation across the (um) board













is this extraordinary gent:



As to that, what was everyone’s reaction to this senses-shatterin’ opus –



No tickets needed, just waltz on in and let ‘er rip

 
 Posted:   Nov 30, 2009 - 12:19 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Neo: Gene Day's death was the first time I learned of a comic book creator's death. I was affected by it a lot. Funny, but seeing that picture of him and how youthful he looks; he's baby-faced! Back then, I always imagined him looking like Reed Richards with the distinguished, graying hair at the temples. Heck, both guys were "Mr. Fantastic" as far as I was concerned. frown

BTW, why the heck is this thread for StevenJ? He's nowhere to be found here! wink

 
 Posted:   Mar 28, 2010 - 10:36 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Comics luminary Dick Giordano has died, age 77:

http://www.comicsbeat.com/2010/03/27/rip-dick-giordano-1932-2010/


Comics lost a giant with the passing this morning of Dick Giordano, a former Executive Editor at DC and an influential inker who helped shape the look of Bronze Age comics and usher in a new era of talent.

Giordano’s career included work at Charlton, Dc and Continuity Associates, the studio run by Neal Adams. As Adams’ inker on such much admired works as Batman and Green Lantern/Green Arrow, Giordano’s techniques influenced a generation of inkers, including Terry Austin, Bob Layton, Al Milgrom, Joe Rubinstein, and Bob Wiacek, essentially setting the tone for the entire Bronze Age of comics.


Giordano was equally important as an editor. At Charlton, he helped create and revamp their line of characters. That feat got him a job at DC. During his first stint there, from 1967-1970, he helped usher in a more modern era of comics storytelling with books such as Bat Lash and Manhunter, and helping to bring in the first wave of new talent to DC Comics since the Golden Age. After leaving to go to Continuity, he came back to DC in 1981 and continued at VP/Executive Editor from 1983 until 1993, where he oversaw such epochal events as the maturation of the Direct Market, limited rights for creators, the publication of Watchmen and Dark Knight and the establishment of the Vertigo line. While Giordano was not the originator of these changes, along with Jenette Kahn and Joe Orlando, he helped usher in the first truly modern era of comics.

He was much admired as a a line editor — one who supports and advises without heavy-handedness.

Giordano retired from DC in 1993, partly due to hearing loss that made working in an executive capacity difficult. However, he continued to draw and ink and was a familiar figure at conventions, and an important mentor and confidante for some of comics’ most important creators of the period. In recent years, he had suffered from leukemia and was hospitalized last week.

 
 Posted:   Mar 28, 2010 - 11:58 AM   
 By:   Gary S.   (Member)

Comics luminary Dick Giordano has died, age 77:

http://www.comicsbeat.com/2010/03/27/rip-dick-giordano-1932-2010/


Comics lost a giant with the passing this morning of Dick Giordano, a former Executive Editor at DC and an influential inker who helped shape the look of Bronze Age comics and usher in a new era of talent.

Giordano’s career included work at Charlton, Dc and Continuity Associates, the studio run by Neal Adams. As Adams’ inker on such much admired works as Batman and Green Lantern/Green Arrow, Giordano’s techniques influenced a generation of inkers, including Terry Austin, Bob Layton, Al Milgrom, Joe Rubinstein, and Bob Wiacek, essentially setting the tone for the entire Bronze Age of comics.


Giordano was equally important as an editor. At Charlton, he helped create and revamp their line of characters. That feat got him a job at DC. During his first stint there, from 1967-1970, he helped usher in a more modern era of comics storytelling with books such as Bat Lash and Manhunter, and helping to bring in the first wave of new talent to DC Comics since the Golden Age. After leaving to go to Continuity, he came back to DC in 1981 and continued at VP/Executive Editor from 1983 until 1993, where he oversaw such epochal events as the maturation of the Direct Market, limited rights for creators, the publication of Watchmen and Dark Knight and the establishment of the Vertigo line. While Giordano was not the originator of these changes, along with Jenette Kahn and Joe Orlando, he helped usher in the first truly modern era of comics.

He was much admired as a a line editor — one who supports and advises without heavy-handedness.

Giordano retired from DC in 1993, partly due to hearing loss that made working in an executive capacity difficult. However, he continued to draw and ink and was a familiar figure at conventions, and an important mentor and confidante for some of comics’ most important creators of the period. In recent years, he had suffered from leukemia and was hospitalized last week.



It is hard to think of Batman without Giordano's inks over Neal Adam's pencils. Additionally his own pencil and ink work on Black Canary among others. A real loss to the comics world as well as to his family.

frown

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 18, 2010 - 11:09 AM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)











 
 Posted:   May 7, 2010 - 11:32 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

This comic--THE SPECTRE #8--used to reside on the "mylar wall" of a local comic book store--no longer extant--and when they had their going out of business sale, I finally bought it from the nearly-empty wall...after five years of it staring at me! Why no one plucked this baby at 70% off is beyond me. Yes, I bought it for the cover! smile Nick Cardy is the cover artist for this 1969 issue.

Too bad The Spectre was never really developed; he certainly *looked* interesting.

 
 Posted:   May 10, 2010 - 6:22 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Crap! I had no idea that artist Marshall Rogers died in 2007! This was a guy who was billed as the next big thing during the 1970s, with his rendition of Batman taking the comic world by storm. I'm not sure that Rogers lived up to that impossible hype, but he was a bright star for a short time. His art has been described as a "post-Ditko Bauhaus style." That's a fine and accurate description.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marshall_Rogers

http://dccomicsartists.com/batman/BronzeAge.htm

C'mon you bastardos!!! Talk about comics!!! Talk about writing, talk about SOMETHING!!! mad wink

 
 Posted:   May 10, 2010 - 3:36 PM   
 By:   Gary S.   (Member)

With the passing of Frank Frazetta, it should be pointed out that he drew for DC in the 1950s.

 
 
 Posted:   May 10, 2010 - 4:59 PM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)





We weren’t aware of Mr. Rogers’ passing, either (well, at least not that one).



And, yes, no doubt his crowning achievement will be his run on the Caped Crusader; twould be well to remember that all the Herculean hype accompanying his remarkable artwork wasn’t self-perpetrated (ala the expected Byrne-bast) but a result of his particularly striking artistic take on things. Actually, we never quite saw the comparisons to Neal Adams; aside from their sleek, streamlined style, both artists are temperamentally and creatively their own unique expressions (like Mr. Rogers’ delectable Silver St. Cloud.





His work on many titles were a pleasure to behold,





As to that, with writer Roger Stern



Mr. Marshall’s responsible for pretty much our favorite run during 1981-82 (issues #48-53) for



It’s an utterly delicious sequence of events, chockfull of the expected cosmic grandeur and magnificent metaphors but also with a totally unexpected off-beat sensahuma that crops up when you least expect it.



He definitely made a mark that time won’t soon diminish.

 
 Posted:   May 10, 2010 - 7:11 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

The Marshall Rogers cover that I associate with him most is this classic story from Detective Comics #475 from 1978. The cover is by Rogers and that stalwart, make-every-artist-look-better inker, Terry Austin:

 
 Posted:   May 10, 2010 - 7:22 PM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)

The Marshall Rogers cover that I associate with him most is this classic story from Detective Comics #475 from 1978. The cover is by Rogers and that stalwart, make-every-artist-look-better inker, Terry Austin:



THE SECRET OF THE LAUGHING FISH is considered a late 70's Batman classic. I believe it's reprinted in the softcover BATMAN IN THE SEVENTIES.

 
 Posted:   May 10, 2010 - 7:25 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

THE SECRET OF THE LAUGHING FISH is considered a late 70's Batman classic. I believe it's reprinted in the softcover BATMAN IN THE SEVENTIES.

It's also included in the GREATEST JOKER STORIES EVER TOLD, which I also have.

I loved Batman in the '70s...early '80s--up to '84 wasn't bad, either.

 
 Posted:   May 10, 2010 - 7:32 PM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)

THE SECRET OF THE LAUGHING FISH is considered a late 70's Batman classic. I believe it's reprinted in the softcover BATMAN IN THE SEVENTIES.

It's also included in the GREATEST JOKER STORIES EVER TOLD, which I also have.

I loved Batman in the '70s...early '80s--up to '84 wasn't bad, either.


I started reading BATMAN in mid 1963 as a first grader when he was on the verge of cancellation; I saw the 1964 NEW LOOK appear (and I loved it) in second grade, and was there when the 1966 TV series turned the character into a buffoon in fourth grade. I was a stout fan, though, followed the character through the Neal Adams rebirth well into the late 70's.

 
 Posted:   May 10, 2010 - 8:12 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

THE SECRET OF THE LAUGHING FISH is considered a late 70's Batman classic. I believe it's reprinted in the softcover BATMAN IN THE SEVENTIES.

It's also included in the GREATEST JOKER STORIES EVER TOLD, which I also have.

I loved Batman in the '70s...early '80s--up to '84 wasn't bad, either.


I started reading BATMAN in mid 1963 as a first grader when he was on the verge of cancellation; I saw the 1964 NEW LOOK appear (and I loved it) in second grade, and was there when the 1966 TV series turned the character into a buffoon in fourth grade. I was a stout fan, though, followed the character through the Neal Adams rebirth well into the late 70's.


My Batman artist of choice is Jim Aparo, but there have been so many great ones...

 
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