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 Posted:   Sep 18, 2013 - 2:07 PM   
 By:   Warunsun   (Member)

I would choose the Wise Director's Edition or the original Theatrical cut. I like them both. The TV version runs too long for theatrical viewing and also has too many filler shots or "coverage" used.

I would like to get all three version on Blu-ray via seamless branching. I know this would costs some cash to prepare but "damn it bones, they did it for the original series!"

They spend the cash to do it for 79 episodes and a pilot but not for a major movie milestone. Very disappointing.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 18, 2013 - 2:17 PM   
 By:   Octoberman   (Member)

I would choose the Wise Director's Edition or the original Theatrical cut. I like them both. The TV version runs too long for theatrical viewing and also has too many filler shots or "coverage" used.
I would like to get all three version on Blu-ray via seamless branching. I know this would costs some cash to prepare but "damn it bones, they did it for the original series!"
They spend the cash to do it for 79 episodes and a pilot but not for a major movie milestone. Very disappointing.



Never say never! smile

 
 Posted:   Sep 19, 2013 - 5:06 AM   
 By:   Jeyl   (Member)

- I would like to get all three version on Blu-ray via seamless branching.

That doesn't sound very efficient. Seamless Branching usually works best if it's just dealing with additional footage or some slight cases of audio differences. Realistically, a seamless branching version of the "Special Longer Edition" would work very well in conjunction with the "Theatrical Version" since that's just added footage. The Director's Edition is more than just added footage. Some footage is trimmed, some switched from one place to another, and not to mention that you would essentially be using a completely different audio track than the ones that would be used in the previous two versions.

If Paramount was to release all three version of the film, it should be done in the same way way that Warner Bros. did with Blade Runner. Give "The Director's Edition" it's own disc. No branching, just a pure solid bona fide version of the film where the disc space is dedicated to it's presentation and not footage that isn't being used. Than have a second disc dedicated to the "Theatrical Version" and the "Special Longer Edition" via seamless branching using the same restoration work used to create the Director's Edition.

 
 Posted:   Sep 19, 2013 - 5:33 AM   
 By:   Jeyl   (Member)

- They spend the cash to do it for 79 episodes and a pilot but not for a major movie milestone. Very disappointing.

Since the remastering of TOS was done in 2006, the same year that CBS split from Paramount pictures, I'm not entirely certain that Paramount was responsible for the endeavor. If you watch any of the behind the scenes material, all the film restoration and new visual effects were done in-house at CBS and not Paramount studios. Since then CBS has been handling the complete restoration of all TNG episodes to the point that they are literally re-editing every episode from scratch and only now decided to do the remaining three seasons in-house rather than sending them off to other studios. The new bonus material is some of the best Bonus Features ever created for a TV series.

Compared to CBS, Paramount's work in presenting Star Trek in High Definition is downright criminal. All the restoration work on all the films are abysmal (TWOK has a blue filter that's equal to the Star Wars original trilogy blue filter), newly created special features were a joke (Throw some people who didn't work on the films to do commentary tracks, than cut their comments at random points to create lots of dead space) and the packaging was some of the worst ever designed.

The only BluRay that Paramount did right for Star Trek was JJ Abrams' Star Trek (2009), and that could mostly be attributed to Bad Robot doing all the work. When Paramount released STID, they took all the material Bad Robot made that could have been used to create a BluRay on par with Trek09's BluRya, but they decided to butcher it by spreading the special features across several "retailer exclusive" releases, including digital releases like iTunes. Not only do you not get a version of the film that presents more image when it uses Imax, you don't even get the marketing material like the trailers. That's on the Target Exclusive bonus disc incase you were wondering.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 19, 2013 - 7:01 AM   
 By:   Ado   (Member)

- They spend the cash to do it for 79 episodes and a pilot but not for a major movie milestone. Very disappointing.


Compared to CBS, Paramount's work in presenting Star Trek in High Definition is downright criminal. All the restoration work on all the films are abysmal (TWOK has a blue filter that's equal to the Star Wars original trilogy blue filter), newly created special features were a joke (Throw some people who didn't work on the films to do commentary tracks, than cut their comments at random points to create lots of dead space) and the packaging was some of the worst ever designed.

The only BluRay that Paramount did right for Star Trek was JJ Abrams' Star Trek (2009), and that could mostly be attributed to Bad Robot doing all the work. When Paramount released STID, they took all the material Bad Robot made that could have been used to create a BluRay on par with Trek09's BluRya, but they decided to butcher it by spreading the special features across several "retailer exclusive" releases, including digital releases like iTunes. Not only do you not get a version of the film that presents more image when it uses Imax, you don't even get the marketing material like the trailers. That's on the Target Exclusive bonus disc incase you were wondering.


@Jeyl

I mostly agree, although I would argue that TMP looks pretty fantastic on Blu-Ray, it is the best it has every looked, by far, and far superior to any cable or broadcast print quality The rest are hit and miss. I thought Search for Spock looked pretty good overall, it has a bluer color range in that film, which looks good. And Star Trek V looks pretty fantastic, the broad range of colors that Andrew Laszlo shot with look pretty good, the stuff in Yosemite looks really good and Nimbus 3 which was previously washed out browns look a lot better.

In the TNG set there are improvements over the DVD across the board - the best print is Nemesis, which looks really good with the color palette of grey and black and somewhat dark lighting and industrial set work. I think Nemesis looks great. I think that Paramount gave way to much power to JJ on making the home video material for ID. You are right it is a spit in the eye of the fan, I did the best thing and got the Target disc, by far the best version. I would say though that the print quality and sound quality on the Blu for this one is amazing. It is in fact visually clearer and brighter than the projected version I saw in the theater. Into Darkness is a reference level Blu-Ray.

 
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