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 Posted:   Jul 30, 2013 - 8:01 PM   
 By:   Zoragoth   (Member)



Tastes change, however, and I soon found his music too conservative, too placid. Not ravishing enough, not laden with enough VITALITY, etc. It's Scott's 'orchestral prowess', as you put it quite well, that appeals to me so much - the fact that he writes STUNNING themes is the icing on the cake!

Don't get me wrong - all this said - Barry's KONG is still *really* damn good!


Scott's melodic gifts never fail to amaze me! The talent and brilliance he lavished on unworthy projects like TIME OF THE WOLF and WICKER TREE as I mentioned in another thread, well, it gobsmacks me. Like Michelangelo doing frescos in an outhouse.

 
 Posted:   Jul 30, 2013 - 8:15 PM   
 By:   The Mutant   (Member)

Barry just sounds so plain, so uninspired, so conservative and unenthusiastic next to Scott's masterful handling of melody, counterpoint and orchestration.


 
 
 Posted:   Jul 30, 2013 - 8:16 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

Max Steiner, as played by Fred Steiner.

You can keep the others.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 30, 2013 - 8:41 PM   
 By:   bobbengan   (Member)

Scott's melodic gifts never fail to amaze me! The talent and brilliance he lavished on unworthy projects like TIME OF THE WOLF and WICKER TREE as I mentioned in another thread, well, it gobsmacks me. Like Michelangelo doing frescos in an outhouse.

Brilliantly put!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 30, 2013 - 8:42 PM   
 By:   bobbengan   (Member)

Barry just sounds so plain, so uninspired, so conservative and unenthusiastic next to Scott's masterful handling of melody, counterpoint and orchestration.




This gave me a good laugh.

I know, I know... I'm terrible... But... I am who I am!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 30, 2013 - 11:16 PM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)


Watch the last ten mins of KKL at the link below, including credits, and tell me this isn't really MUSIC. Those Ravelian, swirling woodwinds are amazing, and the timpani counterpoint at the onset of the end title is genius. I can't believe such inspired music could be penned for such a lousy movie!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=znuECQodI2o




Thanks for posting the link - and it is stunningly good music (what I could hear over the sound of my own raucous laughter; I doff my cap to anyone who can watch that ending with a straight face).

Not changing my opinion, though. smile

TG

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 30, 2013 - 11:16 PM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)


Watch the last ten mins of KKL at the link below, including credits, and tell me this isn't really MUSIC. Those Ravelian, swirling woodwinds are amazing, and the timpani counterpoint at the onset of the end title is genius. I can't believe such inspired music could be penned for such a lousy movie!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=znuECQodI2o




Thanks for posting the link - and it is stunningly good music (what I could hear over the sound of my own raucous laughter; I doff my cap to anyone who can watch that ending with a straight face).

Not changing my opinion, though. smile

TG

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 1:34 AM   
 By:   Dr Lenera   (Member)

I would say Steiner, then Barry, then Scott, in terms of personal enjoyment, but musically I'm tempted to say Scott's is the best of the lot. Sometimes favourite is not best...

Then again, being a Godzilla fan, I'm very partial to Akira Ifukube's two Kong efforts, especially the first, most of which was removed from the American edit of the film.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 2:54 AM   
 By:   Kari Tuhkanen   (Member)

No disagreement about Scott´s brilliant orchestrations and his magnificent achievement from me. If forced I´m sure Scott´s it would be then as a favorite, if only for the sumptuousness and splendor of it all; the sheer listenability aspect away from the images. Fortunately I don´t have to choose.

Steiner´s primal savageness is irresistible. After exactly 80 years, it´s still one of the absolute masterworks of film music. A Boat in the Fog is one of the great impressionistic moments of cinema, worthy of Debussy. Eerily haunting.

Barry dived into the psychology of the story with apparent ease and wrote one of the most beautiful love themes of the 70´s. The approach to the story is unique. The otherworldliness is awe-inspiring. The moment Jack rescues Dwan in the Skull Island while the strings rise to heights is breathtaking.

And Scott had such a drive that you have to make sure to grab good to your armchair not to fall from it while listening. It´s thrilling and dynamic beyond measure with its Holstian pounding. The last pages of the score contain some of the most haunting and lush jungle exotica you could ever possibly hear. It would make Ravel envious.

You choose then.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 4:18 AM   
 By:   Timmer   (Member)

Simple: Howard, by far

haha! ...and his 326 co-composers wink

I think JNH's score is pretty good, funnily enough his ominous Kong motif echoes Barry's. JB's is a far more unique and original score.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 4:26 AM   
 By:   Timmer   (Member)


Watch the last ten mins of KKL at the link below, including credits, and tell me this isn't really MUSIC. Those Ravelian, swirling woodwinds are amazing, and the timpani counterpoint at the onset of the end title is genius. I can't believe such inspired music could be penned for such a lousy movie!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=znuECQodI2o





Listening to Scott's score makes me want to listen to the real genius of Maurice Ravel who, with all due respect to Kari's comment two posts above, I doubt very much in any way shape or form would be envious. I like John Scott a lot but boy does he crib from the masters.

p.s. That film is for real!? eek I must see it, I MUST SEE IT!!!

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 5:39 AM   
 By:   Kari Tuhkanen   (Member)

You do realize, Timmer, I was praising Scott just to make a point? Of course you do. Scott would be the first to admit his debt to Ravel. Daphnis et Chloe is one of my all time favorite works. There are not many scores I would rather listen to than the complete ballet.

But cribbing from the masters, really? I would call it honoring the tradition. smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 7:54 AM   
 By:   Timmer   (Member)

Okay, I'm happy with that. cool

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 11:58 AM   
 By:   bobbengan   (Member)

You do realize, Timmer, I was praising Scott just to make a point? Of course you do. Scott would be the first to admit his debt to Ravel. Daphnis et Chloe is one of my all time favorite works. There are not many scores I would rather listen to than the complete ballet.

But cribbing from the masters, really? I would call it honoring the tradition. smile


Yea, "cribbing" this is not. He's using the same TECHNIQUE Ravel employed, a technique that was also used way previously in works like Strauss' ALPINE SYMPHONY...

Y'all gots ta learn to do ya homework!

 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 2:09 PM   
 By:   John Morgan   (Member)



A very important piece.

 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 2:17 PM   
 By:   Zoragoth   (Member)

No disagreement about Scott´s brilliant orchestrations and his magnificent achievement from me. If forced I´m sure Scott´s it would be then as a favorite, if only for the sumptuousness and splendor of it all; the sheer listenability aspect away from the images. Fortunately I don´t have to choose.

Steiner´s primal savageness is irresistible. After exactly 80 years, it´s still one of the absolute masterworks of film music. A Boat in the Fog is one of the great impressionistic moments of cinema, worthy of Debussy. Eerily haunting.

Barry dived into the psychology of the story with apparent ease and wrote one of the most beautiful love themes of the 70´s. The approach to the story is unique. The otherworldliness is awe-inspiring. The moment Jack rescues Dwan in the Skull Island while the strings rise to heights is breathtaking.

And Scott had such a drive that you have to make sure to grab good to your armchair not to fall from it while listening. It´s thrilling and dynamic beyond measure with its Holstian pounding. The last pages of the score contain some of the most haunting and lush jungle exotica you could ever possibly hear. It would make Ravel envious.

You choose then.


Wonderful post.

You're right, they are all fabulous works. But it's like the Desert Island Disc list, we all love to debate merits, don't we? For my part, I never tire of listening to any of these, and I also love Ifukube and much of the JNH score.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 3:12 PM   
 By:   Octoberman   (Member)

Steiner and Ifukube. Tied.

 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 3:15 PM   
 By:   ToneRow   (Member)

HONG KONG UN ADDIO by Gino Marinuzzi, Jr. smile

http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=93956&forumID=1&archive=0

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 4:27 PM   
 By:   Kari Tuhkanen   (Member)

No disagreement about Scott´s brilliant orchestrations and his magnificent achievement from me. If forced I´m sure Scott´s it would be then as a favorite, if only for the sumptuousness and splendor of it all; the sheer listenability aspect away from the images. Fortunately I don´t have to choose.

Steiner´s primal savageness is irresistible. After exactly 80 years, it´s still one of the absolute masterworks of film music. A Boat in the Fog is one of the great impressionistic moments of cinema, worthy of Debussy. Eerily haunting.

Barry dived into the psychology of the story with apparent ease and wrote one of the most beautiful love themes of the 70´s. The approach to the story is unique. The otherworldliness is awe-inspiring. The moment Jack rescues Dwan in the Skull Island while the strings rise to heights is breathtaking.

And Scott had such a drive that you have to make sure to grab good to your armchair not to fall from it while listening. It´s thrilling and dynamic beyond measure with its Holstian pounding. The last pages of the score contain some of the most haunting and lush jungle exotica you could ever possibly hear. It would make Ravel envious.

You choose then.


Wonderful post.

You're right, they are all fabulous works. But it's like the Desert Island Disc list, we all love to debate merits, don't we? For my part, I never tire of listening to any of these, and I also love Ifukube and much of the JNH score.


Thanks. I´m not a JNH fan, but his King Kong has some good stuff. I haven´t heard Ifukube. The Son of Kong is also wonderful as PFK reminded us in the earlier post. Runaway Blues for example, is such a charming piece.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 31, 2013 - 4:34 PM   
 By:   OnyaBirri   (Member)

Max Steiner as played by Fred Steiner.

This is my go-to version.

 
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