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 Posted:   Oct 20, 2011 - 12:31 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

MOMENTARY LAPSE is a beautiful album (I don't really hear anything 'sturm und drang' about it....that description would go to some of their more wild stuff, like certain tracks on UMMAGUMMA), and I play it quite often.

The Waters sound used to be my favourite PF sound, but in later years I've veered more and more towards the Gilmour sound that is all over LAPSE. His last two solo albums (ON AND ISLAND and METALLIC SPHERES with The Orb) have been absolutely bliss!

I also still think Hans Zimmer must have been inspired by the Gilmour sound when he did THELMA & LOUISE, just as Haycock utilizes some of the same guitar tricks. There's a lot of "Let's Get Metaphysical" in it.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 20, 2011 - 1:03 PM   
 By:   Octoberman   (Member)

MOMENTARY LAPSE is a beautiful album (I don't really hear anything 'sturm und drang' about it....that description would go to some of their more wild stuff, like certain tracks on UMMAGUMMA), and I play it quite often.


I think what I was getting at was that sort of stereotypical 80's type of sound where everything seems to be over-the-top dramatic. Huge drums, huge guitars, huge bass, huge synth... everything HUGE. Of course, the album isn't COMPLETELY awash with that sort of production technique... it has plenty of quiet, subtle moments, too. The "hugeness" is probably what Gilmour was referring to, IF the interview is to be believed. Regardless, I would never want anything subtracted... it is what it is. As you put it, beautiful.

Funny you'd mention "Ummagumma". I've been paying that one more attention lately, too. I still love "Grantchester Meadows" as much as I ever did. And "Sysyphus" gets better every passing year (but I may be subconsciously biased by the sad knowledge that we won't get any more music from RW). "The Narrow Way" is still Gilmour finding his voice--not bad at all. I even have a lot of fondness for "Grand Vizier". Good, trippy stuff.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 20, 2011 - 2:39 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

UMMAGUMMA is definitely trippy, yes! But each suite has its own set of things to enjoy for different reasons.

If there's anything in PF's catalogue that sounds huge, I would have picked Waters' stuff myself.

But I get what you mean. Gilmour often paints with broad strokes which gives many of the tracks an almost film music-like quality.

 
 Posted:   Oct 29, 2011 - 9:10 AM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

UMMAGUMMA is definitely trippy, yes! But each suite has its own set of things to enjoy for different reasons.

If there's anything in PF's catalogue that sounds huge, I would have picked Waters' stuff myself.

But I get what you mean. Gilmour often paints with broad strokes which gives many of the tracks an almost film music-like quality.


Terminal Frost is indeed the ultimate film music track.

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 29, 2011 - 3:11 PM   
 By:   Octoberman   (Member)

UMMAGUMMA is definitely trippy, yes! But each suite has its own set of things to enjoy for different reasons.

If there's anything in PF's catalogue that sounds huge, I would have picked Waters' stuff myself.

But I get what you mean. Gilmour often paints with broad strokes which gives many of the tracks an almost film music-like quality.


Terminal Frost is indeed the ultimate film music track.



Yep, "Terminal Frost" is a really good example. Back when AMLOR was brand new, I was blown away at how cinematic "Yet Another Movie" is. I'm still blown away by it. The part just before the guitar break, where the really deep synths come in--followed by those massive drums... it's just spinetingling. My JBL's get a fantastic workout!

(I remember thinking how cool it would be if it had been used on "Miami Vice". I can't believe they never used it. Or "One Slip", for that matter. Both those tunes had such a great "Vice-y" groove to them.)

 
 Posted:   Nov 5, 2011 - 6:34 AM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)

UMMAGUMMA is definitely trippy, yes! But each suite has its own set of things to enjoy for different reasons.

If there's anything in PF's catalogue that sounds huge, I would have picked Waters' stuff myself.

But I get what you mean. Gilmour often paints with broad strokes which gives many of the tracks an almost film music-like quality.


Terminal Frost is indeed the ultimate film music track.



Yep, "Terminal Frost" is a really good example. Back when AMLOR was brand new, I was blown away at how cinematic "Yet Another Movie" is. I'm still blown away by it. The part just before the guitar break, where the really deep synths come in--followed by those massive drums... it's just spinetingling. My JBL's get a fantastic workout!

(I remember thinking how cool it would be if it had been used on "Miami Vice". I can't believe they never used it. Or "One Slip", for that matter. Both those tunes had such a great "Vice-y" groove to them.)


Remember, Yet Another Movie was co-written with part-time film composer Pat Leonard, so no wonder it had certain cinematic qualities.

I agree those songs would have been great in Miami Vice.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 5, 2011 - 6:18 PM   
 By:   Octoberman   (Member)

Remember, Yet Another Movie was co-written with part-time film composer Pat Leonard, so no wonder it had certain cinematic qualities.


Agreed. Pat Leonard has written his share of really good, film-y stuff, no question. "Live To Tell" and "Oh Father" are STUNNING. But to my mind, PF already had a ton of work under their belt that was wonderfully cinematic.

Those guys really are wizards.

Anyone else remember that Vice episode about Castillo, and they used "Hello Earth" from Kate Bush? That was AMAZING.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 5, 2011 - 8:39 PM   
 By:   JSWalsh   (Member)

"Childhood's End" has been running neck-and-neck with Gilmour's "On An Island" (song) as most-played song on my itunes lately.

 
 Posted:   Nov 5, 2011 - 9:24 PM   
 By:   Miles (MerM)   (Member)

Not a huge fan by any means (not disinterested, just haven't gone through the catalog), but I love Dark Side dearly. I bought that, Wish You Were Here and The Wall recently. I still have to go through the latter two.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 6, 2011 - 1:17 PM   
 By:   Octoberman   (Member)

"Childhood's End" has been running neck-and-neck with Gilmour's "On An Island" (song) as most-played song on my itunes lately.


"Childhood's End" is a great track. Good call. Whenever Gilmour gets into a funk over criticism of his own writing chops, he should remember tracks like this.

 
 Posted:   Nov 18, 2011 - 9:05 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Their song "Time" has been dogging me for the past week! Had it stuck in my mind and then heard it from the start on the radio en route to work! Pink Floyd's never been a band that I've warmed to, but I really like "Time."

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 18, 2011 - 9:07 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Their song "Time" has been dogging me for the past week! Had it stuck in my mind and then heard it from the start on the radio en route to work! Pink Floyd's never been a band that I've warmed to, but I really like "Time."

Yes, it's a fine song.

Alan Parsons Project's "Time" is a wonderful song too:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2fTKhZIH2oU

 
 Posted:   Mar 6, 2014 - 9:54 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I was impressed with the music score for this 1978 documentary on Surrealist painter René Magritte and lo and behold, the music is credited to Roger Waters. Was it written for the film or is it merely Pink Floyd music attached to it?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KNHNWTqiE8I

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 6, 2014 - 10:04 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

No idea. I hadn't even heard of that before. Thanks for the tip.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 6, 2014 - 11:17 AM   
 By:   Octoberman   (Member)

Magritte is one of my all-time favorites.

I've got to sit down and go through that doc one of these days. I knew it existed but didn't know someone uploaded it to YouTube.

There is some (but not much) documentation on Waters' score here:
http://www.hokafloyd.com/CD2/ATFS/A_TREE_FULL_OF_SECRETS%20.htm

 
 Posted:   Mar 7, 2014 - 5:30 AM   
 By:   Jehannum   (Member)

Respecting David Gilmour more & more as a guitar player.

 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2014 - 3:26 AM   
 By:   Thomas   (Member)

A somewhat random question perhaps, but can someone tell me the name of the Pink Floyd song that Andrew Lloyd Webber’s ‘Phantom of the Opera’ number sounds very similar to? I remembering hearing it some years ago, and being shocked at how much they sounded alike.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2014 - 5:16 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Hmmm....never heard about any such similarity, I'm afraid.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 8, 2014 - 8:51 AM   
 By:   Octoberman   (Member)

Waters was referring to the resemblance of the 5-note descending motif in the intro of Lloyd Webber's "Phantom" title song and the similar descending 5 notes in the guitar refrain in "Echoes".

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 10, 2014 - 3:06 PM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

If you want to watch a monochromatic telefilms produced in 1972,
go order Mycènes, music by The Pink Floyd.

They tracked some scenes with four albums:
The Piper at the Gates of Dawn (1967), A Saucerful of Secrets (1968), Meddle (1971) and the live Ummagumma (1969).

 
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