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This is a comments thread about FSM CD: TV Omnibus: Volume One (1962-1976)
 
 Posted:   Aug 26, 2010 - 2:12 PM   
 By:   Jeff Eldridge   (Member)

Those were the colors in the stylized main title for "The Men," the umbrella program under which many of the "Assignment: Vienna" episodes aired:

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 26, 2010 - 4:43 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Is there a way to listen to samples continuously? It's very difficult to listen to five discs' worth of cues with individual clicks.

Very easy, actually. Use Firefox and download the freeware FoxyTunes. Works like a champ.


Simple. Just change browsers and download and install new software. Yet at Intrada, I can "play all" without doing any of that.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 26, 2010 - 7:30 PM   
 By:   quiller007   (Member)

WOOOOHOOO! Now we're talkin'! I used to watch ASSIGNMENT VIENNA
way back in '72. The other two shows that were part of THE MEN were
THE DELPHI BUREAU (with Laurence Luckinbill) and JIGSAW (with
James Wainwright). I remember recording the theme from AV
onto my small tape recorder by holding the mic to the tv speaker.
Great to see ALL of this stuff finally getting released. A really
BIG THANKYOU to Lukas and everyone at FSM for this nice surprise.
ORDERED!

Any chance of releasing Dominic Frontiere's beautiful music for SEARCH
(another seemingly forgotten classic tv show from 1972)? WB owns
it, I believe. I also wish these shows would get released on dvd.

Den

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 27, 2010 - 1:32 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Any chance of releasing Dominic Frontiere's beautiful music for SEARCH
(another seemingly forgotten classic tv show from 1972)? WB owns
it, I believe. I also wish these shows would get released on dvd.

Den


"Search has an interesting history. It began as a television movie called "Probe." Here are the main titles for the TV film:



When it was decided to convert the film into a series, NBC found that PBS was already airing a weekly program called PROBE, so the series was dubbed SEARCH, and when the TV movie re-aired as the pilot of the TV show, the credits for it were shortened and redone to use the SEARCH title, as in the version seen here:



And here are the main titles for the regular weekly series:

 
 Posted:   Aug 27, 2010 - 10:35 AM   
 By:   Jeff Eldridge   (Member)

Simple. Just change browsers and download and install new software. Yet at Intrada, I can "play all" without doing any of that.

There is also a FoxyTunes add-on for IE:

http://www.foxytunes.com/ie/download/

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 27, 2010 - 12:43 PM   
 By:   CindyLover   (Member)

When it was decided to convert the film into a series, NBC found that PBS was already airing a weekly program called PROBE, so the series was dubbed SEARCH

And when it was shown in the UK on BBC1, they called it Search Control in the Radio Times for no apparent reason (see also Ironside becoming A Man Called Ironside and more recently Amazing Stories getting called Steven Spielberg's Amazing Stories).

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 27, 2010 - 1:11 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Simple. Just change browsers and download and install new software. Yet at Intrada, I can "play all" without doing any of that.

There is also a FoxyTunes add-on for IE:


I've been doing some experimenting, and I found an alternate method for IE. In my WINAMP player (www.winamp.com), I go to the browser tab and open up the web page for the CD. This automatically puts all of the sound clips into a playlist that appears at the bottom of the screen. I just hit the PLAY button on the bottom, and all of the clips play in sequence. I'm so glad I found this.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 27, 2010 - 5:03 PM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)


I've been doing some experimenting, and I found an alternate method for IE. In my WINAMP player (www.winamp.com), I go to the browser tab and open up the web page for the CD. This automatically puts all of the sound clips into a playlist that appears at the bottom of the screen. I just hit the PLAY button on the bottom, and all of the clips play in sequence. I'm so glad I found this.


Huh, never knew Winamp could do that. Thanks for the tip.

 
 Posted:   Aug 29, 2010 - 1:23 PM   
 By:   Dana Wilcox   (Member)

Mine arrived yesterday, though I didn't have a chance to listen to it until today. So I'm only about 3/4 of the way through the first disc now. So far -- home run! Early "Johnny" Williams score from an episode of the Kildare spin-off "The Eleventh Hour". The sound on this one may not please the audiophiles, but the music is excellent, including a beautiful piano theme for the main character (a troubled young girl played by Elizabeth Montgomery). The sound quality of the Leonard Rosenman tracks for the 1974 "Phantom of Hollywood" is remarkable however, as the growling brass and orchestral color just leap right out at you. If the rest is, and sounds, this good, this set will be getting quite a lot of play over the next few weeks.

 
 Posted:   Aug 29, 2010 - 9:49 PM   
 By:   RR Aitken   (Member)

I have made it up through the first few cuts of disc 4 "Then Came Bronson" and the box is great.
I suggested a few months ago in a thread that it would be sweet to have Grusin's "It Takes a Thief", and "Name of the Game"....
I'm hoping that an FSM Vol 2 of either TV Omnibus or Lalo Schifrin Film Scores might contain Lalo's "How I Spent My Summer Vacation". "Search" was a fun show to watch - I remember when the show was in its original run, one day as a goof, I wore a Singer sewing machine bobbin on a string as an inexpensive prop to school to mimic the small circular hi-tech device used by Hugh O'Brian (and possibly other cast members) on the show. I got some laughs -always go for the prop.

 
 Posted:   Sep 4, 2010 - 11:03 AM   
 By:   JackDVD78@gmail.com   (Member)

I got my set yesterday, still haven't had a chance to take it all in.

I uploaded into iTunes the CD Information for Discs 4 + 5. Seems those were not found in their database as of that time. Hopefully I did the information justice. Some may tweak some of the information possibly.

I know this may be considered a pricy set for some, I hope it is around long enough for those who really want a copy to have one. I will say as many CD scores I may have regretted not purchasing because of a sell out, this would be the worst decision ever for this release. This set is a treasure trove and the sound quality is really top notch.

Just to have more music from Gil Mellé, and Billy Goldenberg is icing on the cake. I will say those who love Dave Grusin's work such as YAKUZA should jump at this set.

If I had one CD set to pick to be lost on an island with, this is hands down the set! I wonder how many years this set took to release? I can't wait for a Volume 2 set.

also the Cover Art is so cool. Well done. Cover art for compilation CDs can be tricky for some and come across generic looking or just cheap. Cover art used for this set is gold. The layout overall design, CD artwork etc. I love it. (Then again I am a sucker for this period of scoring)

 
 Posted:   Sep 16, 2010 - 1:12 PM   
 By:   Frank DeWald   (Member)

Warner Archive is currently offering THEN CAME BRONSON, EARTH II and THE DEADLY TOWER in their 30% off sale: http://www.wbshop.com/Warner-Archive/ARCHIVE,default,sc.html

 
 Posted:   Sep 16, 2010 - 3:13 PM   
 By:   pooter   (Member)

My set arrived today, but I cant open it yet as it's a Birthday present from my wife. So have to wait until the 23rd Sept before I can dive in.

In the meantime I downloaded all the samples into Itunes and so am able to listen to all the snippets. Which is a substantial amount of music in itself. It sounds fantastic.

I wonder how it's selling?

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 16, 2010 - 3:46 PM   
 By:   James MacMillan   (Member)

Mine arrived yesterday, though I didn't have a chance to listen to it until today. So I'm only about 3/4 of the way through the first disc now. So far -- home run! Early "Johnny" Williams score from an episode of the Kildare spin-off "The Eleventh Hour". The sound on this one may not please the audiophiles, but the music is excellent, including a beautiful piano theme for the main character (a troubled young girl played by Elizabeth Montgomery). The sound quality of the Leonard Rosenman tracks for the 1974 "Phantom of Hollywood" is remarkable however, as the growling brass and orchestral color just leap right out at you. If the rest is, and sounds, this good, this set will be getting quite a lot of play over the next few weeks.


It's Rosenman, alright - after listening to it you have "bomp-bomp-bomp-bomp" going on in your head for ages! (But I love it!).

 
 Posted:   Sep 16, 2010 - 5:35 PM   
 By:   Ag^Janus   (Member)

I like the George Duning and Jerry Fielding particularly. ASSIGNMENT VIENNA started getting a bit long in the tooth, then I started to enjoy it more. Gil Melle is welcomed.

I pretty much went on the named talent when ordering this, I'm hoping the next volume will have a collection of carefully selected material.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2010 - 12:05 PM   
 By:   Lester Sullivan   (Member)

Disc One: The gorgeous stereo version of the Goldsmith-Rugolo song "Three Stars Will Shine Tonight," adapted from the "Dr. Kildare" series theme, is what first attracted me to this set. Jerry rules. (Everybody needs to get the incomparable FSM issues of "Dr. Kildare" and "Cain's Hundred." Don't you realize how fortunate we are to have these early-sixties gems?) The Johnny Williams music for "The Eleventh Hour" series episode gives us another relatively rare listen at early-sixties scoring. Marvelous tunes, actual melodies. Rosenman's well-remembered "The Phantom of Hollywood" disappointed a bit, rather a sameness running through it, not unlike loud-loud-loud "Prophesy," which also was something of a letdown. Harsh without much letup, but well recorded. The Don Ellis "The Deadly Tower" was a letdown, too, rather similar to the Rosenman and lacking a lot of the jazz-funk flavor of Ellis's movie scores. It tends to drone (shades of today's scoring). The George Romanis jazz for "Assignment: Munich" is pretty much a throwaway.

Disc Two: Not so the Grusin for "Assignment: Vienna." I haven't been collecting this composer; I'll have to reevaluate that decision. This swings and has effective sequencing from longer straight-ahead jazz cuts to shorter dramatic cues, many full flavored with funk-rock vibes. Wow, this outdoes even Frontiere. Lengthy and probably the best thing in the whole "Omnibus" (read grab bag).

Disc Three: Can't honestly claim that the John Parker music for the same series is even faintly on the same level, more like "Cimbalom CHiPs." That Austro-Hungarian instrument is used to far greater effect by Grusin. Parker just drags it in peripherally from time to time. Grusin uses this, along with electric harpsichord and the like, to give the series vital local color as effective as Earl Hagen's in "I Spy." Parker always seems merely to be visiting the whole AfAm thing, Grusin sounds like the actuality. The Parker scores are brilliantly played, spot one, at fast tempos, slick, slick, slick, but everything has a glassy glare and an undoubtedly unintended insincerity. The beloved Parker cheesiness just sounds glib here. The Grusin better bears repetition and closer examination. Would that TV scoring only aspire to such heights today! Don't trash Fielding for using the overexposed Harlem Globetrotters whistled version of "Sweet Georgia Brown" in his score for the even-now-remembered "Shirts/Skins" TV movie. He probably was required to use it. He usually gets it out of the way fast, following with his own superior funky variations. Has any other comedy score ever started so stentorially as Fielding's snare drum assault? A great accompaniment to the recent limited edition of his "The Black Bird" comedy score.

Disc Four: "Then Came Bronson," and, with "BIG screen"-style scoring like Duning's, we're not likely to forget it. Motorcycle-driving star Michael Parks, the much-touted Adam in the Toshiro Mayuzumi-scored "The Bible," discovered in an allegedly-long worldwide search, a sort of latter-day James Dean substitute, may have mumbled his way through Bronson's scenic series, but Duning doesn't. In a box set in which more Euro-oriented orchestral stylings jostle cheek to jowl with funkified big band, the Duning-scored TV movie pilot and subsequent episode scores provide the most orchestral sound on offer. At first, I found the title theme to be sectional and under-characterized. That was before I heard seemingly-endless clever variation upon variation, proving that the composer knew exactly what he was doing by providing a theme that seemingly goes off in at least three different directions one phrase after the other. Now, no one surpasses me as a Gil Melle fan, but his contribution to "Bronson" appears to have preceded his greater experimentation and comes across as under-detailed and quotidian in comparison to the superior mastery of the Hollywood veteran Duning. There are passages in Duning's score for the pilot that easily could pass for ones in "Picnic" and "Bell, Book, and Candle." That's high praise for TV music, and, boy, does the Duning MOVE, real road trip stuff, the Melle not so much so.

Disc Five: What a disappointment! I at first wondered why FSM would dump this Schifrin here, rather than use it in their first, wonderful Schifrin box or save it for a second volume. After some forty minutes of the relentlessly-alternating drones and ostinati of "Earth II," which so sadly predict our current state of scoring, hardly relieved by the wan funkifications of the opening and closing credits, with their insipid and poorly produced electronic inserts, I was anxious to bail out of this expensive-for-its-day and, according to the reports, boring space opera. "Earth II" would have stunk up the first Schifrin box. For me, this composer is a supreme mimic with a variable output, and I wouldn't have chosen this particular score. With Schifrin, you have to be a little selective. I developed a strong curiosity about Billy Goldenberg from his score in one of the "Amazing Stories" boxes. This one for the "High Risk" TV pilot-cum-movie doesn't come off as immediately distinctive as that one, but, still, when there is so little of this composer's always-interesting work available, one shouldn't carp.

All and all, a valuable TV grab-bag Volume One (1962-1976) and something of a bargain on the basis of per-disc cost, showing the sometimes greater jazz-funk-rock-pop vein in TV as compared with some theatrical movies of the time. Hope Volume Two doesn't start with 1977 but, rather, goes backward for more sixties and, maybe, even fifties goodness. Predicting a deserved sellout in the near future

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2010 - 2:56 PM   
 By:   Graham S. Watt   (Member)

Loved that, Lester! Just as well I ordered it before I read your review! Looking forward especially to Gil Mellé's "quotidian" tracks!

I'll get back with my own ramblings when this finally arrives.

 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2010 - 4:18 PM   
 By:   Lukas Kendall   (Member)


Just wanted to say I really enjoyed reading the comments about the different scores on this set!

Lukas

 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2010 - 4:45 PM   
 By:   mark ford   (Member)

I'm dying to get this set, hopefully in a few weeks. Just listening to the samples has been totally cool for me so I know I'll really love delving more deeply into the offerings. This is just the kind of thing that makes film/TV music still exciting for me. There is so much treasure out there yet to be unearthed and that spirit of discovery is a real boost of vitality.

Thanks Lukas!

 
 Posted:   Oct 4, 2010 - 12:17 PM   
 By:   SchiffyM   (Member)

Will the online notes be up for the remaining CDs anytime soon?

 
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