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 Posted:   Jun 18, 2013 - 3:19 PM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

Zimmer, tries to approach each score with a serious and open minded attitude.
Take for example alan Silvestri, who i think is terrific. He is going to write an Alan Silvestri score for whatever film he works on.
Zimmer approaches each score with a dramatic sensibility. Wheter he comes up with an inspired score or not, his approach is refreshing
brm


I've never heard anything especially "inspired" in Zimmer music.

The best bit of music in "Gladiator", for instance, he said he drew from Wagner. I sensed that Wagnerian connection, but I admired the rhythmic drumbeats he incorporated into the music that accompanied the return to Rome of Commodus to claim his right to succeed his "murdered" father.

But...those drum beats weren't Zimmer's. They were the soul of that stretch of music and they are absent from the soundtrack.

Zimmer contributed soulless, emotionless drones. That's all I ever hear from him.

But DO champion him with every breath you take.

I'd also take any Silvestri score over Zimmer.

 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2013 - 3:23 PM   
 By:   YOR The Hunter From The Future   (Member)

Zimmer, tries to approach each score with a serious and open minded attitude.
Take for example alan Silvestri, who i think is terrific. He is going to write an Alan Silvestri score for whatever film he works on.
Zimmer approaches each score with a dramatic sensibility. Wheter he comes up with an inspired score or not, his approach is refreshing
brm


I've never heard anything especially "inspired" in Zimmer music.

The best bit of music in "Gladiator", for instance, he said he drew from Wagner. I sensed that Wagnerian connection, but I admired the rhythmic drumbeats he incorporated into the music that accompanied the return to Rome of Commodus to claim his right to succeed his "murdered" father.

But...those drum beats weren't Zimmer's. They were the soul of that stretch of music and they are absent from the soundtrack.

Zimmer contributed soulless, emotionless drones. That's all I ever hear from him.

But DO champion him with every breath you take.

I'd also take any Silvestri score over Zimmer.


Not to mention that the best part of "Gladiator" score, that piece that play at the end of the battle in the movie's begining, was stolen note-by-note from Morricone's "Secret of the Sahara".

Very inspired, indeed!

 
 Posted:   Jun 18, 2013 - 5:18 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

Bite me!

 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2013 - 5:30 AM   
 By:   Scott M (Oldsmith)   (Member)

Music changes, preferences alter, and sooner or later what is popular falls out of favor. Today's way of film scoring will change and there will be supporters and bashers of that method as well. Personally, as long as a score isn't dull and meandering, I enjoy it. I've heard some great music from Hans Zimmer and some deadly dull cues from Jerry Goldsmith. I don't feel that film scoring has turned to shit as a whole, nor do I feel a movie needs to have themes (memorable or otherwise) in order to be successful. As long as they help make the proper emotional connection in the film, they do the job. Having a listenable CD is secondary, which is why (in them olden days), separate, rerecorded albums would be commissioned with "suites" and concert versions (John Williams was a master at the soundtrack album - Goldsmith not so much).

I do find it tougher to get into newer scores because I no longer do blind buys (except for Star Trek). I have to hear them either in samples on websites or in the films themselves, which is ideal so I know what the composer intended. The problem is, I don't spend a lot of time watching movies and most of them have the music buried in the sound mix.

On one hand, I miss the days I had to run out and buy an armfull of score. On the other, it's a relief because I can no longer afford to do that. :-)

 
 Posted:   Jun 19, 2013 - 6:00 AM   
 By:   WillGoldNewtonBarryGrusin   (Member)

Scores have changed because movies have changed. Less quiet spaces, lyrical moments and a leisurely pacing - more speed, action, rushing through setpieces.

Only if movies change the scores will change.

 
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