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 Posted:   Sep 29, 2013 - 9:14 PM   
 By:   Bob Bryden   (Member)

1. Ben-Hur
2. Lawrence of Arabia
3. The Alamo (Tiomkin)
4. 7th Voyage of Sinbad
5. Spartacus
6. How the West Was Won
7. The Greatest Story Ever Told
8. The Guns of Navarone
9. Field of Dreams
10. The Great Escape

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 29, 2013 - 9:37 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

I believe 10 out of about 45 responses has listed PSYCHO-60- IN THEIR TOP 10, that's about 23%

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 29, 2013 - 9:48 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

BEN HUR, comes in at 9 choices.

 
 Posted:   Sep 30, 2013 - 1:47 AM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

deleted

 
 Posted:   Sep 30, 2013 - 9:29 AM   
 By:   Loren   (Member)

You should also ask for your Top Ten least favorite.

- THE GODFATHER - ROTA
- MIDNIGHT EXPRESS - GORE
- THE SOCIAL NETWORK - REZNOR/ROSS
- ROUND MIDNIGHT - HANCOCK
- BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN - SANTAOLALLA
- THE DARK KNIGHT X3 - ZIMMER AND HOWARD
- FAME - GORE
- SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE - RAHMAN
- BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID - BACHARACH
- THE TALENTED MR. RIPLEY - GABRIEL YARED

(YES, most of my least favorite are Oscar winners and that might be why.)


I don't agree on almost anything in the above red list.
Not even on The Talented Mr. Ripley, which is finest work by Yared plus beautiful songs (there's a fantastic Fiorello's performance). The Social Network is best synth score of recent years. The Godfather is simply amazing etc. etc. etc. I will not even enter the Zimmer dabate to avoid flaming this thread (since I consider The Dark Knight the best film score ever of last five years).

By the way, Midnight Express is by Moroder.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 30, 2013 - 4:07 PM   
 By:   dariusparker   (Member)

1. Batman (Danny Elfman)

2. Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (James Horner)

3. Rambo: First Blood Part II (Jerry Goldsmith)

4. Gremlins (Jerry Goldsmith)

5. Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (Jerry Goldsmith)

6. Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (Cliff Eidelman)

7. Predator (Alan Silvestri)

8. Goldfinger (John Barry)

9. The Amazing Spider-Man (James Horner)

10. Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back (John Williams)

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 1, 2013 - 4:58 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

I've been thinking a lot about this, and have come up with a list of ten (okay, and some reserves) where I think the score works especially well with the film. These aren't in any order, nor are necessarily my "favourite" scores, but they all sprang to mind when pondering the original question. And I've tried to spread it around a bit, because quite honestly I could easily pick ten Morricones or ten Barrys.

The Alamo - Tiomkin
Indelibly imprinted on my memory from an early age, I've only actually seen the film a couple of times (would buy a remastered bluray in an instant) - but Tiomkin hits it perfectly, with some slightly corny songs vastly outweighed by glorious battle music, the kind that could make you want to invent a time machine and fight shoulder to shoulder with the defenders, were the proposition not so shut-ended.

Mic Macs - Beau
A lovely, clever film with a quirky and typically French score without going all April in Paris. Impossible to imagine without the musical interludes both original and otherwise. It manages to out-Amelie Amelie, and I love that film.

The Legend of 1900 - Morricone
A jewel of a film, with a great cast and impeccable direction. Nothing of any significance occurs without a spell-binding piece of music to accompany it, from the first sight of America, to the meeting of the two main characters, to a story of hopeless love, and above all the piano duel that forms the centrepiece of this little masterpiece.

The French Connection - Ellis
A grating, off-kilter, ear-offending jazz-based score underpinning the brutal world of drugs and frustrated cops - wonderful!

Sleuth - Addison
Caine and Olivier try to out-fox each other in an English country house setting against the fussy, tuneful and infectious Addison score. Very much under-rated, like much of Addison (does Ahem still lurk here? He hated Addison smile ) and for me it makes the film endlessly watchable.

There - the first five. More to follow.

TG

 
 Posted:   Oct 1, 2013 - 5:33 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

1. The Mechanic (Jerry Fielding)

Fielding scores not an action movie, but the Bronson character Arthur Bishop.

2. The Yakuza (Dave Grusin)

I go on and on about it here:

http://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=71226&forumID=1&archive=0

3. The Conversation (David Shire)

4. Point Blank (Johnny Mandel)

5. Dirty Harry (Lalo Schifrin)

6. Klute (Michael Small)

7. The Eiger Sanction (John Williams)

8. Dances with Wolves (John Barry)

9. Hour of the Gun (Jerry Goldsmith)

10. The Seven Ups (Don Ellis)

 
 Posted:   Oct 1, 2013 - 9:58 AM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

Re: BEN HUR, comes in at 9 choices.

I think it's interesting to consider all the nominees in 1959:

AL CAPONE - David Raksin
BEN-HUR - Miklos Rozsa
DARBY O'GILL AND THE LITTLE PEOPLE - Oliver Wallace
THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK - Alfred Newman
THE HANGING TREE - Max Steiner
THE LAST ANGRY MAN - George Duning
THE NUN'S STORY - Franz Waxman
ON THE BEACH - Ernest Gold
PILLOW TALK - Frank DeVol
SOME LIKE IT HOT - Adolph Deutsch

I took the above from an article posted here about nominated movies, although, with 10 listed, perhaps those were the final 10 considered before the actual nominations. Sorry, but not sure about that. [But I'm sure someone will quickly correct me if I'm wrong!] It's an interesting group, and while I've always loved Miklós Rózsa's thrilling score for the winning "Ben-Hur," it's intriguing to see David Raksin and Alfred Newman and Franz Waxman and Ernest Gold among those being considered that year.

 
 Posted:   Oct 1, 2013 - 4:44 PM   
 By:   davel   (Member)

Top Ten (15 – oops) Scores that work well for the film

These scores really helped define each film. It’s hard to imagine any of them without the character of the music and the mood created. In no particular order here’s my subjective list:

THIRD MAN - Karas
MAGNIFICENT SEVEN - Bernstein
WHERE EAGLES DARE - Goodwin
WAIT UNTIL DARK - Mancini
NORTH BY NORTHWEST - Herrmann
ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST - Morricone
DEAD AGAIN - Doyle
HIGH NOON - Tiomkin
GLADIATOR - Zimmer
BIG COUNTRY - Moross
BODY HEAT - Barry
PLANET OF THE APES - Goldsmith
PASSAGE TO INDIA - Jarre
HOME ALONE - Williams
GET CARTER - Budd

If nothing else, this thread goes to show that without a great music score watching movies just wouldn’t be the same. smile ?

 
 Posted:   Oct 1, 2013 - 4:52 PM   
 By:   Loren   (Member)

THIRD MAN - Karas

at last somebody with good head upon his shoulder!

 
 Posted:   Oct 1, 2013 - 4:53 PM   
 By:   Jason LeBlanc   (Member)

I like your list. Just kidding - I LOVE your list.

Thanks Fun Guy. I like all the scores on your list too, with the exception of Children of Dune, which I have never heard before. Is that the Brian Tyler score to the TV movie?

It was actually hard to narrow my list down to 10 - Coming up with a top 30 or 40 would be easy I think, but for the ultimate top 10 I just closed my eyes and pictured the scores I can listen to endlessly without getting sick of, and are good all the way through.


I promise Children of Dune will be right up your alley. I happen to have an extra copy that I'll send to you. If you want, shoot me a mailing address at thatguyjedi at hotmail.com and I'll send it to you ASAP.

-Paul



Paul, that is very kind of you. Email sent!

 
 Posted:   Oct 1, 2013 - 5:29 PM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)

The Sea Hawk
Ben-Hur
El Cid
Gunfight at the OK Corral
Adventures of Don Juan
The Alamo
Spartacus
Planet of the Apes
Rebecca
The Big Country

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 2, 2013 - 5:05 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

I've been thinking a lot about this, and have come up with a list of ten (okay, and some reserves) where I think the score works especially well with the film. These aren't in any order, nor are necessarily my "favourite" scores, but they all sprang to mind when pondering the original question. And I've tried to spread it around a bit, because quite honestly I could easily pick ten Morricones or ten Barrys.

The Alamo - Tiomkin
Indelibly imprinted on my memory from an early age, I've only actually seen the film a couple of times (would buy a remastered bluray in an instant) - but Tiomkin hits it perfectly, with some slightly corny songs vastly outweighed by glorious battle music, the kind that could make you want to invent a time machine and fight shoulder to shoulder with the defenders, were the proposition not so shut-ended.

Mic Macs - Beau
A lovely, clever film with a quirky and typically French score without going all April in Paris. Impossible to imagine without the musical interludes both original and otherwise. It manages to out-Amelie Amelie, and I love that film.

The Legend of 1900 - Morricone
A jewel of a film, with a great cast and impeccable direction. Nothing of any significance occurs without a spell-binding piece of music to accompany it, from the first sight of America, to the meeting of the two main characters, to a story of hopeless love, and above all the piano duel that forms the centrepiece of this little masterpiece.

The French Connection - Ellis
A grating, off-kilter, ear-offending jazz-based score underpinning the brutal world of drugs and frustrated cops - wonderful!

Sleuth - Addison
Caine and Olivier try to out-fox each other in an English country house setting against the fussy, tuneful and infectious Addison score. Very much under-rated, like much of Addison (does Ahem still lurk here? He hated Addison smile ) and for me it makes the film endlessly watchable.

There - the first five. More to follow.

TG


As you're all clamouring for the next five, here they are:

The Satan Bug - Goldsmith
Yes, you did read that correctly, Goldsmith. An early work, not only does the score eerily reflect the threat of world obliteration, but manages to make you forget the uneasy transition of the original story from leafy Oxfordshire to Californian desert. I like this brand of Goldsmith and am not ashamed to say so.

About Schmidt - Kent
Watched the film on a rented DVD, bought the CD the next day. This simple but affecting score perfectly conveys a descent into post-retirement bewilderment. Nicholson's deadpan delivery is enhanced 100% by the insistent and versatile themes that Rolfe came up with.

The Thomas Crown Affair - Legrand
Despite the fame of "Windmills of Your Mind", it's the secondary theme "His Eyes, Her Eyes" that does the heavy lifting on this score, most notably for the sexiest chess game ever. You can't separate the music form the visuals - well, you can and the music is stilll superb, but the visuals would suffer irreparably.

Thunderball - Barry
If you had to pick just one Bond score to illustrate the brilliance of Barry's 007 scores, there are several to choose from - but I pick this one. The underwater music defines how this kind of scene should be scored, the action music, the cool of Mr KKBB and the moments where they cross over show why the Bond series might have fizzled out at the end of the 1960s without John Barry's contributions.

Battle of Algiers - Morricone
For a nearly five decades-old film to have just as much relevance as it did when it was new is astonishing. The music as heard on disc is haunting and always leaves me wanting much more, but when you hear it as part of the film, the effect is little short of stunning. The dsic doesn't in fact include the hammering sound effect that underpins the brutal ambiguity of the message, and I don't know if that's a Morricone sound or a Pontecorvo one. Regardless, this is a film that, if you haven't seen it, you're missing out on a valuable lesson both in history and current events.

I mentioned a few reserves in part one of this list. Without going into why I esteem them so much, they are:

Dracula - Kilar
Ratatouille and The Incredibles - Giacchino
AI - Williams
Where Eagles Dare - Goodwin.

TG

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 2, 2013 - 10:37 AM   
 By:   Eugene Iemola   (Member)

My two cents:

Bride of Frankenstein
The Lost Horizon
Henry V
The Devil and Daniel Webster
Ben Hur
The Big Country
To Kill A Mockingbird
Planet of the Apes
The Godfather Part II
Chinatown

 
 Posted:   Oct 4, 2013 - 10:11 PM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

To Arthur Grant:

Re: Hello,
I am preparing an article for my website and would like to hear what readers think are their top film scores for what they contributed to the films they were composed for rather than for the more subjective listening experience on their own. My main reason for asking is because I do not want to overlook anything (especially something I haven't seen) readers here might feel is important. If anyone participates I thank them in advance and feel free to make comments next to your selections.


Arthur, I still think you should go back to your first posting, which started this, and emphasize that which I have made bold above. The title of the piece gives one impression, but then if we read the original instructions, we discover that you wanted something else, and obviously a lot of people posting their favorite soundtracks here, even from the first page, haven't read that it's a bit more complicated than they may have realized. Just a thought.

And I want to single out Vangelis' amazing score for Chariots of Fire, which I watched last night, and was so knocked out by it that I started a new thread on just that and how it was a startling juxtaposition, with a story set in 1923 and 1924 with electronic music from an entirely different era. But what a great job they did combining them!!!

 
 Posted:   Oct 7, 2013 - 6:47 PM   
 By:   davel   (Member)

THIRD MAN - Karas

at last somebody with good head upon his shoulder!


A forgotten classic that I've seen several times. The music creates a perfect mood and fits the film so well. Maybe not everyone's cup of tea but truly unique and memorable.

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 18, 2013 - 1:23 AM   
 By:   arthur grant   (Member)

Hello all,
Just letting you all know that I've finally started my list with a brief introduction for The Cinema Cafe website which can be viewed here:

http://thecinemacafe.com/the-cinema-treasure-hunter?category=Top%20Ten%20Treasures

Thanks to all who contributed to this topic.

--Arthur

 
 Posted:   Nov 21, 2013 - 6:22 AM   
 By:   orbital   (Member)

BEN-HUR (Miklós Rózsa, 1959)
BULLITT (Lalo Schifrin, 1968)
IL BUONO, IL BRUTTO, IL CATTIVO (Ennio Morricone, 1966)
GET CARTER (Roy Budd, 1971)
GIÙ LA TESTA (Ennio Morricone, 1971)
THE GREAT ESCAPE (Elmer Bernstein, 1963)
LAWRENCE OF ARABIA (Maurice Jarre, 1962)
NORTH BY NORTHWEST (Bernard Herrmann, 1959)
THE SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION (Thomas Newman, 1994)
TARAS BULBA (Franz Waxman, 1962)

 
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