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 Posted:   Dec 24, 2012 - 7:01 PM   
 By:   Michael24   (Member)

Just watched the 1984 TV film of A Christmas Carol with Scott last night. (Hard to believe it was a TV movie. They used to be made with such care and quality.) It remains my favorite traditional adaptation of the story. It's such a wonderful production, and I can just imagine how gorgeous it would look with a real remastering for Blu-Ray. Terrific score, a great supporting cast, and of course Scott is absolutely fantastic as Scrooge. I love it.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 25, 2012 - 10:35 AM   
 By:   Foodman   (Member)

Just watched the 1984 TV film of A Christmas Carol with Scott last night. (Hard to believe it was a TV movie. They used to be made with such care and quality.) It remains my favorite traditional adaptation of the story. It's such a wonderful production, and I can just imagine how gorgeous it would look with a real remastering for Blu-Ray. Terrific score, a great supporting cast, and of course Scott is absolutely fantastic as Scrooge. I love it.



I could not have said it better myself Michael. Scott was a great one! It is very sad that neither "A Christmas Carol", nor "The List Of Adrian Messenger" soundtracks remain unreleased. They are two holy
grails I would love to have.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 25, 2012 - 11:40 AM   
 By:   Michael24   (Member)

Nick Bicat actually offers his score for A Christmas Carol on his website. At least it's available that way, but I would still love to see somebody like LLL do a release of the complete score.

http://www.nickbicat.com/

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 25, 2012 - 1:40 PM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)



See - This Is When It Becomes FSM ASSEMBLED in Shared Awareness Department:



Mucho transcendent thanx, Mike, for that heretofore unknown but now wonderful knowledge
that Mr. Bicat's marvelously atmospheric and moving score is available in some format.



Can't recall if it was Emmy nominated in 1984 when it first aired but it durn dang sure shoulda
been ... from singular start to fabulous finish - a harmonious classic. smile

cool cool

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 25, 2012 - 6:20 PM   
 By:   Foodman   (Member)

Nick Bicat actually offers his score for A Christmas Carol on his website. At least it's available that way, but I would still love to see somebody like LLL do a release of the complete score.

http://www.nickbicat.com/


Michael, you just provided me with a very special Christmas gift. I wanted A Christmas Carol for so long. I had no idea Nick Bicat made it available. Many, Many Thanks! Have a very Happy New Year!


Barry

 
 Posted:   Dec 25, 2012 - 8:32 PM   
 By:   Eric Paddon   (Member)

It's such a wonderful production, and I can just imagine how gorgeous it would look with a real remastering for Blu-Ray. Terrific score, a great supporting cast, and of course Scott is absolutely fantastic as Scrooge. I love it.

I watched the Blu-Ray release the other night and it looks like it was remastered. It's certainly MUCH better than the old DVD release, and it also fixes a glitch that was present on the old release when Scroogge is walking back to his chambers and the ghostly hearse is coming from behind him. This is when we first hear Marley's voice calling out to him and he stops in the street and asks who's calling him, but on the old DVD release we didn't hear the sound of Marley's voice!

The Blu-Ray has an in-motion menu with the theme music too, as opposed to the static silent menu on the old release.

To me, this ranks as the best film version of the story next to the 1951 Alastair Sim classic (Director Clive Donner was film editor on that version). In some parts it improves on that (the Sim version inexplicably left out the scene of Scrooge meeting the two gentlemen again and giving his new pledge to the poor) but overall it finishes just behind IMO. Scott's interpretation is certainly different and not typical of how Scrooge is performred, but it works.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 25, 2012 - 8:58 PM   
 By:   Michael24   (Member)

I watched the Blu-Ray release the other night and it looks like it was remastered.

Interesting. I've read some reviews of the Blu-Ray, and they all seemed to suggest it wasn't remastered and looked little to no different from the DVD.

This is when we first hear Marley's voice calling out to him and he stops in the street and asks who's calling him, but on the old DVD release we didn't hear the sound of Marley's voice!

I've read about that error. My DVD contains Marley's voice in both the hearse and doorknocker scenes, so I must have a later release that corrected that.

To me, this ranks as the best film version of the story next to the 1951 Alastair Sim classic (Director Clive Donner was film editor on that version).

I finally saw the Sim version last December. It was good, but I thought it was melodramatic and a little dry at times, and I don't quite buy Sim's transformation as much as I do Scott's. To me, it feels like Sim's Scrooge comes around at the end just because he's supposed to, whereas Scott's Scrooge feels like he comes around because he actually learns from his experience.

All in all, "A Christmas Carol" is a story I really like and I always enjoy seeing adaptations of it, whether they are traditional versions (like these) or modern day interpretations. Except for the musicals. I just can't get into it when they make it a musical for some reason.

 
 Posted:   Dec 25, 2012 - 9:20 PM   
 By:   Eric Paddon   (Member)

I never knew about a second DVD release so maybe there was a remastering done for that one. I can say that the Blu-Ray looks much better than the first DVD release if that's the frame of reference.

I think a musical version can be done effectively. I admit I only have two frames of reference, one being "Scrooge" which the more I watch it, the more I find myself not liking what I see. The score had some songs I enjoyed when I first saw it as a child and there is that sentimental feeling for it, but I think when it coms to "Scrooge" what really astonishes me is how I have never seen a version of "A Christmas Carol" that manages to completely strip out the whole heart and soul of the story. Albert Finney's Scrooge never really learns anything until he gets thrust into Hell (I HATE that scene!) because in Christmas Present, the only thing he learns how to do is get giddy with drink and loosen up at a party, and then in Christmas Yet To Come, for the sake of a cheap laugh he thinks he's being praised. Leslie Bricusse I have to say, had no business writing the script for this film because while he might be a talented songwriter he clearly had no understanding of what the story is about. On the other hand, I can see a good song like "I'll Begin Again" springing out of a good script and I can even envision "Thank You Very Much" as an appropriate song to take place for the scene when Bob Cratchit shows up late to work, hears his salary is being doubled and in his dumbfounded state can only say (begin song!).

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 28, 2012 - 12:20 PM   
 By:   ANZALDIMAN   (Member)

And let's not forget that George C. Scott also had a tremendous sense of humor.

Here he is being roasted by none other than the great Don Rickles. (The Scott stuff starts at about 3:30 into the video but the whole thing is just flat out hilarious.)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ut-1Ofy2vI&NR=1&feature=endscreen

big grin

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 28, 2012 - 2:38 PM   
 By:   Michael24   (Member)

And let's not forget that George C. Scott also had a tremendous sense of humor.

Here he is being roasted by none other than the great Don Rickles. (The Scott stuff starts at about 3:30 into the video but the whole thing is just flat out hilarious.)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ut-1Ofy2vI&NR=1&feature=endscreen

big grin


LOL!!! Thanks for posting that. Those classic roasts are so much funnier and classier that these new ones they do nowadays. The old ones were about friends poking good-natured fun at each other, while these new ones are just a group of hacks and has-beens trying to out-gross and out-cuss each other.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 28, 2012 - 9:48 PM   
 By:   ANZALDIMAN   (Member)

And let's not forget that George C. Scott also had a tremendous sense of humor.

Here he is being roasted by none other than the great Don Rickles. (The Scott stuff starts at about 3:30 into the video but the whole thing is just flat out hilarious.)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ut-1Ofy2vI&NR=1&feature=endscreen

big grin


LOL!!! Thanks for posting that. Those classic roasts are so much funnier and classier that these new ones they do nowadays. The old ones were about friends poking good-natured fun at each other, while these new ones are just a group of hacks and has-beens trying to out-gross and out-cuss each other.


Glad you enjoyed it Michael.

I posted it because it shows a different side of Scott than we normally got to see. And besides, not only was Rickles a laugh riot as usual, it was great seeing the familiar faces of some talented people that are no longer with us today.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 29, 2012 - 7:36 AM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)



[ I posted it because it shows a different side of Scott than we normally got to see...]



Aces-on astute awareness there, Anz - tho we'd respectfully add twas also because he
too often wasn't given the green light to spotlight his equally prodigious sensahuma.



That's why our favorite in this vein is what he pulled off in "Dr. Strangelove" - his was far and away the most
hilarious on view because - and this is key - by playing it absolutely STRAIGHT, he not accentuated but
highlighted the innate absurdity beneath not only his character but the entire acidic satire in the entire flick.

(Not surprisingly, he went on royal record saying his romp here was just about the most enjoyable fun
he ever had on a film).



As Mike Nichols (coming from the theatre and knowing how to helm actors) knew - and Stanley Kubrick
(coming solely from the left side of his brain roll eyes didn't) roll eyes - you don't 'Direct' someone like Mr. Scott ...



you simply generally guide and then specifically get the hell outta his way, thus allowing his already
unerringly supremely sharp, immaculately intuitive dramatic Instinct to home in on the Truth of the moment.



The unforgettable results speak for their transcendent selves, no? cool

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 20, 2013 - 3:46 PM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)



smile

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 21, 2013 - 6:38 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

I just love his showdown with MARLON BRANDO at the end of THE FORMULA-80--What was that line?- if I didn't have a son who loved me I would splatter your guts all over those curtains[something close to that]

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 21, 2013 - 7:54 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

MORRICONE:

Thanks for the spoiler shield.


Wow! I took 3 words out and I guess I'm okay now. Pretty late in the game, sorry. But if you have seen the film, those 3 words were pretty evident from the early portions of the film.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 21, 2013 - 8:15 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

I loved his intensity and his uncompromising dedication to his art.
And then I really LOVED when he, or any artist, would stretch himself as far from what he was known for as possible. Here are two such stretches that I was amazed he got away with, nay triumphed in:
The 3 absurd comedy turns he did in MOVIE, MOVIE! the third being the flying ace in this fake trailer:





and the romantic lead in JANE EYRE with a score by John Williams.


 
 
 Posted:   Jul 22, 2013 - 2:43 PM   
 By:   Ado   (Member)

I really like his version of Scrooge, perhaps as much as Patrick Stewart.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 22, 2013 - 5:03 PM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)



Duel of the Titans (but not Reeves & Scott wink) Department:



Can't quite recall where we first came across this anecdote, Dan-o, but someone once shared this unmeeting of thespic minds that happened on the set of this flick when Meester Bee's eccentric insistence of not learning his lines and having cue cards placed all over the place elicited this paraphrased reaction from Meester Gee:

"Are you ever gonna say a line the same way twice, Marlon?"



To which the equally immediate utterly unfazed reply came:

"What difference does it make, George? You know a cue when you hear one."



Ah sewwwwwww ...

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 22, 2013 - 6:39 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

The biggest testament to Scott's talent is in how many directions this tribute has taken. You can come at his career in so many ways and be amazed. So after my little contribution I was astounded to see one of Scott's favorite roles was not mentioned, PETULIA.

Not only is it my favorite Richard Lester film.

It has one of my top 5 John Barry scores, frankly maybe my favorite.

It was cinematographer was Nicholas Roeg who became an amazing director himself.

Edited by Anthony Gibbs whose editing style made TOM JONES, PERFORMANCE, JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR and FIDDLER ON THE ROOF so unique.

Whenever anyone asks me a movie that encapsulates the 60s I point to it every time.

And when asked which role was his favorite, Scott would come back to the character of Archie Bollen again and again as the role closest to what he was himself in real life (coming in second he mentioned ISLAND IN THE STREAM). It is a film where Spencer Tracy-like I never caught him acting. I thought he was great in many of his roles, but this one was transcendent.








 
 
 Posted:   Jul 25, 2013 - 10:24 AM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)



Two Real (and Reel) Life Truthful Tapestries of His Triumphant Tragedies Department:



An unsparing account by this talented theatre writer of their over quarter-century
liaison (and out-of-wedlock child).



A no-holds-honestly-unbarred overview of the tempestuous titan's odyssey behind and in front of stage and screen. They may have the unvarnished effect of readjusting your perspective re his private behavior or enhancing your admiration for his professional expertise.

Either way, you ain't gonna emerge from either the same way you went in.

Don't say we didn't warn ya ... eek

 
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