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 Posted:   Aug 4, 2012 - 12:50 PM   
 By:   Hadrian   (Member)

Hans Holbein The Younger (1497/98–1543)
Sir Thomas More, dated 1527

The detail in Holbein's painting is amazing!

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2012 - 4:42 PM   
 By:   Gordon Reeves   (Member)

Mucho obligo, Ango, fer da identification that lovely Eva
(accidentally, we hope) left out.

We're profoundly partial to many of Magritte's incredibly imaginative, vibrantly visionary expressions
("The Large Family", down below, as a singular example for impressive extortion).



And speaking of DETAIL, Had, flemish master Jan Van Eyck will absolutely blow ya away with his
mesmerizingly exact durn near encyclopedic representations (with literally every dang image
depicted being wholly symbolic with religious overtones as to what they represented in his society),
such as "Arnolfini's Wedding" (1434) ...

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2012 - 5:13 PM   
 By:   Angelillo   (Member)

Mucho obligo, Ango, fer da identification that lovely Eva
(accidentally, we hope) left out.


My pleasure but...did you mean you hope Eva "is accidentally lovely" or "Eva accidentally left out the identification" ?!

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2012 - 5:48 PM   
 By:   Angelillo   (Member)

Incidentally, and inspired by Ray Faiola's post, I must admit my favorite painting has been for years the following one...



I was 12 years old when I first saw it (08/19/1983) and it stroke me...

 
 Posted:   Aug 4, 2012 - 6:06 PM   
 By:   Josh Mitchell   (Member)

Hans Holbein The Younger (1497/98–1543)
Sir Thomas More, dated 1527

The detail in Holbein's painting is amazing!


That truly is amazing, and the color scheme is dominated by my favorites. Great pick.

 
 Posted:   Aug 5, 2012 - 4:33 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I was 12 years old when I first saw it (08/19/1983) and it stroke me...

Ang, we're nearly the same age (born 08/22/71 here). Which is surprising because you post so much...older...than I do.

 
 Posted:   Aug 5, 2012 - 3:01 PM   
 By:   Eva   (Member)

fer da identification that lovely Eva
(accidentally, we hope) left out.


Sorry and thanks for the compliment wink



"L'Empire des Lumiéres" by Magritte.

 
 
 Posted:   Aug 7, 2012 - 3:16 PM   
 By:   Gordon Reeves   (Member)



Georgia O'Keeffe - “Black Abstraction” (1927).



[ “The way you see nature depends on whatever has influenced your way of seeing.” ]


 
 Posted:   Aug 17, 2012 - 5:12 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Self Portrait, 1889- Vincent Van Gogh (1853-1890)



I love Van Gogh's work, but not always his renderings of people. However, after seeing his 1889 self portrait in person recently, I was nearly moved to tears by it. His eyes piercing for all eternity. I couldn't stop staring at this painting. Everything else I looked at afterwards was great, but anti climactic after having seen the Van Gogh. I couldn't shake this vision from my head.

One really needs to see works of art in person. It will often blow your mind with how magnificent these paintings truly are.

 
 Posted:   Aug 17, 2012 - 5:20 AM   
 By:   Thomas   (Member)

I have always loved Aaron Shikler's oil portrait (1970) of President Kennedy that hangs in the White House. I have a nice gold framed print of it in my hall which my wife bought for me at Christmas a couple of years ago.
(No political offence intended).

 
 Posted:   Aug 17, 2012 - 6:10 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Nu de Dos, 1902- Pablo Picasso (1881-1973)



I immediately fell in love with this one.

 
 Posted:   Aug 29, 2012 - 6:00 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

L'eternelle Idole, 1889- Auguste Rodin, 1840-1917.



It's a sculpture, not a painting, but I don't care. It's ART. Sensual and beautiful.

 
 Posted:   Aug 29, 2012 - 10:21 PM   
 By:   Michael Scorefan   (Member)



This is also one of my favorite pantings. I have loved it ever since I saw the original at the Tate in London. I bought a print, and I have been captivated by it ever since.

Some more modern paintings that I enjoy are by Michael Whelan, including his work on Elric



and for Lovecraft:



and

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 17, 2012 - 7:03 AM   
 By:   Gordon Reeves   (Member)

smile

wink Now, admittedly, this is a sneaky bit of subtle-as-a-matrix-a-bomb subtlety, but - lacking yon conventional artist
to credit - we still gotta say it's one of the gol-danged most CREATIVEly artistic collages evah. Thus, if'n yu don't
cotton to it, too durn dang bad, so there - nyahhhhh! razzrazzrazz

smilewinkbig grin

 
 
 Posted:   Nov 9, 2012 - 10:22 AM   
 By:   Gordon Reeves   (Member)



Alphonse Mucha (1860-1939)





smile wink

 
 Posted:   Jan 16, 2013 - 7:19 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

"Woman with Chignon" (1901). Pablo Picasso (1881-1973)

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 16, 2013 - 2:32 PM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

My favorite artist is John Atkinson Grimshaw. My favorite work by him is Lamplit Bridge. Apparently, it is extremely rare. I can find lots of works by Grimshaw on an internet search (I like most of them), I cannot find that one!

years ago I had a poster of his of a painting I bought at a gallery, I think it was a keyside at night in the wet, might have been liverpool, with all the lights in the windows. Loved that.

 
 
 Posted:   May 28, 2013 - 8:52 AM   
 By:   Gordon Reeves   (Member)



Charles Demuth - "I Saw The Figure 5 in Gold" (1928)



[ smile Und also note the affectionate homages within the painting to his valued friend, William Carlos Williams wink ]

 
 Posted:   May 29, 2013 - 4:50 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Thanks for the introduction to Charles Demuth, Neo.

 
 Posted:   Aug 5, 2013 - 7:40 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

"Self Portrait"- Pablo Picasso (1901)

 
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