Film Score Monthly
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
Search Terms: 
Search Within:   search tips 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2008 - 4:45 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

"I'M SHOCKED, SHOCKED.."

this was funny in CASABLANCA but every friggin'
"jourmalist" in America thinks he/she is the first one to quote it.

"Drugs in baseball? Im shocked, shocked"
"Corruption in politics? Im shocked, shocked!"

'scuse me while i retch.

 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2008 - 8:06 PM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

"[blank] does not exist in this dojo!"

What the hell? I've been seeing that one pop up EVERYWHERE lately. roll eyes

 
 Posted:   Jun 14, 2008 - 5:50 AM   
 By:   Mr. Jack   (Member)

Also "What happens in [blank] stays in [blank]."

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2008 - 6:19 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

"The International Community." Don't they mean "the world"? And why does the word "community" have to be added at the end of every social, ethnic, and racial group?

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2008 - 7:48 AM   
 By:   TominAtl   (Member)

"What up, G?"
"It's all good"
"Same 'ol, same 'ol"
"I'm feeling fair to partly cloudy"(what are you, a weather man?)

And from nearly every single news broadcast:

"And ______ is just looking for some closure". I HATE that phrase! If you are dealt with a tragedy, there is no closure. You grieve, and learn to live with it and continue on, but the pain will always be there. Closure says something like finishing a book. A dumb and inaccurate phrase.

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2008 - 8:39 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)


And from nearly every single news broadcast:

"And ______ is just looking for some closure". I HATE that phrase! If you are dealt with a tragedy, there is no closure. You grieve, and learn to live with it and continue on, but the pain will always be there. Closure says something like finishing a book. A dumb and inaccurate phrase.


And what about "passing away"? Remember the good old days when people just "died"?

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2008 - 10:47 AM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

The Bush administration gave us the word "robust" (obviously test marketed before being employed in public).

RUMSFIEld: "we have a ROBUST foreign policy"

pathetic

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2008 - 1:24 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

STARTING OFF EVERY SENTENCE WITH "basically....."

just suffered anexample before typing thisfrown

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2008 - 1:48 PM   
 By:   TominAtl   (Member)



And what about "passing away"? Remember the good old days when people just "died"?


I've always heard that too. It supposedly takes the sting out of saying, "Frank's dead, and he ain't NEVER coming back", and makes reference to "going to the other side" so in effect they're NOT dead.

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2008 - 2:58 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)



And what about "passing away"? Remember the good old days when people just "died"?


I've always heard that too. It supposedly takes the sting out of saying, "Frank's dead, and he ain't NEVER coming back", and makes reference to "going to the other side" so in effect they're NOT dead.


"passed on' is more in keeping with the feeling that the body is dead but the spirit lives on .

 
 Posted:   Jul 12, 2008 - 5:04 PM   
 By:   David Sones (Allardyce)   (Member)

The Bush administration gave us the word "robust" (obviously test marketed before being employed in public).

RUMSFIEld: "we have a ROBUST foreign policy"

pathetic


ROBUST should refer to cheese and nothing else.

 
 Posted:   Jul 13, 2008 - 1:52 PM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

's funny that this debate should arise on a film-music forum. One of those great put-downs on the artform is that 'film music relies too much on cliche.' You have to know the cliches in order to avoid them. So with language. I don't mind at all when someone says 'at the end of the day' etc. if it COMMUNICATES. What I think silly is people who ignore the pertinent content of an argument just BECAUSE someone said, 'at the end of the day' somewhere.

In fact a lot of this is second-hand pseud that people who wish to APPEAR sophisticated use to show they're 'original'. Originality is essential in the arts but not always in everyday speech. Oscar Wilde at the breakfast table would be terribly dull after a while.

Now a phrase I really dislike is that old Americanism, 'We have to talk'. When someone, especially a woman, says 'We have to talk', dive for the nearest foxhole, lock your shield over your head, and inject vaccines immediately, because it's NEVER a pleasant surprise.

 
 Posted:   Oct 22, 2009 - 8:44 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

"It is what it is"

 
 Posted:   Oct 22, 2009 - 8:46 AM   
 By:   David Sones (Allardyce)   (Member)

"It is what it is"

"This is true." (UGGGGG)

 
 Posted:   Oct 22, 2009 - 9:25 AM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

Another "it's gotta stop":

Folks, it's "I couldn't care less."

It's not "I could care less."

The phrase means you could not possibly care any less than you do. I COULD NOT CARE LESS...or, "I couldn't care less!"


The phrase "I could care less" carries no real meaning. It means you care some.

 
 Posted:   Oct 22, 2009 - 9:26 AM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

The Bush administration gave us the word "robust" (obviously test marketed before being employed in public).

RUMSFIEld: "we have a ROBUST foreign policy"

pathetic


ROBUST should refer to cheese and nothing else.



But...but...that's YUPPY-speak...like "woodsy".

 
 
 Posted:   Oct 22, 2009 - 9:27 AM   
 By:   neotrinity   (Member)



Balrog Bullyoracy Department:

“I’m so sick and tired of seeing gay threads”.



roll eyes



 
 Posted:   Oct 22, 2009 - 9:28 AM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

Manderley:

Referencing some of the phrases you mentioned that have drifted into history, I add the following:


"Hubba hubba"


big grin

 
 Posted:   Oct 22, 2009 - 9:29 AM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)



Balrog Bullyoracy Department:

“I’m so sick and tired of seeing gay threads”.



roll eyes




We all know what became of the Balrog, now don't we!

 
 Posted:   Oct 22, 2009 - 9:30 AM   
 By:   David Sones (Allardyce)   (Member)

Manderley:

Referencing some of the phrases you mentioned that have drifted into history, I add the following:


"Hubba hubba"


big grin


I'll never ever stop saying hubba hubba. It's a personal favorite. smile

 
You must log in or register to post.
  Go to page:    
© 2014 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.