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 Posted:   Dec 28, 2013 - 12:03 AM   
 By:   Josh Mitchell   (Member)

(Transplanting WILLIAMDMCCRUM and Mr Greg's comments on the word "curb" from davidinberkeley's "Stuff by the curb" thread...)

This is another of those Americanisms things from the other thread.

In the UK, we'd spell it 'kerb'.


Yup, and "Curb" is something that is done to enthusiasm.



My great-grandmother (1910-1994), who was originally from Wichita, Kansas, USA, called it a "curbin." I always thought that was strange until much later when realized it was Midwestern-speak for "curbing," which is uncommon nowadays but still accurate:

curb·ing (kûrbng)
n.
1. The material used to construct a curb.
2. A row of curbstones; a curb.
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/curbing

She also slept with her head on a "pilla" and asked me to wash her "windas" from time to time, bless her heart.

Another American anomaly seems to be putting the punctuation mark that follows a quoted word or phrase that finishes a clause or sentence inside of the closing quotation mark rather than outside (see my first two sentences above).

In other words, you like "tomato", and I like "tomato."

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 28, 2013 - 6:50 AM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)

Well I had a quick look through the thread & I don't think this has come up...The Rest Room. What's that all about? It's a toilet, a place where you pee & poo, a perfectly normal activity. I can understand calling it a bathroom (even if there's no bath in there). Did Al Bundy take that big plunger into the loo for nothing?

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 28, 2013 - 10:35 AM   
 By:   eriknelson   (Member)

Well I had a quick look through the thread & I don't think this has come up...The Rest Room. What's that all about? It's a toilet, a place where you pee & poo, a perfectly normal activity. I can understand calling it a bathroom (even if there's no bath in there). Did Al Bundy take that big plunger into the loo for nothing?

And Canadians call it the washroom.

 
 Posted:   Dec 28, 2013 - 4:42 PM   
 By:   DOGBELLE   (Member)


IT's all garbage to me

Australia:
Garbage collector
Garbageman
Garbo
Garbologist (jocular)
Jockey or Runner (helper)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
British Isles:
Dustbin man
Bin man
Rubbish man
Midden man
Dustman[3]
Refuse collector
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
North America:
Garbageman
Garbage collector
Trash collector
Trashman
Recycling Tech
Toter Tipper
Sanman (Sanitation Man)
Green Machine
Notable waste collectors

 
 Posted:   Dec 28, 2013 - 9:10 PM   
 By:   Mr Greg   (Member)

You can add into the "British Isles" segment of that post - Environmentally Friendly Engineer, though that fell out of favour quite quickly, mainly because it is stupid.

Midden Men? New one on me!

 
 Posted:   Dec 30, 2013 - 4:43 AM   
 By:   Ray Faiola   (Member)

There's a terrific MGM John Nesbitt PASSING PARADE short called "American Spoken Here". It identifies the origin of many American slang expressions. Watch your P's and Q's was originally Watch your pints and quarts, with which tavern owners would admonish their customers who became unruly after too much ale.

 
 Posted:   Dec 30, 2013 - 6:45 AM   
 By:   Recordman   (Member)

Ray, years ago I had read that the origin of the phrase was based on early manual typesetting in a printer's shop, so that an apprentice would not mistakenly reverse the two letters.

[startquote from Ray Fiola]There's a terrific MGM John Nesbitt PASSING PARADE short called "American Spoken Here". It identifies the origin of many American slang expressions. Watch your P's and Q's was originally Watch your pints and quarts, with which tavern owners would admonish their customers who became unruly after too much ale.

 
 Posted:   Dec 30, 2013 - 6:51 AM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

It's all garbage to me

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
British Isles:
Dustbin man
Bin man
Rubbish man
Midden man
Dustman[3]
Refuse collector
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Old joke based on this:

UK garbage collector ('bin-man') calls at a newly arrived US immigrant's door. She has forgotten to leave out her garbage. She takes a long time to open the door:

"Where's your bin, madam?"

"I's bin to de bathroom: where's YOU been, nosey parker?"

 
 Posted:   Dec 30, 2013 - 6:57 AM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

UK : 'gaol'

US; 'jail'.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 30, 2013 - 7:27 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)


Old joke based on this:

UK garbage collector ('bin-man') calls at a newly arrived US immigrant's door. She has forgotten to leave out her garbage. She takes a long time to open the door:

"Where's your bin, madam?"

"I's bin to de bathroom: where's YOU been, nosey parker?"




"No, madam, where's your wheeley bin?"

"I's REALLY bin to the bathroom!"

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 30, 2013 - 1:48 PM   
 By:   Doug Raynes   (Member)

I'm surprised that no one has mentioned:

My bad;

which is grammatical nonsense and makes me seethe with hatred every time I see it.

How has it come about? What's wrong with the word mistake?

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 30, 2013 - 3:18 PM   
 By:   Nicholas_DW   (Member)

Can I add my own confusing Americanism in? "Gas"...it's not "Gas", it's Petrol...so why "Gas"?

It's just short for "gasoline".

 
 Posted:   Dec 30, 2013 - 3:37 PM   
 By:   RoryR   (Member)

When did "Cheers" replace "thank you" in the UK?

 
 Posted:   Dec 30, 2013 - 3:48 PM   
 By:   Josh Mitchell   (Member)

I'm surprised that no one has mentioned:

My bad;

which is grammatical nonsense and makes me seethe with hatred every time I see it.

How has it come about? What's wrong with the word mistake?




Your love and pity doth the impression fill
Which vulgar scandal stamp'd upon my brow;
For what care I who calls me well or ill,
So you o'er-green my bad, my good allow?

-William Shakespeare, Sonnet 112

 
 Posted:   Dec 30, 2013 - 4:46 PM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)


Your love and pity doth the impression fill
Which vulgar scandal stamp'd upon my brow;
For what care I who calls me well or ill,
So you o'er-green my bad, my good allow?

-William Shakespeare, Sonnet 112



Indeed Josh. 'Bad' as a noun, not an adjective. Bad as in evil, the noun, not the adjective.

There's an old word used in Scotland and Ireland, 'badness', which means mischief. As in the phrase, 'Just for badness'.

'Why did you knock that guy's hat off?'

'Just for badness.'

 
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