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 Posted:   Jan 15, 2014 - 2:16 PM   
 By:   zooba   (Member)

Has anyone ever wondered why in Jerry's TWILIGHT ZONE Overture for the movie, the music from the first segment TIME OUT (the one with Vic Morrow) is not represented in the Overture?

It's a pretty themeless and heavily percussive score in the film which reminds to a certain extent some of what Goldsmith did in his SEVEN DAYS OF MAY Score. Percussive and chimey jabs and stabs and lot's of drums.

So the fact that it really didn't have a distinctive "Theme", is that why the maestro makes no mention of it in the Overture?

Also had heard or read somewhere that the Main Theme used for Joe Dante's A GOOD LIFE segment was originally written by Goldsmith as Norman Bates Theme in PYSCHO II and then dropped for the one that appears in the movie. It's possible I'm wrong about A GOOD LIFE and it was the "Sad Theme" in Spielberg's segment KICK THE CAN that became PSYCHO II.

Your thoughts?

 
 Posted:   Jan 15, 2014 - 2:24 PM   
 By:   Ron Pulliam   (Member)

It may be the notoriety of the segment -- and Vic Morrow's needless death -- that soured Goldsmith on using any of the music in his overture.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 15, 2014 - 2:25 PM   
 By:   rickO   (Member)

I always wondered the same thing! My guess is that it doesn't "fit" in with the romantic style of the other themes and wouldn't jive with the overall feeling of the piece. Or it could be a timing issue, where he had to fit in a certain amount of minutes for the end title? Or maybe he just felt like it...

-Rick O.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 15, 2014 - 2:50 PM   
 By:   nerfTractor   (Member)

I would guess that you're on the right track. The music for the "Time Out" sequence is quite a bit different from the rest of the score, in its orchestration, pace, and overall character. I assume that, if it were included, it would appear at the beginning of the piece (since the overture proceeds from one sequence to the next, in film order). The fanfare from the Spielberg sequence is kind of the perfect opening, and instead of that, Jerry would either have to write a totally new intro, or devise some incredibly clever way to start off this giant orchestral overture with just a few pianos, percussion and synths. I can't think of any way that it would have worked, but then again, Jerry was an incomparable genius, and I'm just some guy.

 
 Posted:   Jan 15, 2014 - 10:26 PM   
 By:   SchiffyM   (Member)

I have to imagine it was simply because the piece flowed better without it. An overture for a musical never features all the songs, just the ones that the composer feels flows into a good representation of the show.

 
 Posted:   Jan 16, 2014 - 6:29 AM   
 By:   Nicolai P. Zwar   (Member)

The "TIME OUT" segment is among my all time favorite Goldsmith cues.

 
 Posted:   Jan 16, 2014 - 6:39 AM   
 By:   Matt B   (Member)

I have to imagine it was simply because the piece flowed better without it. An overture for a musical never features all the songs, just the ones that the composer feels flows into a good representation of the show.

I agree... "Time Out" by design did not seem to have much strong thematic material (not that it wasn't great, just not very theme-y). Couple that with the immortal "rule of threes" and I think it's exclusion is very explainable.

 
 Posted:   Jan 16, 2014 - 11:24 AM   
 By:   BornOfAJackal   (Member)

There was no way to incorporate Time Out, with its slashing and clattering, with the romantic strains in the other three scores.

Time Out would've busted the mood, when a major Hollywood studio would have needed it most, on what ended up being one of the best 70's-80's-sci-fi/adventure/fantasy-cinema-era signature pieces from any soundtrack.

 
 Posted:   Jan 16, 2014 - 12:22 PM   
 By:   Other Tallguy   (Member)

There is a longer version of the Overture on Frontiers. Does that include Time Out? (I don’t have it with me right now.)

 
 Posted:   Jan 16, 2014 - 12:25 PM   
 By:   Other Tallguy   (Member)

DP

 
 Posted:   Jan 16, 2014 - 8:10 PM   
 By:   mxmx   (Member)

Jerry actually approached "Time Out " as an attempt to do the type of score he might have done in the early '60s. It wasn't appropriate to bring it back for the end titles. What's more interesting is that the end credit suite ended up reflecting the final episode order because it wasn't that way when he wrote it!

Mike

 
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