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 Posted:   Apr 8, 2015 - 9:57 AM   
 By:   DeputyRiley   (Member)

While we're on this subject, though, I don't think there's anything wrong with composers getting additional help when writing a big film score in a very short amount of time. It's just the reality of having to do these things on such tight schedules, and I don't think it makes the music "less holy" or anything. I know that John Williams does it. Horner does. Goldsmith did. Newmans Thomas, David, and Randy all have. Desplat and most certainly Giacchino do. Elfman has done it on occasion too, and unlike some of the others, he normally credits his collaborators and specifies what they did, as he did on CHARLOTTE'S WEB, HELLBOY II, HULK, AMERICAN HUSTLE and others. I'm sure he'd write every note himself if time permitted, but it often doesn't.

The composers still set the tone, style and themes for the score and supervise the additional cues... nothing gets played for the director that the composer doesn't weigh in on and like. It's how younger composers get opportunities and learn, and how knowledge is passed on.


Great points, John. Well said. While many people around here feel its an injustice if an additional composer is not credited, certainly more important than that to the composer providing the additional music is, like you said, the opportunity to learn, to participate, to gain experience. I'm sure additional music composers are much more concerned with the thrilling chance to do what they love for a living, to work alongside legendary composers, and to have their music in a television show or feature film. I can't imagine that, given the extraordinary chance to work in Hollywood film/tv music, they are also then clamoring for identification and credit when their work is finished.

Certainly in some cases sure, like Tyler/Badelt in Constantine, Zimmer/Howard in Batman, Powell/Zimmer in Kung Fu Panda, both composers are equally credited. As those have said, additional music credits (in liner notes or the end credits crawl or whatever) are the norm, even if each cue isn't identified as to who wrote them.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 8, 2015 - 10:07 AM   
 By:   ddddeeee   (Member)

'Bliss' does feature Elfman's 'V for Vendetta' theme that is also in 'Did it Hurt', 'Show Me' and 'Counting to Six'.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 8, 2015 - 11:08 AM   
 By:   CindyLover   (Member)

Elfman has done it on occasion too, and unlike some of the others, he normally credits his collaborators and specifies what they did, as he did on CHARLOTTE'S WEB, HELLBOY II, HULK, AMERICAN HUSTLE and others.

Like on Wanted (Deborah Lurie is credited with two cues on the soundtrack album).

 
 Posted:   Apr 8, 2015 - 12:00 PM   
 By:   johnmullin   (Member)

Oh does it contain that theme? I didn't realize. In any case, I stand by my general sentiment.

While many people around here feel its an injustice if an additional composer is not credited, certainly more important than that to the composer providing the additional music is, like you said, the opportunity to learn, to participate, to gain experience.

Well the real injustice is not giving the additional composer credit on the cue sheets. That's the big thing… it means that they get additional royalty money for their work down the line. I remember reading some interview with Elfman where there was discussion of fact that the DARK KNIGHT score was ruled ineligible for the Oscars because 5 people were credited on the submission sheet -- more than what was allowable by the Music Branch rules. Elfman countered that by that saying that giving the additional composers cue sheet credit is the right thing to do. And it is.

I know one person who contributed a cue or two to a major action movie several years ago, and in addition to getting the opportunity to write a cue for a big orchestra and to receive the main composer's guidance and feedback, he also received cue sheet credit for his work and the residual income from that really helped keep him afloat for a few years afterward. Mentorship aside, that's the sort of thing that helps young composers hang in there and make a career of it.

 
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