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 Posted:   Jan 26, 2014 - 9:34 PM   
 By:   DavidCorkum   (Member)


Mancini died in 1994. TITANIC came out in 1997, meaning that it wouldn't have been at the Academy Awards until spring 1998.


Perhaps the offer wasn't the result of Mancini's passing, but just happened later during Titanic's year of release? Or maybe it never happened. Gossip, gossip.

 
 Posted:   Jan 26, 2014 - 10:06 PM   
 By:   orion_mk3   (Member)

That Mancina montage is wonderful. Who wouldn't like to stay up drinking with Elliot Goldenthal?

In one of the interviews leading up to "Voyage of the Dawn Treader," David Arnold described himself and HGW as friends, and that they'd chatted informally about the score--seems plausible to me considering their similar backgrounds. And I know that Danny Elfman and Thomas Newman know each other and were, at least at one time, close enough for Elfman to recommend Newman for "Scent of a Woman" thanks to the Elfman Box book.

 
 Posted:   Jan 26, 2014 - 11:20 PM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

I recall, I could have names mixed up here, reading an interview with either Shire or Broughton where one said he was in town and needed a palce to stay, and the other offered to let him stay at his house, 'cause apparently they are good friends.

In fact, while trying to find that interview, I stumbled upon this humorous quote from an interview with Shire (www.RunMovies.eu) where he tells a quick story that occured after his score to "Homeward Bound" was rejected:

My son Matthew who was 17 at the time is a great fan of mine, very defensive of his father. He went to a dance after this happened and found himself dancing with Bruce Broughton’s daughter. Matt said, “I hear your father scored INCREDIBLE JOURNEY.” “Yes, he did,” she said, “Well, mine did too!” he shot back.

If only he had his son on hand anytime somebody tried to rejected a score in person. ;-)

Both composers, by the way, Joel MNeely says were very supportive and helped him get into scoring.



Johnny Mandel and Howard Blake were apparently good aquintances.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 27, 2014 - 12:04 AM   
 By:   governor   (Member)

Henry Mancini and Michel Legrand were close friends.

Michel Legrand and John williams are also good friends.

In his recent autobiography (published only in french) Mr Legrand describes a :

"Lovely evening with John Williams(....) He tells me, smiling,"you know I feel myself as a craftman". (...) his life is monastical, revolves exclusively around music and nothing else. Where did I get this strange feeling that John composes to fight against boredom ?
We talk about writing and share the same conclusion : at our ages, more than ever, elements of doubt win over certitudes."

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 27, 2014 - 2:11 AM   
 By:   governor   (Member)

Georges Delerue was close friends with Gerard Calvi, they share the same flat when they were young students in Paris.

John Williams was also friends with Alex North and Bernard Herrmann (already mentioned)

Hans Zimmer and James Newton Howard are still good friends after their two batman films.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 27, 2014 - 10:20 AM   
 By:   Jon Broxton   (Member)

I went to a dinner party at Carole Goldsmith's house (after Jerry had died), where Charles Fox was launching his autobiography. There are two baby grand pianos in the Goldsmith's living room, and at one point in the evening I was chatting to Carole, and she was telling me that Goldsmith used to invite "the Newman boys" (meaning David and Thomas), Johnny (meaning Williams) and James Newton Howard round when they were younger, and they would all sit around the pianos and riff on various film scores they had written.

What evenings they must have been!

 
 Posted:   Jan 27, 2014 - 12:01 PM   
 By:   Other Tallguy   (Member)

I’m getting the impression that the only composers who DIDN’T get along were Horner and Goldsmith!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 27, 2014 - 6:29 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

Broughtfan: You mean "Carrie Goldsmith." Carol was Mr. Goldsmith's second wife.

In any event, in addition to the aforementioned admiration for Mark Snow and his music for "The X-Files," Leonard Rosenman was good friends with several of his peers, including Jerry Goldsmith, David Raksin, Alex North (in spite of his mixed feelings on his music), and (based on the fact that he hosted his 80th birthday party) Hugo Friedhofer. Later on in life, he and his wife became friendly with Paul Haslinger. He was also very close with several seminal figures in the American concert world including Aaron Copland and Leonard Bernstein.


Yes, of course you're correct: Carrie Goldsmith (corrected in original posting).


Rosenman's wife went in place of him at Goldsmith's funeral (he was ill).

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 28, 2014 - 12:46 PM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

Broughtfan: You mean "Carrie Goldsmith." Carol was Mr. Goldsmith's second wife.

In any event, in addition to the aforementioned admiration for Mark Snow and his music for "The X-Files," Leonard Rosenman was good friends with several of his peers, including Jerry Goldsmith, David Raksin, Alex North (in spite of his mixed feelings on his music), and (based on the fact that he hosted his 80th birthday party) Hugo Friedhofer. Later on in life, he and his wife became friendly with Paul Haslinger. He was also very close with several seminal figures in the American concert world including Aaron Copland and Leonard Bernstein.


Yes, of course you're correct: Carrie Goldsmith (corrected in original posting).


Rosenman's wife went in place of him at Goldsmith's funeral (he was ill). Also, despite that Rosenman was good friends with Raksin, he referred to "Laura" as a rather absurd premise and that the song "sold itself to a brainwashed public" (according to Tony Thomas' book "Film Score: A View From The Podium")

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 28, 2014 - 4:53 PM   
 By:   mrchriswell   (Member)

I wish I knew where I had seen it but a couple of years ago I came across an extensive interview with Herrmann's widow who dished on her husband's relationships with his peers. Apparently he actively disliked Andre Previn and was resentful that at one point Quincy Jones commanded higher fees than he was getting.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 28, 2014 - 6:53 PM   
 By:   TheFamousEccles   (Member)

Two more with Rosenman that just struck me, but they're just off-the-beaten track enough to note here: LR was also very, very close with Irwin Bazelon (Mrs. Bazelon still says of him: "He was one of my best friends."), as well as Vernon Duke ("April in Paris," "I Can't Get Started," "Autumn in New York," etc., etc., etc.). They both respected and admired each other's music quite a bit. Mrs. Duke spoke fondly of Leonard when we worked together on a concert of her husband's music.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 28, 2014 - 9:14 PM   
 By:   jwb   (Member)

I wish I knew where I had seen it but a couple of years ago I came across an extensive interview with Herrmann's widow who dished on her husband's relationships with his peers. Apparently he actively disliked Andre Previn and was resentful that at one point Quincy Jones commanded higher fees than he was getting.

I'd believe it. Herrmann had a bloated ego.

 
 Posted:   Jan 29, 2014 - 2:47 AM   
 By:   Amer Zahid   (Member)

John Williams was also mentored by Bernard Herrmann. And the two had a very good rapport. I remember the case when Williams was approached to score Hitchcock's last film FAMILY PLOT and Williams stopped to ask Herrmann if it was ok for him to take the project. Ofcourse Herrmann was very encouraging.

Williams was also advised by Herrmann to make copies of his entire score for his personal library so that these dont get destroyed or lost under the auspices of the studio.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 29, 2014 - 10:49 AM   
 By:   filmusicnow   (Member)

I wish I knew where I had seen it but a couple of years ago I came across an extensive interview with Herrmann's widow who dished on her husband's relationships with his peers. Apparently he actively disliked Andre Previn and was resentful that at one point Quincy Jones commanded higher fees than he was getting.

I'd believe it. Herrmann had a bloated ego.



Herrmann called Previn a "jazz boy" and probably didn't care for Jones' music.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 1, 2014 - 8:24 PM   
 By:   nerfTractor   (Member)

Henry Mancini and Michel Legrand were close friends.

Michel Legrand and John williams are also good friends.

In his recent autobiography (published only in french) Mr Legrand describes a :

"Lovely evening with John Williams(....) He tells me, smiling,"you know I feel myself as a craftman". (...) his life is monastical, revolves exclusively around music and nothing else. Where did I get this strange feeling that John composes to fight against boredom ?
We talk about writing and share the same conclusion : at our ages, more than ever, elements of doubt win over certitudes."


Since I read this quote of yours the other day, I have thought long and hard about it. I consider Jerry the one who wrote from the gut and Johnny the one who created a perfect tapestry. This quote from John describes just why he is my favorite. He is indeed the immaculate craftsman.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 1, 2014 - 8:24 PM   
 By:   nerfTractor   (Member)

Sorry for the double post.

As stated earlier, I do think it's clear that Jerry and Alex had a mutual love.

Did Herrmann ever speak well of a fellow craftsman? Jerry maybe.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 2, 2014 - 1:05 AM   
 By:   nerfTractor   (Member)

Well Jerry was a curmudgeon, wasn't he? It seems as if JW is a perfect jewel. Elmer was a sweet muppet and as we all know Benny was a CUN... Tuesday. From all I hear Patrick Doyle is a right gentleman.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 2, 2014 - 1:05 AM   
 By:   nerfTractor   (Member)

Double

 
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