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 Posted:   Feb 6, 2014 - 12:39 AM   
 By:   WillGoldNewtonBarryGrusin   (Member)

For years I hated the contemporary technique of layering a score with drum loops, sound effects and atmosphere, instead of composing lush melodies for a big orchestra.

I grew up with and got interested by scores of John Williams, Jerry Goldsmith, John Barry and - well, you can guess it by my screen name.

Early Zimmer I did like ("Pacific Heights" is still one of my all-time favorites, as is "Regarding Henry"). But in the late 90´s I began to resist and actually to despise the emerging MV sound, dominating film scores for the next decade and longer.

However, in the last weeks I have grown to appreciate "that kind of score". I don´t know why it happened - but I have come to the conclusion that I was just stubborn and frustrated that my favorite type of score was growing out of fashion.

Sometimes, I feel, one has to reexamine one´s automatic responses and open up for other offerings. Only then one can really listen without prejudice.

And then one might be surprised to find out that one can like many things, not only that which one liked for ages.

Has this happened to anyone else? Appreciating scores which you could not stand before?

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 6, 2014 - 12:46 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Sure, it happens all the time. I constantly try to evaluate and reevaluate my own preferences. Of course, sometimes you will still dislike what you disliked back then -- if it's almost 'biologically' adverse to your taste -- but often there's an evolution going on. We've had quite a few threads about that over the years.

 
 Posted:   Feb 6, 2014 - 12:50 AM   
 By:   Loren   (Member)

Has this happened to anyone else? Appreciating scores which you could not stand before?

Generally to me it happens the contrary: cannot listen anymore to scores which I appreciated before (for example almost all Williams production since the nineties)

 
 Posted:   Feb 6, 2014 - 1:00 AM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)

For years I hated the contemporary technique of layering a score with drum loops... However, in the last weeks I have grown to appreciate "that kind of score"... Has this happened to anyone else?



No, it's not happened to me.
My dislike of such rubbish has actually grown more intense then ever.
Perhaps you have just got used to that kind of score, like someone who lives alongside an airport eventually gets used to the horrible noise and doesn't get bothered by it any more.

 
 Posted:   Feb 6, 2014 - 1:32 AM   
 By:   WillGoldNewtonBarryGrusin   (Member)

For years I hated the contemporary technique of layering a score with drum loops... However, in the last weeks I have grown to appreciate "that kind of score"... Has this happened to anyone else?



No, it's not happened to me.
My dislike of such rubbish has actually grown more intense then ever.
Perhaps you have just got used to that kind of score, like someone who lives alongside an airport eventually gets used to the horrible noise and doesn't get bothered by it any more.


Very amusing way to describe it.

But, really, I don´t think I got accustomed to it. Instead, I am ready to listen to it like I have never allowed myself before.

 
 Posted:   Feb 6, 2014 - 1:41 AM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

A golden ager coming out of the zimmer?! wink

What scores did you take a liking to and maybe people can recommend you more?

P.S. as to changing your opinion, I had a strong dislike of anything Jablonsky but for some reason took a liking to 'Ender's Game'. I do try to keep an open mind about a lot of music but also a rational mind that I wont be able to listen to it all, let alone like it all. And with any musical technique, it's how its used not that it's used.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 6, 2014 - 2:13 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

... and music, generally.

I agree with the OP completely ... I've recognised a significant widening of my tastes over the years (with some contractions, too, I'll admit ... though, perhaps I never really was that taken with such music).

For example, whilst I used to detest The Beatles and their fellow pop groups I've now adjusted to simply ignoring them smile ... but, more pertinently ... I was never taken with Mozart whereas these days, albeit far from being a favourite, I enjoy almost all of my library (not quite there with the Requiem Mass, yet!) And I'm about to start on Opera.

In our genre, I used to eschew the works of the Golden Age, in the main, but now find I'm playing more and more of Korngold, Steiner, early-Herrmann, Ibert, Shostakovich (especially) ... still not quite there with Waxman. Perhaps, if I live to be 100 and my hearing still works, I shall get a taste for the modern score composers.

But whilst I attribute my widening tastes to ageing, I also firmly believe that improved hi-fi aids no-end. This is so noticeable in complex works.

Mitch

 
 Posted:   Feb 6, 2014 - 3:06 AM   
 By:   WillGoldNewtonBarryGrusin   (Member)

A golden ager coming out of the zimmer?! wink

What scores did you take a liking to and maybe people can recommend you more?

P.S. as to changing your opinion, I had a strong dislike of anything Jablonsky but for some reason took a liking to 'Ender's Game'. I do try to keep an open mind about a lot of music but also a rational mind that I wont be able to listen to it all, let alone like it all. And with any musical technique, it's how its used not that it's used.


Yes, I was also very hesitant to listen to Jablonsky (probably because I do not like Michael Bay´s movies and don´t think that I ever will). But "Ender´s Game" won me over, too. I like that one.

Also... now setting me up for complete hate and ridicule - I am beginning to enjoy JNH´s "Green Lantern"...

Maybe what began to turn it around for me was Zimmer´s "Man of Steel" (anybody still there reading?) which I liked more and more and now really love. Then his "Lone Ranger"-score.

And at the beginning of this year: Patrick Doyle´s "Jack Ryan".

I also began to really love (and finally appreciate) Doyle´s "Thor" and "Rise of the Planet of the Apes".

Of course, Bromfman´s "Robocop", too, after I had viciously made fun of it.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 6, 2014 - 5:13 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

I expressed my dislike of Marco Beltrami and in particular "The Watcher" on these pages some years ago, and former FSMer Oblicno offered to take it off my hands. An off board dialogue and friendship ensued, and while he's still got my copy of The Watcher, he introduced me to other Beltramic wonders, and I'm now quite the fan.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 6, 2014 - 9:45 AM   
 By:   Kim Tong   (Member)

For years I hated the contemporary technique of layering a score with drum loops... However, in the last weeks I have grown to appreciate "that kind of score"... Has this happened to anyone else?



No, it's not happened to me.
My dislike of such rubbish has actually grown more intense then ever.
Perhaps you have just got used to that kind of score, like someone who lives alongside an airport eventually gets used to the horrible noise and doesn't get bothered by it any more.


I have even given Zimmer and his crew more chances to write enjoyable music, but to my ears is all sounds the same. I have a few of his older scores that I still enjoy, but nothing in the past 10+ years.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 6, 2014 - 10:03 AM   
 By:   MikeP   (Member)

A golden ager coming out of the zimmer?! wink

What scores did you take a liking to and maybe people can recommend you more?

P.S. as to changing your opinion, I had a strong dislike of anything Jablonsky but for some reason took a liking to 'Ender's Game'. I do try to keep an open mind about a lot of music but also a rational mind that I wont be able to listen to it all, let alone like it all. And with any musical technique, it's how its used not that it's used.


Yes, I was also very hesitant to listen to Jablonsky (probably because I do not like Michael Bay´s movies and don´t think that I ever will). But "Ender´s Game" won me over, too. I like that one.

Also... now setting me up for complete hate and ridicule - I am beginning to enjoy JNH´s "Green Lantern"...

Maybe what began to turn it around for me was Zimmer´s "Man of Steel" (anybody still there reading?) which I liked more and more and now really love. Then his "Lone Ranger"-score.

And at the beginning of this year: Patrick Doyle´s "Jack Ryan".

I also began to really love (and finally appreciate) Doyle´s "Thor" and "Rise of the Planet of the Apes".

Of course, Bromfman´s "Robocop", too, after I had viciously made fun of it.



Good for you. I'm as likely to listen to Waxman on any given day as I am likely to put on Zimmer's DaVinci Code. It is referred to as having an open mind big grin

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 6, 2014 - 10:19 AM   
 By:   scrapsly   (Member)

A particular score ? Of course my opinion has changed on some just like it does with maybe a particular artist. I was never a big Joel McNeely fan years ago, but I have become one. Facts or feelings ? Facts normally don't change as much as feelings. With age and experience normally (not always) comes wisdom. Opinions are like a@@holes, everyone has one.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 6, 2014 - 10:28 AM   
 By:   Joe E.   (Member)

More than my opinions on individual scores, I find my opinions on individual composers changing, as their subsequent efforts appear.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 6, 2014 - 10:28 AM   
 By:   GoblinScore   (Member)

I'm a complete "victim" of this, its why I never part with anything.

In the Remote Control case, I think we're all just being literally beaten
into submission there. We still love film music, and since that sound is
the only game in town, beat 'em or join 'em.

I've had it happen far too often, even with my beloved Goldsmith, I hate
a score on cd, keep trying with it, and find I love it in time.

Never give up, gang!!

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 6, 2014 - 10:36 AM   
 By:   Broughtfan   (Member)

Not that I hated the score, per se, but I never really understood what the big deal was about John Barry's score for "Born Free," that is until I saw the movie three or four years ago on DVD. Before then I'd really only seen the film on network television (with all the edits to accommodate commercial breaks and such). Now I not only really like Barry's score but, as someone who himself composes, admire the craft that went into creating it (and it's a lengthier score than what I previously remember). It is, in a word, magical.

Other than this, I had a love-hate relationship with Vangelis' Chariots of Fire until I watched the video of the song on Casey Kasem's America's Top Ten show, Vangelis, in true one-man band fashion, performing everything in the video (of the main title) from keyboards to timpani (the guy does a really good, measured timp roll!) You can't help but admire such musicianship.

 
 Posted:   Feb 6, 2014 - 11:20 AM   
 By:   jackfu   (Member)

Occasionally. I seriously flip-flopped on Previn’s Rollerball score; initiated, I guess by hearing it before having seen the film. I’ve always been and still am ambivalent about scores which rely heavily on classical music. I’m often unsure as to the motivation of the composer in those cases. For the Rollerball score I was okay with Toccata and Fugue to open, and enthralled with Allegro Non Troppo at the end with my mind envisioning “Jonathan” skating around the rink in victory as the music rises to a glorious finale.
Upon seeing the film I was really frustrated with the way the score was utilized and didn’t listen to it for years as a result. I’ve since mellowed on it and have come once again to embrace it. I still think it was very poorly utilized for the film, though.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 6, 2014 - 2:52 PM   
 By:   Gary Mongiovi   (Member)

I can't think of a complete about-face that I've done, but I do notice that my tastes have evolved as I've learned more about film scoring. Now I definitely appreciate subtleties that went right past me when I was a youngster. Back in my early days as a film music fan I could get easily seduced by a piece of head-candy like David Arnold's The Musketeer or Hans Zimmer's Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron. I can still enjoy those scores, but I don't find them as impressive as when I first heard them.

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 6, 2014 - 3:13 PM   
 By:   Michael24   (Member)

My tastes haven't really changed all that much over the years. The things I enjoyed in my younger years are typically still the same things I continue to enjoy nowadays. I'm a pretty simple person.

As for film music specifically, I don't think I've really had a radical change in opinion on a specific score. I've always been open to a variety of genres and styles, but within those there are always going to be scores that simply just don't do anything for me. Even if there's another score in the same genre or style that I love. But if there's something I don't care for, I'm not going to keep playing it over and over just in the hopes that I might "come around" and start liking it. I shouldn't have to force myself to like anything. I listen to something and I either like it or don't. It's as easy as that.

 
 Posted:   Feb 6, 2014 - 3:36 PM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

I agree that it's usually with composers that I flip. I was so disappointed by Alexandre Desplat's score for "The Twilight Saga: New Moon" that I allowed my frustration that it WASN'T a continuation of Carter Burwell's score for the first film to blind me to what a fine composer he was -- and I freely admitted that probably NO composer could have made "New Moon" better than it was! I would later watch movies not knowing who had composed their fine scores, such as "Coco Before Chanel," "The King's Speech," and "Renoir," and be amazed to discover that they were composed by Desplat. So I've taken my beating for my initial prejudice against him!

 
 
 Posted:   Feb 6, 2014 - 4:49 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

Like most things I see it as a 50/50 thing[but don't yell fire in a crowded movie house, as the saying goes] we change over the years some music I enjoyed more decades ago, some music I appreciated more then years ago, Some that I really like I will probably like till my last day on earth and some I didn't and most likely never will get into.Not because it is good or bad, but simply because it is me.I have matured over the years to realize with creative ventures so much of it, is really just an opinion and how a mind relates to different notes and chords, why argue, sure, I am not saying there are certain composers who have an ability to do things other composers can't and sure there are very prolific composers while there are composers who run out of creative gas after a few years.But in the long run the enjoyment of music is a very personal subjective thing, Who can say why one piece to one person is the greatest in the world, and another person can't react to it at all. I know one thing I truly believe diversity is the spice of life. I feel the greatest lost is for one human being in music is to never to give some music a chance that they would have loved if they would have only given that music a chance, I am sure every human in this world will leave this world never realizing how many things they would have loved if only they gave that thing whatever it is on earth a chance. There is no sadder thing spoken then the words what might have been.

 
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