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 Posted:   Mar 12, 2014 - 3:00 AM   
 By:   Ray Faiola   (Member)

Wow - I almost missed THIS one. ORDERED!

 
 Posted:   Mar 12, 2014 - 5:33 AM   
 By:   Frank DeWald   (Member)



"Who" is Time Records, Inc.?

I can't find any information about them on the world wide web.



Time Records was the "parent" company of Mainstream Records. Both were founded by Bob Shad (Time in 1959 and Mainstream in 1964). Time specialized mostly in easy-listening, early stereo "spectaculars," but the label had at least one other tenuous connection to film music. It was their release of Toshiro Mayuzumi's Nirvana-Symphony (issued in 1962 with cover art -- I just noticed for the first time -- by Yoko Ono!) that inspired John Huston to hire the composer to score THE BIBLE.

Find a bit more here: http://www.discogs.com/label/20318-Time-Records-3?page=1

 
 Posted:   Mar 12, 2014 - 6:07 AM   
 By:   Chris1770   (Member)

That was most helpful, thanks alot Frank!

It gives me a clearer picture now.

I read on Wikipedia that Judd Apatow is the grandson of Robert Shad. Judd's mother is Tami Apatow (née Shad), Judd's father is Maury Apatow.

So the Apatow family owns the record label "Time Records, Inc." - or, at least, parts of it.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 17, 2014 - 12:44 PM   
 By:   Morricone   (Member)

I am late coming to this but heartily concur that this sounds amazing!

WALK ON THE WILD SIDE is worth the price of admission, but THE CARETAKERS and CARPETBAGGERS are surprisingly crisp.

And last but not least TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD gets justice, all in one box!

Mucho grass, Intrada!

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 17, 2014 - 2:01 PM   
 By:   eriknelson   (Member)

I'm enjoying this set too. I love everything except BABY THE RAIN MUST FALL. Not too thrilled with the rock numbers. But the set is a bargain for the quality.

 
 Posted:   Mar 17, 2014 - 3:31 PM   
 By:   Advise & Consent   (Member)


WALK ON THE WILD SIDE is worth the price of admission


This! The set would be cheap at twice the price.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 24, 2014 - 11:44 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

I've just given Walk on the Wild Side its first play, the set having arrived earlier today.

The sound is magnificent (smile) and I'm so pleased I decided to buy this even though I already have recordings of the other albums, save the Movie and TV Themes collection.

I owned a copy of the Mainstream vinyl LP (a re-release) for many years ... it's wonderful to hear the score again ... and in superb sound.

I shall compare the sound quality for Baby, Caretakers and Carpetbaggers later this week and junk the older copies.

As for Mockingbird, the notes indicate that this is a smaller orchestra, almost chamber-style, and I'm looking forward to hearing this since the two later recordings - brilliant as they are - have never quite hit the mark with me (Bernstein is my second favourite composer).

Mitch

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 24, 2014 - 1:47 PM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

Time specialized mostly in easy-listening, early stereo "spectaculars," but the label had at least one other tenuous connection to film music. It was their release of Toshiro Mayuzumi's Nirvana-Symphony (issued in 1962 with cover art -- I just noticed for the first time -- by Yoko Ono!) that inspired John Huston to hire the composer to score THE BIBLE.



Time Records also issued the LP with Pete Rugolo's music from the television show "Thriller."

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 27, 2014 - 1:57 AM   
 By:   Preston Neal Jones   (Member)

First, about those two dots. It's not a Swedish thing, per se, it's a pronunciation thing. Fred Astaire's daughter's name was and is pronounced: AH - vuh. As opposed to AY - vuh Gardner...

If Astaire's occasional lyricist, Johnny Mercer, can start Capitol Records, why shouldn't Fred create Ava -- especially since it dealt in jazz and pop as well as film scores? I don't know when Fred first met Elmer, but Bernstein had scored at least one of Fred's two dramas on TV's GENERAL ELECTRIC THEATER, and the Columbia LP of G.E. Themes -- now, there's an Elmer album that still cries out for a CD release! -- includes the theme from one of them, "Man on a Bicycle." (Incidentally, the booklet from the CD of Elmer conducting Conrad Salinger arrangements for MGM contains a great snapshot of Fred and Elmer.)

Dana Wilcox, as always, says everything I might want to say about Ava's MOCKINGBIRD. *HI, DANA!* And I'm obviously not the only Bernstein admirer for whom this entire box set is indeed a longtime dream come true. It even succeeds in finally, all these years since the original CARPETBAGGERS LP, confirming my suspicion that we're listening to jazz great Harry "Sweets" Edison blowing that eloquent trumpet in the "Carpetbagger Blues."

So Thank you, Intrada, for putting together this treasure with such love.

But, forgive me, please, for mentioning the one aspect of the collection with which I am definitely not pleased. Why, oh why, oh why, given the apparent necessity of coupling MOCKINGBIRD with the brassy, jazzy THEMES, didn't you simply program THEMES first and MOCKINGBIRD second? The tender, sensitive, dreamy MOCKINGBIRD transports the listener to another realm, but then a few seconds later, the THEMES land down like a proverbial ton of bricks, shattering everything Bernstein's masterpiece had just accomplished.

(WHAT) WERE YOU THINKING?!

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 27, 2014 - 3:06 AM   
 By:   Preston Neal Jones   (Member)

PS: If MOCKINGBIRD leads you to SUMMER AND SMOKE, per Dana's excellent advice, may I subsequently recommend the pastoral Bernstein in GOD'S LITTLE ACRE, A WALK IN THE SPRING RAIN, DRANGO and, especially, DESIRE UNDER THE ELMS. All are on CD, and there are plenty of other worthy scores where they came from.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 27, 2014 - 3:12 AM   
 By:   TheFamousEccles   (Member)

But, forgive me, please, for mentioning the one aspect of the collection with which I am definitely not pleased. Why, oh why, oh why, given the apparent necessity of coupling MOCKINGBIRD with the brassy, jazzy THEMES, didn't you simply program THEMES first and MOCKINGBIRD second? The tender, sensitive, dreamy MOCKINGBIRD transports the listener to another realm, but then a few seconds later, the THEMES land down like a proverbial ton of bricks, shattering everything Bernstein's masterpiece had just accomplished.

(WHAT) WERE YOU THINKING?!


I don't know, I rather like the choice - to me, the "Themes" album feels like the summative moment of the set, a sort of "condensed history of Bernstein," for lack of a better phrase, encapsulating everything in Bernstein's career up until that time. It's almost as though all of the previous albums, taken together as a holistic piece, were all building up to this moment of retrospection and celebration. It also, as pointed out by Intrada in a few places, offers a nice bit of musical symmetry. The "Themes" album ends with an arrangement of "Walk on the Wild Side," thus offering the sense of coming "full circle" with the set.

Still, I more than understand your view here.

 
 Posted:   Mar 27, 2014 - 8:11 AM   
 By:   Nicolai P. Zwar   (Member)

What is the definite version of To Kill A Mockingbird? It looks like this new Intrada release is more incomplete compared to other releases.

If by definitive you mean "among all available re-recordings, the one most like the original soundtrack performance of the score as heard in the film," then the Ava recording (featured in this new Intrada release) wins hands-down. Probably the best combo of "most like film score" and "most complete" would pair the Ava and FMC recordings. The Varese re-recording is a more passionate, larger orchestra rendition of the music which abandons the smaller, more delicate and childlike performance that was heard in the film and reflected in the Ava and (to a lesser extent) the FMC release.


This is true and spot on. Both recordings are very much worthwhile, it's definitely not an "either or issue".

The Varese recording is a completely different ballgame. I got to know the score trough the old Ava recording, then heard it all over again on the Varese re-recording. It is great to have the Ava recording available again with much improved sound, but I'd never part with my Varese recording either. Both are beautiful and a wonderful demonstration of how to different approaches to the same musical material can be valid.

 
 Posted:   Mar 27, 2014 - 9:50 AM   
 By:   Dana Wilcox   (Member)

First, about those two dots. It's not a Swedish thing, per se, it's a pronunciation thing. Fred Astaire's daughter's name was and is pronounced: AH - vuh. As opposed to AY - vuh Gardner...

If Astaire's occasional lyricist, Johnny Mercer, can start Capitol Records, why shouldn't Fred create Ava -- especially since it dealt in jazz and pop as well as film scores? I don't know when Fred first met Elmer, but Bernstein had scored at least one of Fred's two dramas on TV's GENERAL ELECTRIC THEATER, and the Columbia LP of G.E. Themes -- now, there's an Elmer album that still cries out for a CD release! -- includes the theme from one of them, "Man on a Bicycle." (Incidentally, the booklet from the CD of Elmer conducting Conrad Salinger arrangements for MGM contains a great snapshot of Fred and Elmer.)

Dana Wilcox, as always, says everything I might want to say about Ava's MOCKINGBIRD. *HI, DANA!* And I'm obviously not the only Bernstein admirer for whom this entire box set is indeed a longtime dream come true. It even succeeds in finally, all these years since the original CARPETBAGGERS LP, confirming my suspicion that we're listening to jazz great Harry "Sweets" Edison blowing that eloquent trumpet in the "Carpetbagger Blues."

So Thank you, Intrada, for putting together this treasure with such love.

But, forgive me, please, for mentioning the one aspect of the collection with which I am definitely not pleased. Why, oh why, oh why, given the apparent necessity of coupling MOCKINGBIRD with the brassy, jazzy THEMES, didn't you simply program THEMES first and MOCKINGBIRD second? The tender, sensitive, dreamy MOCKINGBIRD transports the listener to another realm, but then a few seconds later, the THEMES land down like a proverbial ton of bricks, shattering everything Bernstein's masterpiece had just accomplished.

(WHAT) WERE YOU THINKING?!


Back atcha, Preston! Happily second the motion on a release of the GENERAL ELECTRIC THEATER album. My personal favorite on that one is Elmer's "Lavender Waltz," a lovely but off-kilter piece that reminds me of the theme he wrote for Alma's senile mother in SUMMER AND SMOKE.

Would appreciate it if you could drop me an email -- check my profile for the address. Thanks!

 
 Posted:   Apr 9, 2014 - 6:00 AM   
 By:   Valiant65   (Member)

I had a helluva time getting disc 2 off of that hub. Really thought I was going to snap the disc in half to remove it.

I finally nudged it off after a lot of praying, and now have no plans to put the disc back on that stiff hub. I'll place disc 2 in a sleeve.

Anyone have a trick to getting this disc on and off?

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 9, 2014 - 6:46 AM   
 By:   eriknelson   (Member)

I had a helluva time getting disc 2 off of that hub. Really thought I was going to snap the disc in half to remove it.

I finally nudged it off after a lot of praying, and now have no plans to put the disc back on that stiff hub. I'll place disc 2 in a sleeve.

Anyone have a trick to getting this disc on and off?


Yes, I had that problem. Like you I was scared of breaking the disc! I was thinking it might be my particular case that was faulty. Apparently not. Putting this disc in the sleeve may be the best solution. Or, perhaps with use the hub will loosen up.

 
 Posted:   Apr 9, 2014 - 6:54 AM   
 By:   orbital   (Member)

I had a helluva time getting disc 2 off of that hub. Really thought I was going to snap the disc in half to remove it.

I finally nudged it off after a lot of praying, and now have no plans to put the disc back on that stiff hub. I'll place disc 2 in a sleeve.

Anyone have a trick to getting this disc on and off?


Same here. I remember several threads where people mentioned this kind of problem and each time I thought, well, what *is* the problem. Always managed the get the discs out. 'Til the Ava Collection. Disc 2 and I had a fight. In the end we both lost in a way: I got the disc out but had to sacrifice one of those tiny plastic "hub teeth thingys". Fortunately the disc still holds itself on this hub without falling out. And it's now easy to release it.

 
 Posted:   Apr 9, 2014 - 9:04 AM   
 By:   Basil Wrathbone   (Member)



Anyone have a trick to getting this disc on and off?






Try pressing the center of the tray with your thumb from BEHIND the tray, as you ease the CD off.

 
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