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 Posted:   Mar 28, 2014 - 5:54 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

RAWHIDE
The black and white cowboys and cattle series Rawhide lasted eight seasons from 1959 to 1965 and on CBS.
Many people remembered the series from the initial season 1 and never tried to dig beyond that point
hence a lack of understanding.
It starred Eric Fleming as trail boss Gil Favor and Clint Eastwood as ramrod Rowdy Yates.

It had six "big" periods.
Season 1 to 3 under producer Charles Marquis Warren (1)
Season 4 under producer Endre Bohem
Season 5 to 6 under producer Vincent M. Fennelly
Season 7 (two thirds) under producers Bruce Geller (2) and Bernard Kowalski
Season 7 under producer Endre Bohem
Season 8 under producer Robert E. Thompson (3)

The diehard people considered the first formula to be the best and the most traditional and the final season to be the worst because of the poor scripts and the absence of actor Eric Fleming who died violently. Under Warren, the character of Gil Favor starts each first starts with a soliloquy and introduces himself.

Casual viewers were more attracted by the middle producers from season 4 to 6 in which they started to include many "meaty, character-driven pieces".

The television historians and film fans asserted that only season 7 was worthwhile because it took a daring revisionist approach of the series, not far away from the realm of Sam Peckinpah. From that season, all episode titles loose the gimmick title "Incident of…".

Music-wise, the series featured many old style composers: [updated]
• Russell Garcia (22 episodes, 1959)
• Leon Klatzkin (7 episodes, 1963-1964)
• Fred Steiner (6 episodes, 1961-1964)
• Rudy Schrager (6 episodes, 1964-1965)
• Nathan Scott (4 episodes, 1963-1964)
• Bernard Herrmann (2 episodes, 1965)
• Lyn Murray (2 episodes, 1965)
• Leith Stevens (1 episode, 1960)
• Jerry Goldsmith (1 episode, 1961)
• Paul Sawtell (1 episode, 1963)
• Richard Shores (1 episode, 1964)
• Johnny Green (1 episode, 1965)
• Gerald Fried (1 episode, 1965)
• Hugo Friedhofer (1 episode, 1965)
• Billy May (1 episode, 1965)




Footnotes
(1) creator-producer of Gunsmoke
(2) creator-producer of Mission: Impossible
(3) producer of Mission: Impossible during season 3

 
 Posted:   Mar 28, 2014 - 8:28 AM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)


Music-wise, the series featured many old style composers:
• Russell Garcia (22 episodes, 1959)
• Leon Klatzkin (7 episodes, 1963-1964)
• Fred Steiner (6 episodes, 1961-1964)
• Rudy Schrager (6 episodes, 1964-1965)
• Nathan Scott (4 episodes, 1963-1964)
• Bernard Herrmann (2 episodes, 1965)
• Lyn Murray (2 episodes, 1965)
• Leith Stevens (1 episode, 1960)
• Jerry Goldsmith (1 episode, 1961)
• Paul Sawtell (1 episode, 1963)
• Richard Shores (1 episode, 1964)
• Johnny Green (1 episode, 1965)

Here's a handy listing I put together:
http://tvscoring.150m.com/Rawhide.html

Missing from your above list is also Gerald Fried, Hugo Friedhofer, and Billy May.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 29, 2014 - 12:34 PM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

I will post now a report on each episode of season 7 (1964-1965) from a Mission: Impossible perspective first and cinematic perspective too.

"Head them up! Move them Out!"

All episodes produced by Bruce Geller and Bernard Kowalski
feature a brand new main titles:

1. a new typeface (Latin Wide) is chosen to introduce the series title
before a cow comes charging straight at the audience followed by
a freeze frame to the shadow of its feature and dissolves to a bronze.
2. the three leading actors are presented with a distinctive slow-motion action scene
that freezes frame/dissolve to a bronze statue and a bronze portrait of the actor.
Impressive.

Eric Fleming as trail boss Gil Favor
Clint Eastwood as ramrod Rowdy Yates
Paul Brinegar as cook Wishbone


Latin Wide
The 'Latin' family of typefaces is characterized by its large, sharp, triangular serifs.
http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/urw/latin/


associate producer Del Reisman


I received my sets after ten years of waiting.

VOLUME #1
I watched the first two episodes and I was glad to discover a character-driven series,
well-written, well-directed and with some nice guest actors: Warren Oates and Lee Van Cleef.
The first episode is focused on Rowdy Yates (actor Clint Eastwood) double-crossing his boss
after quitting and decides to work on his own and hires a ramrod named Weed (actor Warren Oates). Perfect cast.
The second episode shows the leading character killing by accident a hungry worker
and the aftermaths. It reminds me John Ford's The Grapes of Wrath.
The film-making by Kowalski is excellent featuring tilted shots inside the slum.

The first episode is entitled The Race
guest star Sam Peckinpah actors Warren Oates and L.Q. Jones
written by IMF Robert Lewin
directed by Bernard McEveety

The second one is The Enormous Fist
guest stars Lee Van Cleef, IMF Barry Atwater, IMF Douglas Anderson and Brenda Scott
written by Sam Ross
directed by IMF Bernard Kowalski
music composed by Mannix Fred Steiner

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 30, 2014 - 12:37 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

I just watched the third episode and good news, it was proto-Mission: Impossible all the way
and it was clear that Geller imposed his stamp in all departments. Let me explain the facts.
The plot starts like this:
An old man and his best friend hire three cheap hoods to rob a bank in a small town.
They rent a room and pretends to play a game of poker while digging a tunnel
to reach the bank. They do the digging each night at a precise time while double-checking
the surroundings. One (actor Lee Van Cleef) of the three hoods is a safecracker.
They hide the loot in the matress of the hotel room.
The detail of the tunnel is almost like Snowball in Hell.
This kind of plot fits the following categories: loot, vault break-in, fixed game.
It reminds previous films like Jacques Becker’s The Hole and Jules Dassin’s Rififi.
Highly recommended.

Piney
written by Clyde Ware
directed by Philip Peacock
music by Fred Steiner
guest actors: Ed Begley, Elisha Cook Jr, IMF J.D. Cannon (Cf. Action!), Tom Reese and Lee Van Cleef (again)


"Head them up! Move them Out!"

 
 Posted:   Mar 30, 2014 - 3:29 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

I'm not well versed at all with Rawhide--I've only seen a few episodes over the years--but I nevertheless read this thread with interest, just as I always read Neotrinity's Equalizer labor of love.

Keep up the excellent work and don't let the blaggards here get you down.

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 30, 2014 - 4:01 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

I'm carrying on my exploration of the series. It's fascinating how well-produced the series is
despite some conceptual limitations.

I finished disc #1

The Lost Herd
written by Archie Tegland
directed by Vincent McEveety
assistant director IMF Lee H. Katzin
guest: Harry Townes, Royal Dano, Paul Comi, IMF William O’Connell, IMF Allen Jaffe

Trail boss Gil Favor fails to deliver a whole herd and loose too many and must face his responsibility in front of his client, the boss of an association supported by a ruthless gunman, ready to annihilate any errors. The story is written like a Mission’s season 5 in which Bruce Geller plays with the weakness of the flawless leading man. It features two optical zoom shots that Geller will apply on Mission: Impossible. This is the first credit for 1st AD Lee H. Katzin. A new semi-regular pops up: cattle man Yo Yo (actor Paul Comi). Actor William O'Connell will play in many Seventies films with Clint Eastwood, including High Plains Drifter.


"Head them up! Move them Out!"

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 30, 2014 - 7:08 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Here comes the season 7 logo under Geller and Kowalski. Enjoy, boy!

 
 
 Posted:   Mar 31, 2014 - 11:56 PM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Here’s the first episode from disc #2.
It’s a weird tale that borrows from the sensitivity of writer Dostoyevsky.
Mushy, the wagon man of trail boss Gil Favor, has been conned and robbed of the valuable equipment and therefore he is fired and wanders in the hot wilderness when a traveling company of gypsy entertainers picks him up. He is sold and enslaved by a saloon bartender but a young woman gypsy is in love with him. Director Michael O’Herlihy did a fine job in the outdoor scenes.

A Man Called Mushy
written by John Mantley
directed by IMF Michael O’Herlihy
assistant director IMF Lee H. Katzin
music by IMF Rudy Schrager
guest: Mike Kellin, IMF Sandra Kerr, IMF John McLiam


"Head them up! Move them Out!"

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 1, 2014 - 10:06 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Here comes the official credits for the season 7 daring production team.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 2, 2014 - 12:14 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)



Rollin', rollin' rollin',
Rollin', rollin' rollin',
Keep movin', movin', movin',
Though they're disapprovin',
Keep them dogies movin',
Rawhide!
Don't try to understand 'em,
Just rope, throw and brand 'em,
Soon we'll be livin' high and wide!
My heart's calculatin',
My true love will be waitin',
Be waiting at the end of my ride!
Move 'em on, head 'em up, head 'em up, move 'em on,
Move 'em on, head 'em up, Rawhide!
Let 'em out, ride 'em in, ride 'em in, let' em out, cut 'em out,
Ride 'em in, Rawhide!


 
 
 Posted:   Apr 2, 2014 - 12:16 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

The Enormous Fist
music composed by Fred Steiner


 
 
 Posted:   Apr 2, 2014 - 1:19 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

A Man Called Mushy
music by IMF Rudy Schrager


 
 
 Posted:   Apr 3, 2014 - 2:32 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

That double CBS end credits is dedicated for Jimbo, my boy!

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 3, 2014 - 2:47 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Episode #6: Canliss.

It's a character study about a retiring hired killer on his last contract.
It's very intense and moving because it's also a matrimonial drama.
It has a proto-Sergio Leone flavor and takes place in Mexico.
As a reminder, the first two Stranger films were:
A Fistful of Dollars (1964) and For a Few Dollars More (1965).
Film editor Paul Krasny receives his first credit.
And film star Dean Martin is the center of this tragedy.


written by Stirling Silliphant
directed by Jack Arnold
music by IMF Rudy Schrager
film editor IMF Paul Krasny
guest: Dean Martin, Laura Devon, IMF Michael Ansara, IMF Scott Marlowe, IMF Theordore Bikel



"Head them up! Move them Out!"

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2014 - 1:26 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

The cast of characters feature the three players for the last time.
Eric Fleming will pass away the next season.


 
 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2014 - 1:32 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Here comes the opening credits for the late Eric Fleming.


 
 
 Posted:   Apr 5, 2014 - 10:54 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Episode #7: Damon’s Road, Part I
written by Richard Carr and IMF Robert Lewin
directed by IMF Michael O’Herlihy
AD Lee H. Katzin
music by IMF Rudy Schrager
"Bet It Up Boys" song by Bruce Geller (lyric) and Rudy Schrager and Herschel Burke Gilbert (music)
guest: IMF Fritz Weaver, Barbara Eden, Sean McClory, Robert Sorrells, Curt Conway, IMF Walter Mathews


It’s another proto-Mission: Impossible entry but it’s wild and picturesque.
Gil Favor and his men are conned and forced to work for a crook couple, railroad man Jonathan Damon and saloon dancer Goldie Rogers. Here’s the con: Jonathan Damon invites Gil Favor and his men to lure them into a trap: free drinks, lossless casino gamings while watching four lady entertainers called Goldie and the Kumquats doing a musical number. A fight is triggered by Damon, Goldie hits Favor from behind to abduct him and lock him in her room. The morning after, Favor realizes the manipulation of Goldie—who removed his boots—and escapes from the bedroom. Favor ends up in a cell because Goldie stages a phony felony. The cowboys of Favor are forced to sign a three months contract to avoid a jail sentence.

Wonderful all the way!


 
 
 Posted:   Apr 5, 2014 - 2:02 PM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Episode #7: Damon’s Road, Part I
"Bet It Up Boys" song by Bruce Geller (lyric) and Rudy Schrager and Herschel Burke Gilbert (music)


 
 
 Posted:   Apr 5, 2014 - 11:25 PM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Episode #8: Damon's Road, Part II
written by Richard Carr and IMF Robert Lewin
directed by IMF Michael O'Herlihy
AD Lee H. Katzin
music by Rudy Schrager
"Ten Tiny Toes" song by Bruce Geller (lyric) and Rudy Schrager and Herschel Burke Gilbert (music)
Guest: same as part 1


The second part starts with the cell ending of the first part.
This outcome part shows the revenge of barefooted Gil Favor over crook Jonathan Damon but it's done in a Machiavellian, light, comedic and surreal way. Jonathan Damon bribes the entire crew of Gil Favor, including Rowdy Yates and Wishbone, but except Jim Quince who keeps up the herd. Gil Favor uses the same devious method of Jonathan Damon to overcome: he sends a phony message concerning the payroll money of Jonathan Damon to fool a bunch of former railroad workers so that he raises an army against Damon and his men.

The plot anticipates the season 2 "Charity" (with Fritz Weaver) from Mission: Impossible that highlights a crook couple too. The new musical number in the saloon The Pink Garter features the song "Ten Tiny Toes" that will be re-used in the season 3 episodes entitled "Illusion" (with Fritz Weaver again) from Mission: Impossible.


"Head them up! Move them Out!"


 
 
 Posted:   Apr 6, 2014 - 8:01 AM   
 By:   (Member)   (Member)

Episode #8: Damon's Road, Part II
"Ten Tiny Toes" song by Bruce Geller (lyric) and Rudy Schrager and Herschel Burke Gilbert (music)


 
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