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 Posted:   Apr 14, 2014 - 10:51 AM   
 By:   Tobias   (Member)

I don't hate Hansi. What I hate is the sheer emptiness and the meaninglessness of his 'music'. There is simply not one note of Zimmer (or the employees that write for the man) that will be remembered by anyone in a few years... Although... I do remember his notes ....in my nightmares

Geert



Well, Many of those I know who are not really into film music (as much as we are) they know mostly three composers (and some of their works): John Williams, James Horner and Hans Zimmer.

 
 Posted:   Apr 14, 2014 - 11:11 AM   
 By:   MD   (Member)

Yes! Hans recently decided to quiet writing 'music' and has started to study music and history of film music.

I love when Zimmer haters speak like total idiots. They are so funny (seriously!)


It is interesting how this is in some cases also applicable for his admirers. Talk about thin line between love and hate... smile

I don't hate Hansi. What I hate is the sheer emptiness and the meaninglessness of his 'music'. There is simply not one note of Zimmer (or the employees that write for the man) that will be remembered by anyone in a few years... Although... I do remember his notes ....in my nightmares

Geert


IMHO lot of Mr. Zimmer music will be remembered for quite long time.
I still remember Rain Man main theme after first hearing 15 years ago. It is beautiful music and everything elste than "sheer emptiness and the meaninglessness"

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 14, 2014 - 11:55 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

I don't hate Hansi. What I hate is the sheer emptiness and the meaninglessness of his 'music'. There is simply not one note of Zimmer (or the employees that write for the man) that will be remembered by anyone in a few years... Although... I do remember his notes ....in my nightmares

Geert



Well, Many of those I know who are not really into film music (as much as we are) they know mostly three composers (and some of their works): John Williams, James Horner and Hans Zimmer.


I would substitute Horner with Ennio Morricone if you consider the 'general populace'.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 15, 2014 - 9:32 AM   
 By:   Alex Klein   (Member)


Well, Many of those I know who are not really into film music (as much as we are) they know mostly three composers (and some of their works): John Williams, James Horner and Hans Zimmer.


These people most probably remember the composers because they scored blockbuster hits. It's not about music, it's about the sheer popularity of the films.

Alex

 
 Posted:   Apr 15, 2014 - 9:45 AM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

Face it, Zimmer haters are a loud minority in our already small community... his music is popular not only with score fans but also with a mainstream younger audience who now associate Batman and Superman with Zimmer's music.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 15, 2014 - 11:36 AM   
 By:   Alex Klein   (Member)

Face it, Zimmer haters are a loud minority in our already small community... his music is popular not only with score fans but also with a mainstream younger audience who now associate Batman and Superman with Zimmer's music.

Perhaps, but historically speaking he will never come close to the greatness reserved for composers who were and are much better than he is. Thankfully, fans don't write the history.

Alex

 
 Posted:   Apr 15, 2014 - 11:46 AM   
 By:   mastadge   (Member)

Perhaps, but historically speaking he will never come close to the greatness reserved for composers who were and are much better than he is. Thankfully, fans don't write the history.

Who does write the history? I've seen a classical music aficionado who also keeps an ear on film music categorizing Zimmer, stylistically, with Bernstein, Goldsmith and Williams. So there's that. Or if the history is written by those tracking influence or box office, Zimmer will almost certainly get a chapter or two.

 
 Posted:   Apr 15, 2014 - 12:23 PM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)


Perhaps, but historically speaking he will never come close to the greatness reserved for composers who were and are much better than he is. Thankfully, fans don't write the history.

Alex


What greatness? What history? Are you for real?

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 16, 2014 - 7:28 AM   
 By:   paulhickling   (Member)

I've been on a Big Gundown kick lately too. It's a great companion score to Lone Ranger, which I played a ton last summer while on a 3 month long driving gig. It rarely left the truck stereo. Great driving tunes. The William Tell Overture is just unstoppable.

What's nice is that after a bit of discussion on here it's easy to suddenly get the urge to listen to some of the subjects. That's how The Big Gundown is slowly weaning me off The Lone Ranger, though at the moment they are indeed companions. It's like alternate listening choices! And you're so right about TLR being great to drive to, possibly because much of the music has a largely driving sound since a lot of it accompanies speeding scenes, be it on horseback or a speeding train.

For myself I got really addicted to the Zimmer cd whilst wallpapering the bedroom! The rolls just flew up, and it was on an endless loop setting, and I never once got bored. Infact I was sorry to finish the job! My wife doesn't realise how much gratitude she owes the composer. And I won't be telling her any time soon as she'll figure out what a great way it might be to get to do more rooms.

Cue comments about Zimmer's music being mere wallpaper.....

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 16, 2014 - 7:31 AM   
 By:   paulhickling   (Member)

Tell that to my cd player. It simply refuses to let the disc out. Nor will my mind allow me to forget any of the tracks, try as I might. I love plenty of other stuff. Just got the second Hobbit soundtrack, and just as I was about to swap the discs.... no, the Zimmer one demanded to be played yet again.

OMG. Sue the company where you bought the thing! Send the Taliban. Ask Fox Mulder to investigate this very strange case!!!! Or the NSA.......


If I needed help I'd prefer to send for International Rescue thanks. But why would I want rescuing from so much pleasure?

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 16, 2014 - 7:37 AM   
 By:   paulhickling   (Member)

Speak for yourself, nutjob.

Great! how people defend the indefensible! HANSI HANSI HANSI HANSI!


No need for defence. Zimmer's track record speaks for itself, hence the sheer amount of work he gets.

But your last remark reminds me of a great moment of black comedy from that classic movie (with an equally classic Waxman score of course), The Bride of Frankenstein.

The old couple who lost their little girl to the Monster in the previous film are on the hill watching the windmill burn down, and the wife is shouting Hans! Hans! And up pops the Monster's HAND and pulls her down to her death.

 
 Posted:   Apr 16, 2014 - 8:32 AM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

Zimmer composed a hymn for the dancefestival Tomorrowland (celebrating 10th anniversary)

and he will be present there to party! big grin

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 16, 2014 - 8:44 AM   
 By:   MikeP   (Member)

Speak for yourself, nutjob.

Great! how people defend the indefensible! HANSI HANSI HANSI HANSI!




I might listen to Ben Hur or Peyton Place in the afternoon, and then Angels & Demons in the evening. Or Goldsmith, Williams, Waxman. I'm as apt to put Zimmer's Broken Arrow in the stereo as much as To Kill A Mockingbird.


You are really just embarrassing yourself. It is kinda painful to watch.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 16, 2014 - 11:19 AM   
 By:   bagby   (Member)

Behind the scenes video of recording the score for ASM2.

The orchestral stuff, though clearly rather Coplandish "Fanfare for the Common Man," sounds great in the strings.

http://collider.com/the-amazing-spider-man-movie-clips/#more-326728

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 16, 2014 - 5:22 PM   
 By:   Alex Klein   (Member)


Who does write the history? I've seen a classical music aficionado who also keeps an ear on film music categorizing Zimmer, stylistically, with Bernstein, Goldsmith and Williams. So there's that. Or if the history is written by those tracking influence or box office, Zimmer will almost certainly get a chapter or two.


We can agree on something: Zimmer will most definitely get a chapter or two, but they will belong to sections pertaining to the decline of film music and the now common use of ghost composers and orchestrators who help Zimmer and some of his unfortunate "disciples" to finish their scores on time.

Alex

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 16, 2014 - 5:27 PM   
 By:   Alex Klein   (Member)


What greatness? What history? Are you for real?


Yep. The greatness that surrounds the music of Herrmann, Goldsmith, Williams, Barry and the like is absent in Zimmer. He may be popular nowadays because his name is attached to virtually every loud box office hit, but in the grand scheme of film music he is nobody. He will never come close to the above mentioned musicians. Not by a mile. In fact, I know many completely unknown composers here in Colombia who are way better than he is. I can't imagine how many are out there in the world who are also way better.

Alex

 
 Posted:   Apr 27, 2014 - 8:14 AM   
 By:   First Breath   (Member)


What greatness? What history? Are you for real?


Yep. The greatness that surrounds the music of Herrmann, Goldsmith, Williams, Barry and the like is absent in Zimmer. He may be popular nowadays because his name is attached to virtually every loud box office hit, but in the grand scheme of film music he is nobody. He will never come close to the above mentioned musicians. Not by a mile. In fact, I know many completely unknown composers here in Colombia who are way better than he is. I can't imagine how many are out there in the world who are also way better.

Alex


LOL. At least he's better than you.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 27, 2014 - 9:16 PM   
 By:   SJB   (Member)

You guys are crazy, I'll always remember the Rain Man and Days of Thunder scores.

 
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