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 Posted:   Apr 4, 2014 - 7:31 AM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

I am not sure if I did something like this a long time ago. but if I did it must have been a while back and there are new members here all the time.Do you have any memorable moments when you heard that one of your favorite composers passed on. If you like add on other people in other occupations as well.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2014 - 7:36 AM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

For starters as I mentioned on my birthday thread, I was listening to news radio WINS in New York at about 9 pm on that summer's night in 04 when I heard THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN theme came on, my thoughts immediately was ELMER has died before the newsman spoke. I was correct. I was floating on one of those air balloons out at sea in 1980 when on a radio I had with me said PETER SELLERS had died today of a fatal heart attack. more to come.

 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2014 - 7:37 AM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

I was calling Gabriel Yared for my first major interview. It was early morning here and I had not been online. He broke the news to me Goldsmith had passed.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2014 - 7:47 AM   
 By:   Dan Hobgood   (Member)

I imagine I'll never forget the morning I found out Jerry Goldsmith had died.

At the time, I had been binging on the John Barry music from my collection; as fate would have it, though, I'd decided I was in the mood for Jerry that day, and in particular, The River Wild. Perfect music for sunny, summer weather. Also as fate would have it, I did something I almost never do when on a schedule: after I pulled into my parking space, I decided to sit in the car to listen to all of the end credits music--even though only one minute or so had elapsed at that point. I just sat there, with a smile on my face, savoring Jerry's genius, as if he were sitting right next to me. Mere moments later, I'd discover that listening to Jerry Goldsmith music would never quite be the same. If only I'd known.

I got to my desk and situated myself, ready to be productive. As usual, I went to check the news online and look at the FSM board, to see the topics of the day. There was only one: "Jerry Goldsmith R.I.P."

My day was over at that point.

Has it really been ten years since life as we film score fans knew it changed forever?

Gosh . . . .

Dan

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2014 - 8:47 AM   
 By:   Kev McGann   (Member)

I remember arriving at our hotel in Boston USA while on holiday and logging onto the hotel reception internet to catch up with stuff and reading that Basil Poledouris had died.
I'd seen and met him at Ubeda Spain only months before and had thought he was on his way to a full recovery! He had seemed so energised and I was expecting new scoring announcements...NOT THIS! frown
I'm pretty sure I would have spent some of that day listening to his scores on my mp3 player during any spare time. Sad day.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2014 - 8:56 AM   
 By:   dashrr   (Member)

I was 15 years old when I picked up the latest issue of Films in Review Jan 1976 edition when I turned to a 'quickly added' leaflet page that stated..."it is with great sadness that we announce the untimely passing of Bernard Herrmann this Christmas past...there will be a memorial tribute in next months issue of Films in Review." I was blown away.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2014 - 8:59 AM   
 By:   captain_avis   (Member)

I wasn't doing anything particularly noteworthy that day, but I remember vividly exactly where I was when I heard that Goldsmith died. It was the first time that I was profoundly affected by the passing of someone that I didn't personally know and I was in a funk for the next couple of days. The only time something comparable has happened to me was when Roger Ebert, whose writing really connected to me, passed on.

Chris

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2014 - 9:07 AM   
 By:   jkannry   (Member)

I remember when Russell Garcia died and had great yearning to play the time machine. Bought another copy.Remember when Joel goldsmith died and how sad that was. Bought another copy which was digital.

John Barry. Was touched by how well celebrated in mass media he was. Toyed with London concert. Played a lot of the Barry I already had as it was digitized and easily accessed.

I'm always puzzled how Jerry's death didn't register on me. Don't remember on news. I was also between rec.music.movies and my new home in fsm. My "i-life" made it so easy to be on FSM. So if missed news missed news. Ironic given how he's taken over my collection.

 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2014 - 9:57 AM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

I wasn't doing anything particularly noteworthy that day, but I remember vividly exactly where I was when I heard that Goldsmith died. It was the first time that I was profoundly affected by the passing of someone that I didn't personally know and I was in a funk for the next couple of days. The only time something comparable has happened to me was when Roger Ebert, whose writing really connected to me, passed on.

Chris


What Chris said, and I was also taken aback by Ebert's passing.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2014 - 5:58 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

I was coming home from work in MARCH of 1992,it was around 6.pm. As always back then it was my routine to pick up a newspaper before I head home on the subway in New York.It was a pleasant warm day and not being in a rush I decide to sit down and read the paper on a park bench. Reading the obits I read GEORGES DELERUE, French film composer had died. My initial reaction was WOW, OH MY. I decided to sit on that park bench for a while taking on a sought of surprised meditated state of mind. Didn't expect that to happen at 67 and still so active. Sadly I guess a little too active.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2014 - 11:29 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Nothing in particular has happened on any of these deaths for me. I went online in the morning and discovered the news -- either here, on facebook or some other forum.

Maybe the lack of an 'exciting context' is because none of my TOP favourite composers have passed away yet. I'm still dreading the day I read the sad news about John Williams, for example. I think I will remember everything about that day.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2014 - 11:29 PM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Nothing in particular has happened on any of these deaths for me. I went online in the morning and discovered the news -- either here, on facebook or some other forum.

Maybe the lack of an 'exciting context' is because none of my TOP favourite composers have passed away yet. I'm still dreading the day I read the sad news about John Williams, for example. I think I will remember everything about that day. If I live that long myself.

 
 Posted:   Apr 4, 2014 - 11:57 PM   
 By:   SchiffyM   (Member)

Interesting how many of these I remember. (I do wonder why I can remember these events and not the names of people I see three times a week!)

I remember seeing Alex North's obit in the LA Times. Georges Delerue's, too. In both cases, my reaction was disappointment that they were gone forever without me really appreciating that they were alive the day before.

I was on CNN.com first thing one morning and saw a headline that said something like "Star Trek composer dies," and I was very groggy but thought "Damn, there it is." I knew there'd been a collective denial on this board that Goldsmith was nearing the end -- it was obvious he was dying, but nobody wanted to face it. I didn't even click on the link for about a half-hour after that.

I was on my way to a concert my cousin was performing when I heard that Elmer Bernstein had died. I was stuck in LA traffic, so I put the "Elmer Bernstein by Elmer Bernstein" on -- by coincidence, I had the CD in my car!

The shocker to me was Basil Poledouris. I had no expectation of his death, and I was at work and noticed the news on my computer between meetings. It was right here on the FSM board, and the subject was something like "RIP Basil Poledouris," and I didn't really process it. I thought maybe it was a scoring assignment or something -- a movie called "RIP." Maybe I was just hoping. That one really threw me.

Same for Shirley Walker, just a few weeks later. Same job, same stunned reaction. A few years earlier, I'd had a couple of email correspondences with her (she told me how to sneak into the old Todd-AO scoring stage which was right outside my office at the time, though I was too chicken to ever try it). So soon after we lost Poledouris, and the same way-too-young age, I remember thinking "What is going on?"

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 5, 2014 - 6:33 AM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

I was a little kid but I knew already about movies and the enjoyment of them. It was a very cold morning in FEBRUARY 1969 and as usual around 7 am in the morning, me and my dad were eating breakfast. I, getting ready to go to school, my dad to work. I with my TRIX, dad with his CORN FLAKES. His transistor radio was on the kitchen table as usual, he also as usual had New York's news station on WINS, On came the announcement BORIS KARLOFF well known British actor of films and stage passed away at the age of 81[pretty good life for those days, over 40 years ago]however I dropped my spoon and was stunned. My father was surprised and said 'What do you know 'He loved movies as well. Never forgot that moment 45 years ago.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 5, 2014 - 7:43 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

I was in a STAPLES store on WEST 40 STREET AND SIXTH AVENUE IN NEW YORK CITY IN JUNE 1994 when I heard on somebody's radio that HENRY MANCINI has died. I knew he had cancer but I was surprised to hear it.As I left the store I started to think all the nice music he composed and how it effected my love life through the years.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 5, 2014 - 8:12 PM   
 By:   ANHaupt1337   (Member)

After a long Christmas trip in 1975, I finally made it home to my efficiency apt., shut the door, pulled myself together enough to peruse a new Time magazine and eat something. And all of a sudden, I realized I was looking at an obituary for Bernard Herrmann. And I could not believe it. His star was rising then, he was being appreciated.

 
 Posted:   Apr 5, 2014 - 8:17 PM   
 By:   johnjohnson   (Member)

18th August 2004, I was in the Crown Bar in Boness, Scotland, when the news about Elmer Bernstein was announced on the BBC news.

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 6, 2014 - 2:25 AM   
 By:   Bob DiMucci   (Member)

I was getting ready to leave for work in the morning, when the CBS Radio Network news announced the death of Jerry Goldsmith. The report was accompanied by only two music cues: the opening credits themes from the television shows "The Twilight Zone" and "Perry Mason." I couldn't believe that they had played two pieces of music that Goldsmith hadn't composed. When I got to work, I tried to find an e-mail address for CBS Radio News, but I could not, so I sent the following e-mail to my local affiliate:

-----------------------------------------------
From: Robert DiMucci,
Alexandria, VA
8:31 AM

Sorry: I couldn't find an e-mail address for CBS radio anywhere so I'm
sending this to you. The 8:00 AM CBS network news broadcast reported the
death of film composer Jerry Goldsmith. The only music they played in the
piece was the themes from the Twilight Zone and Perry Mason TV shows.
GOLDSMITH DID NOT COMPOSE EITHER THEME. The confusion is that Goldsmith
composed some of the episode scores for Twilight Zone, and the score for
Twilight Zone: The Movie. Marius Constant composed the famous Twilight Zone
TV theme. Goldsmith also did not compose the theme to Perry Mason; Fred
Steiner did. Please have CBS play the theme from Star Trek: The Motion
Picture or Star Trek: The Next Generation (not the original Star Trek
series) or the theme from Patton, both of which are recognizable and which
Goldsmith DID compose.

----------------------------------------
At 8:36 AM, I received the following reply from the affiliate:
-----------------------------------------

We forwarded that to CBS News in NY for you. Thanks for writing and
thanks for listening to WTOP Radio.

From: Jim Farley [mailto:jfarley@wtopnews.com]
Sent: Thursday, July 22, 2004 8:36 AM
To: Burke, Charlotte; Kaye, Charlie; Lloyd, Constance
Subject: From a CBS Radio News/WTOP listener

---------------------------------------------
At 9:37 AM, I received the the following e-mail from CBS News New York:
-----------------------------------------------

Mr. DiMucci, our apologies. You are correct. We have killed all cuts not composed by Goldsmith. Our sources were not explicit and did not distinguish between an episode and the theme.

We always strive to credit people accurately, and we did not go beyond the initial notice of his death.
Thank you for pointing this out.

-------------------------------------------------

A month later, when Elmer Bernstein died, I heard of his death on the same 8 AM news broadcast. This time CBS played accurate music.

 
 Posted:   Apr 6, 2014 - 3:13 AM   
 By:   pzfan   (Member)


The shocker to me was Basil Poledouris. I had no expectation of his death, and I was at work and noticed the news on my computer between meetings. It was right here on the FSM board, and the subject was something like "RIP Basil Poledouris," and I didn't really process it. I thought maybe it was a scoring assignment or something -- a movie called "RIP." Maybe I was just hoping. That one really threw me.


I don't think, there was a thread called "RIP Basil Poledouris" on FSM board.
It was reported here by Lukas Kendall
http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?pageID=1&forumID=1&threadID=37961&archive=1

 
 
 Posted:   Apr 6, 2014 - 4:48 AM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

THANKS for digging that old thread out on the death of Basil, it was very touching seeing how many people were hurt and sadden by his passing back then. He was a fine composer and from what I heard a very nice man.

 
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