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 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 10:27 AM   
 By:   jfallon   (Member)

...if they decided to go the download route? It would mean slightly more profits for them as well as allowing more funds to devote towards researching, mastering and purchasing rights towards future releases. Frankly I think they deserve more profit. They work hard feeding our eclectic tastes and obsessions. For me it wouldn't deter me one bit. What do I do when I buy a cd? Immediately rip it, put it on a shelf and never look at it again. Could this be a real possibility for the labels? Just a curious random thought.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 10:32 AM   
 By:   captain_avis   (Member)

...if they decided to go the download route? It would mean slightly more profits for them as well as allowing more funds to devote towards researching, mastering and purchasing rights towards future releases. Frankly I think they deserve more profit. They work hard feeding our eclectic tastes and obsessions. For me it wouldn't deter me one bit. What do I do when I buy a cd? Immediately rip it, put it on a shelf and never look at it again. Could this be a real possibility for the labels? Just a curious random thought.

I prefer CD releases... there's something about the tactile quality of holding a collectable that I really appreciate. That said, I live outside of the States and shipping costs are getting high enough these days that I'm increasingly open to digital purchases. I'd absolutely buy digital downloads from the specialty labels. The issue, it would seem, is that many of the film studios seem to prefer to keep the digital rights for themselves, particularly on bigger films. Which, I guess, is why you typically only see labels like MovieScore Media and the odd digital release from LLL when it's a smaller property.

Chris.

 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 10:39 AM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

No. Just like I don't own a single speciality, or regular commercial score release, of a score. And I don't miss any of it!

 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 10:46 AM   
 By:   mstrox   (Member)

Yep - I'd still buy what I buy on CD (assuming CD is still an option) but if downloads were available for a price point between $10-15, I'd probably "take a chance" on a lot of releases that I pass on for $20.

 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 10:54 AM   
 By:   Adam B.   (Member)

If they offer both CD and download I will always buy the CD even if it costs three times as much. Shipping charges don't matter to me. If they offer download only then obviously I would have no choice but to purchase that.

 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 10:55 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

If the specialty labels went download only then yes I would still purchase their titles. But if it is a choice between a CD and download I will always pick the CD.



 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 11:03 AM   
 By:   Nyborg   (Member)

i'd continue to seek out the unearthed music and improved sound of the specialty labels no matter what the format but i moved away from playing music off a computer a few years ago and have no desire to go back - my cd player and amp are dependable machines, computers are a pain in the ass - plus i like physical media and i'd like to see it persist - the other genre i collect, metal music, has seen a huge increase in vinyl traffic over the last few years, instigated by the bands themselves and endorsed by the fans, the genre is well known for having a lot of imagery on its album covers and inlays, and when the extra effort is made it's really appreciated, and i like to think film scores, with all the all the support media that's already in place, not to mention all the details about the how the projects developed under the star/studio system, also have plenty to offer in that regard.

in twenty years time am i still going to have the computer drives i'm using now? is my whole identity going to be contained in the cloud? or am i more likely to have a decent den to sit in with all this cool stuff around me?

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 11:04 AM   
 By:   Tango Urilla   (Member)

I would likely buy less if it was download only. The only times I ever go the download route now are when I absolutely must have the music in question and can't find it anywhere else or when I just want to cherry-pick a couple great tracks off an otherwise lackluster album.

Part of the appeal for me with specialty label releases are the gorgeous art designs, the extensive and informative liner notes, and the anticipation of waiting for your music to arrive in the mail and ripping it open to finally have it there in your hands. Not to mention the signatures. Downloading a digital signature just wouldn't carry the same appeal. Also, those e-pens can be awfully difficult to write with. wink

 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 11:20 AM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

If they offered BOTH, some titles that I wont buy on CD I might give a try on download.

 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 11:23 AM   
 By:   chriss   (Member)

No.

 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 11:35 AM   
 By:   Trent B.   (Member)

If offered in lossless format, then possibly. However, I would still get the physical CDs.

 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 11:41 AM   
 By:   jedizim   (Member)

Probably not if they were still 20 dollars...

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 11:41 AM   
 By:   Niall from Ireland   (Member)

No, but if they brought out something I really wanted on Download only and somebody offered me a CDR I'd accept it!

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 11:45 AM   
 By:   Traveling Matt   (Member)

No for me as well. CDs only.

Also, it's not accurate to assume money would be saved with downloads. Bandwidth costs are tremendous and can easily outpace storage costs for discs.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 11:47 AM   
 By:   Traveling Matt   (Member)

...

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 11:48 AM   
 By:   Traveling Matt   (Member)

...

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 12:03 PM   
 By:   Tobias   (Member)

...if they decided to go the download route? It would mean slightly more profits for them as well as allowing more funds to devote towards researching, mastering and purchasing rights towards future releases. Frankly I think they deserve more profit. They work hard feeding our eclectic tastes and obsessions. For me it wouldn't deter me one bit. What do I do when I buy a cd? Immediately rip it, put it on a shelf and never look at it again. Could this be a real possibility for the labels? Just a curious random thought.

Then I will say that I am finished collecting soundtracks. You say you rip it and put it on a shelf and never look at it again, that is something I`ve never done. I have never downloaded and will never do.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 12:06 PM   
 By:   Les Jepson   (Member)

CD, every time.

 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 12:11 PM   
 By:   Sirusjr   (Member)

Assuming that it is lossless quality and contains a PDF of the liner notes then absolutely I would jump on it. Not only would I save on shipping but I would save on having to scan everything myself. I would go this way even if there was a CD option. In a perfect world I could buy everything in digital lossless and never have to buy a CD again. The last digital download film score I bought was Rise of the Guardians. I would buy a lot more if they were all available for good quality downloads.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 13, 2014 - 12:17 PM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)

Maybe, though only if lossless and I'd prefer the pricing model of eClassical.com, where you pay for how much you buy rather than be tied to full albums and if you don't want everything you have to pay through the nose for what you DO want (it's ridiculous for a disc to be priced at $10 but have seven tracks of 10 minutes each be priced at $3 per track. or something similar)

 
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