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 Posted:   Jun 14, 2014 - 7:13 AM   
 By:   solium   (Member)



If anything specialty labels may cut back on the amount of releases at some point, but for those who watch their bottom line, they can survive even if the CD becomes a niche collector format much like vinyl.


What good is a CD if you can't use it? Car manufactures don't put CD players in cars anymore. Apple took the optical drive out of their computers. How long will manufactures continue to make CD players? I suppose one will be able to special order a CD player or external optical drive like we can a turntable. I don't know, does anyone sell cassette or 8 track players anymore?

 
 Posted:   Jun 14, 2014 - 2:16 PM   
 By:   Sirusjr   (Member)



If anything specialty labels may cut back on the amount of releases at some point, but for those who watch their bottom line, they can survive even if the CD becomes a niche collector format much like vinyl.


What good is a CD if you can't use it? Car manufactures don't put CD players in cars anymore. Apple took the optical drive out of their computers. How long will manufactures continue to make CD players? I suppose one will be able to special order a CD player or external optical drive like we can a turntable. I don't know, does anyone sell cassette or 8 track players anymore?


Very true. If someone happened to move 99% of their computer usage to tablet and smartphone then there would be no way to even rip the music that someone lawfully purchased. Thus why Amazon created the auto-rip service for major releases so that you can have a way to download a digital copy. Also perfectly explains why nobody has started offering lossless downloads, they are focused on the consumers who are listening to music primarily on devices that have very small internal memories or otherwise expecting stuff to be streamed and lossless is not easily streamed on the cloud.

 
 Posted:   Jun 14, 2014 - 2:30 PM   
 By:   LeHah   (Member)

I am not into digital downloads. Hard drive crashes, external backup failures, water damage... Admittedly, nothing is truly secure and perfectly infallible but for me, owning a thing physically has a greater sense of "safety".

On the other hand, I will freely admit that occasionally the digital format has saved my ass. I bought the three discs of music from the game Skyrim this weekend for $15 on ITunes instead of shelling out $80 - $200 for a physical copy.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 14, 2014 - 2:43 PM   
 By:   jkannry   (Member)

Yes. Especially if booklets were part of download.

Plus there are the space issues especially in city apartments and marital in suburbs with houses overflowing with CDs.

Lukas switching sold me. If they have PDF booklet but digital.

I'm sure there were people who said they'd never buy a cd and if no on vinyl wouldn't buy. Look how that turned out

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 14, 2014 - 3:29 PM   
 By:   Mr. Popular   (Member)



If anything specialty labels may cut back on the amount of releases at some point, but for those who watch their bottom line, they can survive even if the CD becomes a niche collector format much like vinyl.


What good is a CD if you can't use it? Car manufactures don't put CD players in cars anymore. Apple took the optical drive out of their computers. How long will manufactures continue to make CD players? I suppose one will be able to special order a CD player or external optical drive like we can a turntable. I don't know, does anyone sell cassette or 8 track players anymore?


People still buy blu ray players and PCs with burners. Portable burners still sell for those Apple users who want one. PLUS most people who listen to soundtracks will have their players. What people seem to be forgetting is that there are still more than enough players in homes and elsewhere to keep the format alive for the time being, hence why I use the word "niche".

I see the sales numbers regularly. The decline is happening YET all the doomsdayers who said the CD was done years ago have stopped predicting the end. The end will come but vinyl has proven a good niche business can be had if managed properly.

Somehow people found ways to play vinyl when turntables all but stopped being sold in regular stores. Same thing is happening with the cassette.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 14, 2014 - 3:36 PM   
 By:   Mr. Popular   (Member)



If anything specialty labels may cut back on the amount of releases at some point, but for those who watch their bottom line, they can survive even if the CD becomes a niche collector format much like vinyl.


What good is a CD if you can't use it? Car manufactures don't put CD players in cars anymore. Apple took the optical drive out of their computers. How long will manufactures continue to make CD players? I suppose one will be able to special order a CD player or external optical drive like we can a turntable. I don't know, does anyone sell cassette or 8 track players anymore?


People still buy blu ray players and PCs with burners. Portable burners still sell for those Apple users who want one. PLUS most people who listen to soundtracks will have their players. What people seem to be forgetting is that there are still more than enough players in homes and elsewhere to keep the format alive for the time being, hence why I use the word "niche".

I see the sales numbers regularly. The decline is happening YET all the doomsdayers who said the CD was done years ago have stopped predicting the end. The end will come but vinyl has proven a good niche business can be had if managed properly.

Somehow people found ways to play vinyl when turntables all but stopped being sold in regular stores. Same thing is happening with the cassette.


BTW (nobody is saying this will ever come close to vinyl but it is amusing to see the hub-bub):

Cassette Store Day is back. Following an inaugural run last year, the unrelated
companion to Record Store Day returns to the U.K., Europe, and the U.S. on Sept.
27.

As announced on its Tumblr on Monday, the event will again feature London cassette
labels Kissability and Suplex running things in the U.K. and E.U.; this time, however,
Fullerton, Calif.'s Burger Records will be helping out stateside.
Bringing Record Stores Back to Black: Record Store Day's Carrie Colliton on U2,
Retail Celebration and... Cassettes?

When the World First Met the LP, Cassettes, CD and other Physical Formats (From
the Billboard Archive)

Chart Moves: Dixie Chicks' Natalie Maines Makes Solo Debut, She & Him Bows
on Cassette“Burger Records loves tapes!," said the punk and garage stronghold in the post.
"We’ve built our foundation on the forgotten format and have been preaching the
merits of warm analog cassette culture for years. We’re honored to be ambassadors
of Cassette Store Day 2014 in the good ol' USA! We plan to bring some of our
favorite labels to the table and invite everyone to the party and partake in the fun
phenomena of releasing top shelf music on cassette tapes in pop culture today!”
Added Kissability's Jen Long, “When planning this year we really tried to keep
cassette labels and fans at the heart of the event. Last year grew far bigger than we
had expected so we are thrilled to have Burger involved to help us cover the US
side.”

While CSD 2013 (which took place on Sept. 7) warmed the hearts and ears of
listeners both nostalgic for music journalist Rob Sheffield's "Love Is A Mixtape" era
and hopeful for analog's growing sweet spot in the music industry, it did not inspire
strong sales: in the week ending Sept. 8, 2013, cassette albums sold just 1,000 -- up
1% compared to the previous week, according to Nielsen SoundScan. To boot, those
numbers represent a miniscule 0.02% of the total 289 million music units moved sold
in 2013.

But CSD co-founder Steve Rose is undaunted. When asked if cassettes will make as
big a comeback as vinyl has -- which last year's RSD drove to the highest sales since
Nielsen Soundscan started tracking in 1991 -- he told Billboard, "The reception to
CSD has also been overwhelming which seems to go hand-in-hand with the rising
popularity of this accessible, affordable audio medium...The cassette is still a very
current format in DIY and underground scenes due to its affordability and ease. I also
think physical formats will stick around in music as when you are a fan you want
more than a digital file. You want something you can interact with that holds a greater
worth and reward."

This year's CSD participants have yet to be announced, but last year saw releases
from the likes of the Flaming Lips, At The Drive-In, and Deerhunter.

http://www.billboard.com/biz/articles/news/retail/6114189/cassette-store-day-2014-announced

 
 Posted:   Jun 14, 2014 - 5:17 PM   
 By:   solium   (Member)

Cassette's were a great medium!

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 14, 2014 - 5:24 PM   
 By:   djintrepid   (Member)

As long as the release is 16/44 or higher and cheaper by at least $5 than a CD release, I would definitely purchase digital downloads.

 
 Posted:   Jun 14, 2014 - 6:04 PM   
 By:   robertmro   (Member)

I would welcome it.
My CDs take up too much space and they're a pain in the ass when I move.
And I only listen to them with iTunes off a hard drive anyway.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 14, 2014 - 7:18 PM   
 By:   MikeP   (Member)

If the specialty labels went download only then yes I would still purchase their titles. But if it is a choice between a CD and download I will always pick the CD.



What he said. Given a choice, CD always. But if nothing but a download is available, I'd buy it a title I really wanted.

A few years ago, responding to a question in another thread ( have no earthly idea which one ) MV of LaLa said if "The Long Kiss Goodnight" or "Seven" ever had complete score albums, they'd be downloads. If that ever came to pass, sure I'd wish we had them on CD. But the downloads would be bought right away.

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2014 - 4:12 PM   
 By:   johnbijl   (Member)

Just the other day I saw an announcement via Billboard that Cassette Store Day is coming!


It's like somebody is saying: 'hey, that boiling of water before we drink it is not how it used to be. Let's all drink straight from the sewer. It's hip to get diphtheria!'

 
 Posted:   Jun 16, 2014 - 2:19 AM   
 By:   Drawgoon   (Member)

If they start offering higher resolution audios, surround presentations, digital booklets and maybe even printable artworks for those who want to burn their own physical copies... well, how can I say no that?

 
 Posted:   Jun 16, 2014 - 5:53 AM   
 By:   Ron Hardcastle   (Member)

I too prefer CDs (and SACDs when they're available -- and they're still making them with better dynamics and sometimes multi-channels). But I find that many newly composed soundtracks from the past year or so require, for me at least, only a handful of cues to satisfy me, and I'm buying less and less on disc. Of course I continue to buy the elaborate expansions put out by La-La-Land and Kritzerland and Intrada and SAE and Tadlow and others, but they are usually from periods when film composers provided a wealth of musical ideas for their soundtracks.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 16, 2014 - 9:55 PM   
 By:   propinquity   (Member)

I only purchase CDs. It's not just about the music; it's about the booklet and the way the material is presented. There's still magic to it, at least for me. Purchasing a download holds no excitement, other than the music itself.

So if and when Williams' Dracula gets the restoration it deserves, I'll buy the CD, eagerly await its arrival in the mail, and when I finally put my hands on it, I'll lie on the couch and listen to the music while reading the accompanying booklet.

It's just the way things should be.

 
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