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 Posted:   Jun 14, 2014 - 7:17 PM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

El bruco dissing Goodfellas??

Go on. Go to the back.
theres always one, isnt there!


He's a funny guy, you know. big grin

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 14, 2014 - 7:27 PM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

Funny how? Hes a clown? Hes here to amuse you?


Ok ok stop that.


 
 Posted:   Jun 14, 2014 - 7:37 PM   
 By:   Grecchus   (Member)

Underrated - The Color of Money

Forest Whitaker hustling The Hustler. There might be something in that.

 
 Posted:   Jun 14, 2014 - 7:58 PM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

[OVERRATED
GOODFELLAS - a repugnant, repellent, pointless piece of pulp
TAXI DRIVER (see above)


Sheesh. Marshall gets a few drinks down his hatch and he becomes Michael Medved.

 
 Posted:   Jun 14, 2014 - 11:35 PM   
 By:   Heath   (Member)

Saw The Departed yesterday. Fantastic. A question and its answer occurred to me while watching. How the hell can Scorsese make films that look like they were directed by a 25 year old genius with everything to prove? Answer - because most of the 25 year old geniuses are still copying him.

But no one can make a Scorsese movie quite like Scorsese. Apart from anything else, so few have his pervasive sense of "strangeness". Even in a cops n robbers film like The Departed there's a unique air of the uncanny - as if the events were being hallucinated by the characters rather than lived – and it feels all the more real for that. Quite extraordinary.

A phenomenal talent.

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2014 - 12:49 PM   
 By:   nuts_score   (Member)

Well said above, Heath. Scorsese is one of the most communicative filmmakers speaking with the language of the medium itself. I can't even think of a more idiosyncratic director/editor team than Scorsese and Thelma Schoonmaker. Her work elevates the hallucinatory nature of his films, and Shutter Island is, to me, a gold standard for the well-crafted suspense thriller with its intricacies and nuance. Even the ending, debated still, churns against a typical twist by leaving the note unfinished. That's triumphant editing.

P.S. That's me also putting in Shutter Island as my pick for most underrated film by Martin Scorsese. Overrated? I have no stones to cast. His work is rated just fine in my opinion.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2014 - 1:40 PM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

I enjoy the insights posters have shared about this director.

I do think he is talented, but sometimes he makes movies about such reprehensible characters that it is
hard for me to emotionally engage in certain movies. There are times that he seems to love
sliminess and “sickoness” just too much.

Also, at times I wonder why he ignores the richness of solid dialogue in some of his movies when the words “F… and F…ing,” constitute 95% of the spoken language. (Once in a while he actually puts an article (a, an, and the) in between his F words). I’d like to see a few more nouns, pronouns and different verbs peppered in between his “F… you” dialogues. wink (No, I’m not a prude, but I like insightful dialogue.)
I’d also like to see more interesting women in his movies. He is kind of a “Man’s Man” director.

I never could get through Gangs Of New York or Bringing Up The Dead.

On the other hand, I have really admired and enjoyed The Departed, Age Of Innocence, Shutter Island and The Color of Money. I thought Cape Fear was well-done. He can also draw excellent performances from his actors.

I guess for my own personal taste, he is either a big hit or a big miss.

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2014 - 2:52 PM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

There are times that he seems to love
sliminess and “sickoness” just too much
.

Also, at times I wonder why he ignores the richness of solid dialogue in some of his movies when the words “F… and F…ing,” constitute 95% of the spoken language. (Once in a while he actually puts an article (a, an, and the) in between his F words). I’d like to see a few more nouns, pronouns and different verbs peppered in between his “F… you” dialogues. wink (No, I’m not a prude, but I like insightful dialogue.)
I’d also like to see more interesting women in his movies. He is kind of a “Man’s Man” director.


You should most definitely avoid The Wolf of Wall Street. big grin

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2014 - 4:34 PM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

You are right, Mark. Some of my friends told me about the Wall Street movie, and I doubt that I would totally embrace it.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2014 - 6:53 PM   
 By:   jenkwombat   (Member)

I agree with you about excessive cursing, Joan; I don't like it. It just sounds.... crass. And dumb. Also, it loses all meaning after a while, so that it doesn't even register as elevated anger anymore after it's been used repeatedly for no good reason...

I realize people do talk like that in real life (and they sound dumb as well), and that the screenwriters/filmmakers are probably just aiming for realism, but it really does lose its impact after the 300th "F-Bomb" has been hurled at the audience.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2014 - 8:14 PM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

I agree, Jenk. The impact of expletives diminishes when that is all an audience hears. I want the narrative to move forward via action and dialogue, and saying nothing but "F you" for 2 hours finally becomes redundant and even boring.

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2014 - 8:21 PM   
 By:   nuts_score   (Member)

I know this sounds trite, my friends, but my opinion on the scripts in many Scorsese films including expletives and foul language is that the characters speak the language of their environment. They are Americans, and most of his films are from the perspective of the street and the denizens of cultures and lives we do not lead. So being that it seems crass and un-necessary to you, it carries with it incredible verisimilitude and circumstance.

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2014 - 8:40 PM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

nut_score, I've always thought that Scorsese is aiming for a kind of cultural verisimilitude with his dialogue. I agree with you. However, I personally just get kind of bored with repetition.

 
 Posted:   Jun 15, 2014 - 10:18 PM   
 By:   Heath   (Member)

You are right, Mark. Some of my friends told me about the Wall Street movie, and I doubt that I would totally embrace it.

It is a very funny movie though. However, the sexism/macho grandstanding reaches olympian levels that actually exceed those in Scorsese's crime pictures! But I give him the benefit of the doubt and say he was using it to indict those attitudes - kind of like what Kubrick did with war mongery and crazy generals in Dr Strangelove.

 
 Posted:   Jun 16, 2014 - 8:19 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

[OVERRATED
GOODFELLAS - a repugnant, repellent, pointless piece of pulp
TAXI DRIVER (see above)


Sheesh. Marshall gets a few drinks down his hatch and he becomes Michael Medved.



More like Ron Pulliam
smile

 
 Posted:   Jun 16, 2014 - 8:21 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

El bruco dissing Goodfellas??

Go on. Go to the back.
theres always one, isnt there!


I accept the fact that the whole world thinks this a masterpiece.
But, Me and Ron Pulliam refuse to go along with the brainwashing program!

 
 Posted:   Jun 16, 2014 - 8:22 PM   
 By:   Mr. Marshall   (Member)

Funny how? Hes a clown? Hes here to amuse you?


Ok ok stop that.


Go see MEAN STREETS
100 times better than Badfellas

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 16, 2014 - 8:38 PM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

Dp

 
 
 Posted:   Jun 16, 2014 - 8:38 PM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

Go see Mean streets? Wot, like i nevr saw it at the cinema, one of the first films i had on video in the 70s, el bruco.

U aint the only old git on here you know!

 
 Posted:   Jun 16, 2014 - 8:47 PM   
 By:   Mark R. Y.   (Member)

You don't make up for your sins in the church. You do it here on the FSM message board. The rest is bullshit and you know it.

J/K. I like Mean Streets just as much as Goodfellas. smile

 
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